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Showing content with the highest reputation since 22/07/21 in all areas

  1. and @wherebee Staff are not wanting the overtime mainly for stress reasons as I understand it. Currently,we're receiving 50% more calls than the busiest New Years Eve pre covid.Normally for NYE,we'll ahve extra crews on. BackgroundWe have four categories of job,1 to 4.1 being life threatening,4 being a medical minor or hospital transfer. In normal times,I'd take a patient into Resus maybe once every two shifts,maybe less-these are patients with acute life threatening issues.Everyone else either stays home or goes to normal A&E. Currently,we're going to Resus two times a shift(3 the other night).Maybe we're unlucky but with less crews on,it stands to reason.These Cat 1 jobs can be very stressful as people can be near death or sometimes-very rarely thankfully-pass away on the vehicle during transport.Sustaining a pt who's on the edge of life itself,can be very stressful. In between these jobs we're going to patients who have sometimes been waiting fiven to ten hours or more for us, and where the patient may have been on the floor for the whole ten hours. It goes without saying really,that if people are waiting 5-10 hours for a response,by the time we get there ,their condition can often have worsened considerably.I went to a patient the other night who had three chronic issues ongoing anyone of which would have justified me ringing Resus and alerting him in-three.Not just one. One shift last week,we were outside a care home about to alert a pt to Resus and there's a tap at the door and one of the patients in the care home has collapsed.I ditch my crew mate,go in and end up calling for back up crews to get this pt on a strecther and then alerted into Resus.The Dr at the hospital at the hospital was a bit teed off about the poor quality of my hand over but I pointed out that we'd got two pts in there and I was on my own.40 minutes later said Doctor still couldn't work out what was going on with the pt. It's not jsut amublance staff getting frazzled but A&E staff are getting it even worse than us. So that's the snapshot of my worklife at the minute.Hope it explains why people choose to stay home rather than pay 40% tax on their overtime payments-again credit to the thread and @DurhamBornin particular for running this theme.It's coming true.People are genuinely chinning off the overtime to avoid the stress. Young people getting smashed and enjoying life I'm really happy to see
    36 points
  2. @sancho panza its funny you mention falls,because thats what half the calls my partner responds to are.Its when they press their button etc.Usually two respond to a fall because one really struggles to do it well,and not at all for obese people.They are so short staffed they have been sending them on their own for falls.One woman,very very experienced 61 years old pulled her back,but carried on working.Next shift the supervisor phoned her 3 times while she was heading to her list of calls to divert to others.Her attitude was so bad towards her she told her to forget it,she was coming back to the depot then going home,and she did.Shes now on the sick,and i doubt will return,shel do 6 months paid sick and leave. Another woman who was semi skilled phoned in sick she same day,and i doubt she will be back.One younger girl packed in after she had a baby and is only doing 16 hours with a local care firm now,she gets the same money on welfare.The bosses are all working from home and are getting their big salaries for nothing.They are close to retiring though and dont care.The service is close to collapse.My partner stays to build up final salary pension and because the 3 x 12 hour shifts a week suit us as with me not working now we can enjoy the days shes off,but if it gets much worse she will go on the sick herself Jumping into factories,almost every lower paid one around me are wanting people but cant get anyone decent.The youngsters drop shifts all the time,dont turn in,miss night shifts etc.One that supplies Nissan etc wants 50 production ops,but cant get them.Its £11 an hour,but they can get that at Amazon and now be filthy,and lots of nice women to chat up. The coast was full yesterday of people obvious on benefits,you women,probably never worked etc. The government are in for a massive shock.They think they can print instead of tax,but that is going to be removed soon,unless they force the BOE. There is simply not enough reward for work,and worse not enough difference between working and a single mother with two kids on welfare.Furlough etc has opened peoples eyes to how much they are giving up of their life for little or no reward.
    29 points
  3. Hi All, Meant to post back in December to thank foks and introduce myself. - but been caught up in the Covid forum. So I'm a long time Lurker to the basement. About 3.5 years ago I noticed that there were signs in the media that reminded me of 2006-7 and (The increase in personal debt and increase in house prices etc) Dissatisfaction with the mainstream narrative meant I started looking for something more .. nutritional! The Money saving expert forum led me to TOS and ultimatly stumbling accross the original thread an as a result Ive been following the last 3.5 years, with fascination. Like many long time lurkers I feel I dont have much to contribute, but as many have voiced - I have learnt a lot. Not just from the discussion/views and links posted here, but also from getting some books and self study so i can understand the jargon used within the financial/business world. In March last year I finaly plucked up the courage to get some "skin in the game" and opened an ISA with HL. Over the last 16 months have laddered into oil and Telco stocks and watched and wondered and looked at what causes the short term fluctuations in the stock market. I appreciate that feeling of having your investments in the "red" but try see it as the next ladder down oppertunity and the view it doesent matter as I am not (planning to) sell for another 4 years. Durhamborn's and others talk of ignoring the noise and looking at the big picture has been a sound mindset, particualry for a novice invester. There are 2 things i can contribute Macrovoices - I think it ws 3 weeks ago, Vickor Shvets seemed to be bang on what Durhamborn has been saying in terms of deflation/inflation and change. https://www.macrovoices.com/989-macrovoices-279-viktor-shvets-the-inflation-deflation-pendulum It was so interesting - I bought his book and will post in the Library when Ive finished, Having beeing following the covid thread since the beginning - I think that Covid/fiscal policy and the shift to digital currency are totaly linked. The Fiat collapse that may happen in the next decade is now just a matter of time. There are a lot of thread on this forum that are interlinked. Thanks for the open discussion and sharing of Ideas.
    26 points
  4. Thats right,and the more they become the market for government debt and push out private capital the more that capital looks for another home. Its the great irony of our system.The left pushes for higher and higher spending,but higher deficits simply mean higher asset values,so the more assets you own the more you make from government running a deficit.That is of course when you have over a billion Chinese workers and Eastern Europe to employ to do the work. The great macro pincer movement is now happening though where instead of simply pushing up asset values deficits push up inflation.The main thrust of this thread and actually my work the last several years,was that the backbone of the economy couldnt produce enough for the demands placed on it.Worse,as the cycle develops we are seeing production removed from the economy,not added,from massive increase in Chinese costs to workers shrugging their shoulders to crap pay and conditions. Longer term the CBs would love a digital currency and to do away with cash because it means they could move to negative interest rates.Forcing you to spend or invest so government can catch the tax.The only thing that stops them is the fact everyone would simply withdraw their money and keep as cash. Of course at that point China or Russia could launch their own crypto backed by gold and / or silver and the change in currency values would see a massive wealth transfer to them,systemic. Notice today as well Reckitt getting hit hard.Of course lots of excuses etc,but inflation will be starting to hit them.
    20 points
  5. Utter cunt.Iv been double jabbed,but il never show anyone any passport.Noticed today in Lidl half the shelves empty,and well over half now not wearing masks.Woman on the till didnt have one on,and i said it was lovely to see her pretty face again.Nobody will enforce it around here i never scanned in any pub,just pointed phone at the scan thing and pretended.Barmaids etc couldnt give shit.Track and trace hounded my dad to fill in the app when he tested positive,he said he didnt have one,so they phoned,he told them he couldnt remember anything or where he had been but Mrs Thatcher would sort things out and told them zero names.Almost everyone is deleting the NHS app now but a lot of people are also selling pings who test positive.Before they fill in the crap they are letting people scan phones etc so that they can then get 10 days off work or £500 off the government.Only people i see wearing a mask now are boomers no doubt scared to die and lose their huge DB pensions.
    20 points
  6. It would also be nice to see a vaguely independent assessment of the risk reward for various age groups.The vaccine isn't prefect by any stretch and there are clear dangers.UK yellow card system reporting 1470 detahs so far,linked to vaccine.WHere do you read that in the press? Over the last year,I've got really tired of hearing how young kids should be off school.LS reporting only 1.6% of kids test postive during isolation today. WHat I suspect we're seeing is a virus mutating into a weaker more infectious form. AS for your advice on whetehr to take the vaccine,I think you're more bag on than most of the doctors they parade on GMTV.Genuinely good advice that will stand the test of time imho. I'm noticing changes in attitudes at work -NHS.Lot of the younger members of staff are making quietly critical comments on the amount of money some people are getting on benefits-particularly the alcholics for instance who get disability-not for the alcholism but the problems caused by the alcohol-. Things are changing. ALso seeing a lot of people declining overtime.Last night shift I was on we had 60% of normal crew levels and we had 60% more work.Short story long,it was a stresful night and I totally get why we're losing staff.The money's crap until you've been in a few years and by then most people are burned out. A&E is getting smashed too.Lot of GP's not seeing many people. Must say,these lockdowns have a lot of unintended cosnsequences.I warned acquaintances who were pro lockdown what would happen a year down the line and here we are and it's even worse than I thought.
    19 points
  7. Fulky Agree. 'Doing' science is pretty simple: it's basically trial and error, build on what works. It's been done this way for a long time. Covid has been akin to the guy selling potions at the fairground "believe in me". I saw this on Twitter and nicked it: The left one is exactly how I was trained. It's pretty straightforward. The right one is Covid, think of that next time you hear or read "the science/experts say" etc. Part of it is becsuse the likes of Susan Michie who took over the narrative from Iodonnis early doors aren't even scientists. Behavioural psychologists were never trained with the left method, but they sure know how to nudge people through the fairground gates. The monorail guy from the Simpsons. That's who is running this shit show.
    17 points
  8. = The biggest civil unrest you have seen in your lifetime. Bring it on, I say.
    15 points
  9. Zero VAT on raw foodstuffs already. I have decided to remove myself from work and "society" for the time being. Everyone has gone mad.
    14 points
  10. What I want to know is where are all the human rights lawyers...the profession always prides itself on its ability to get people off due to "The letter of The Law", but they appear distinctly quiet on this issue!
    14 points
  11. I feel good knowing there are real people out there doing real stuff like this. Ex-military and now this, you've done us proud me son! May all your trades expire well in the money.
    13 points
  12. I'm starting to wonder if any of what we've discussed will be any use, really. Yeah sure my ISA and SIPP will look great, my stash will shine brilliantly (And may yet be used to "Bribe the guards" @DurhamBorn ) But the way things are going...what was the fucking point of any of it? I wasn't joking above, it's just my opinion of course - they really do need an excuse for the BK, and will never admit it was baked in from the start due to their decisions. My only hope is once it is over (Short and sharp as per David Hunter), this insanity can be put behind us, so we can get on with the insanity of pretending a gas plants breathe is killing the planet while the Sun is erroneous and we need to spend trillions on infrastructure because "It's just Science©, OK?" I never wanted to be RICH rich, I just wanted a degree of insulation from money worries etc but I suppose that was too much to ask /rant
    12 points
  13. I worked for GSK for over a decade,some of my old friends there are working on vaccines right now,adjuvant is actually been made in the same suite i used to make Imigran in a place called steriles.The vaccines are working fine and doing what they were designed to,stop as many deaths as they can.They arent designed to stop infection,that would be ludicrous and would never be an aim.That would come later,if at all.Most vaccine talk is utter bullshit.They are quite simple things unlike a lot of pharma. I had cancer and got an infection,a bad one,i would of died, i was injected with Zinacef,a cephalosporin.I asked for the bottle,id made the batch myself.I made 67k that day,67k people got that in hospital and for many it saved their life. The vaccines are a no brainer for over 45s,choice in over 30s,below probably not unless overweight.
    11 points
  14. With the lack of wind, if you listen closely, you can hear the feint sound of dividends flowing from O&G companies
    11 points
  15. I have no issue with Russian risk and am in the process of transferring my SIPP just so I can access the JP Morgan Russian Securities fund. I think all the risk is on the UK side, in terms of denying access in the future because 'Putin bad' or something. The Russians will pay up. I am very comfortable investing in an uninvadable country with no debt, a currency pretty much backed by gold, and probably the largest stash of in ground commodities in the world.
    11 points
  16. Guys, to the Covid forums please! @spunko Don't often think we need moderation around here, but some corralling of the cattle could be required...
    10 points
  17. 100%. Mine have changed from having a small self sustainable house in the hills to being more mobile, across countries if necessary. Its the gypsy life for me, suits me fine. I don't want any immobile asset because it will be heavily taxed and/or monitored.
    10 points
  18. On March 17 2020 Prof John Ioannidis wrote the following piece,effectievly arguing that the disaster was in the data they were using for the inital infection fatality rate He bascially argued for a 0.3% IFR based on a rough estimate for the Diamond Princess cruise ship a long way from the 3.4% inital WHO IFR estimate.(and the one instrumental in bringing in lockdowns).Read the rest of the first piece and you'll see why he earned his pre eminence in his profession because a year and a bit later,he looks to have been pretty well on the money about a raft of things as well the IFR The second paper is one published by the WHO that Prof Ioannidis updates his estimate for the IFR but with obviously much more data,published after being peer reviewed and updated Sept 13th 2020. https://www.statnews.com/2020/03/17/a-fiasco-in-the-making-as-the-coronavirus-pandemic-takes-hold-we-are-making-decisions-without-reliable-data/ The current coronavirus disease, Covid-19, has been called a once-in-a-century pandemic. But it may also be a once-in-a-century evidence fiasco. The data collected so far on how many people are infected and how the epidemic is evolving are utterly unreliable. Given the limited testing to date, some deaths and probably the vast majority of infections due to SARS-CoV-2 are being missed. We don’t know if we are failing to capture infections by a factor of three or 300. This evidence fiasco creates tremendous uncertainty about the risk of dying from Covid-19. Reported case fatality rates, like the official 3.4% rate from the World Health Organization, cause horror — and are meaningless. Projecting the Diamond Princess mortality rate onto the age structure of the U.S. population, the death rate among people infected with Covid-19 would be 0.125%. But since this estimate is based on extremely thin data — there were just seven deaths among the 700 infected passengers and crew — the real death rate could stretch from five times lower (0.025%) to five times higher (0.625%). Could the Covid-19 case fatality rate be that low? No, some say, pointing to the high rate in elderly people. However, even some so-called mild or common-cold-type coronaviruses that have been known for decades can have case fatality rates as high as 8% when they infect elderly people in nursing homes. In fact, such “mild” coronaviruses infect tens of millions of people every year, and account for 3% to 11% of those hospitalized in the U.S. with lower respiratory infections each winter. If we assume that case fatality rate among individuals infected by SARS-CoV-2 is 0.3% in the general population — a mid-range guess from my Diamond Princess analysis — and that 1% of the U.S. population gets infected (about 3.3 million people), this would translate to about 10,000 deaths. One of the bottom lines is that we don’t know how long social distancing measures and lockdowns can be maintained without major consequences to the economy, society, and mental health. Unpredictable evolutions may ensue, including financial crisis, unrest, civil strife, war, and a meltdown of the social fabric. At a minimum, we need unbiased prevalence and incidence data for the evolving infectious load to guide decision-making. In the most pessimistic scenario, which I do not espouse, if the new coronavirus infects 60% of the global population and 1% of the infected people die, that will translate into more than 40 million deaths globally, matching the 1918 influenza pandemic. The vast majority of this hecatomb would be people with limited life expectancies. That’s in contrast to 1918, when many young people died. One can only hope that, much like in 1918, life will continue. Conversely, with lockdowns of months, if not years, life largely stops, short-term and long-term consequences are entirely unknown, and billions, not just millions, of lives may be eventually at stake. If we decide to jump off the cliff, we need some data to inform us about the rationale of such an action and the chances of landing somewhere safe. John P.A. Ioannidis is professor of medicine and professor of epidemiology and population health, as well as professor by courtesy of biomedical data science at Stanford University School of Medicine, professor by courtesy of statistics at Stanford University School of Humanities and Sciences, and co-director of the Meta-Research Innovation Center at Stanford (METRICS) at Stanford University Prof John Ioannidis,Sep 13th 2020.Allowing for sampling errors IFR estimate at 0.2% https://www.who.int/bulletin/online_first/BLT.20.265892.pdf
    10 points
  19. It's the first rule of running a corrupt regime. The allocation of scarce resource based on political whim and favour.
    10 points
  20. Interesting from the Scottish Share today.Nuclear is the real winner from the energy transition and its highly likely the below is due to government having a word and asking them not to sell to the Chinese.It also suggests that they think the new Rolls Royce small reactors could be a go,maybe government subs?. "We have been re-considering whether Nuclear can play a role for Centrica in the future, having announced in 2018 that we intended to divest of 20% interest in the UK's operating nuclear fleet. Our focus remains on the customer, and as we look to help our customers reduce their carbon emissions, our Nuclear stake provides us with an important source of zero carbon electricity. Therefore, we may decide to retain our 20% interest."
    10 points
  21. A 9 hour cook, 2 hours rest. I was really happy with the results. Best one I have ever cooked. See
    9 points
  22. Marlboro maker calls for cigarette ban in Britain 'Cigarettes should be treated like electric cars and banned within a decade', say executives at tobacco company Philip Morris International ByOliver Gill, CHIEF BUSINESS CORRESPONDENT24 July 2021 • 7:00pm Britain should treat cigarettes like petrol cars and ban them in 10 years’ time, bosses at the world’s biggest listed tobacco company have said. André Calantzopoulos and Jacek Olczak, chairman and chief executive respectively of Philip Morris International, say a “carrot and stick” approach is required by the Government to force smokers to quit. Mr Olczak said: “We can see the world without cigarettes. And actually, the sooner it happens, the better it is for everyone.” Mr Calantzopoulos praised the UK’s “more progressive” approach to vapes and other products designed to wean people off smoking. He said a ban “could be one solution - but this is not enough”. “Deadlines are important at a certain stage so people [companies] know how much horizon they have,” he said. “It is not different from what [is being done] with alternative energies or with electric cars... [But you need to] stop the confusion that currently exists in the minds of smokers.” ADVERTISING Mr Olczak added: “If you take the current usage or awareness of alternatives and remove this confusion - quite a lot of people actually, still think that alternatives are worse than cigarettes - and you also give them a choice of smoke-free alternatives... with the right regulation and information it can happen 10 years from now in some countries. And you can solve the problem once and forever.” Philip Morris, the company behind Marlboro cigarettes, has faced a backlash from anti-smoking campaigners after launching a £1bn swoop for FTSE 250 drugmaker Vectura. The Chippenham-based firm develops drugs that combat smoking for the NHS. Ian Walker, an executive director at Cancer Research said tobacco giants were positioning themselves “as part of the solution to a smoke-free world, all the while continuing to aggressively sell and promote lethal cigarettes globally. “The industry has a long history of subverting tobacco control policies for its own financial gain, both in the UK and globally.” With temperatures near freezing, a handful of IBM consultants filed into Philip Morris’s glass-fronted offices on the banks of Lac de Neuchâtel in north-west Switzerland. As pharmaceutical specialists, they were intrigued by an appeal for help from one of the world’s biggest cigarette makers. Bosses at Philip Morris International, creator of “Marlboro Man” after its popular cigarette brand, had been trying to find out the primary cause of smoking-related diseases. The problem, the consultants were told at the 2004 meeting, was not tobacco or nicotine, per se. Instead it was burning, and the smoke that came with it. “They had been looking to see what technologies could be used that could deliver what smokers are looking for: the satisfaction of nicotine, the taste and flavour, and the ritual that smokers like,” says one of the consultants. A cigarette production line at Philip Morris International in Medellin, Colombia. CREDIT: Nicolo Filippo Rosso/Bloomberg “I came on to the project with a bunch of colleagues to basically re-engineer the R&D facility – and function much more like a pharmaceutical company.” Earlier this month Philip Morris agreed a £1bn swoop for Chippenham-based drugmaker Vectura, which focuses on creating inhaler-based treatments for illnesses such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In light of the manoeuvrings by the Swiss-headquartered firm 17 years earlier, the only surprise for some insiders was that it had taken this long to do such a deal. The backlash has been fierce, however. How could Philip Morris, the world’s biggest tobacco company, be allowed to buy a firm that provides medicines to the NHS to combat diseases caused by smoking, critics asked? The company was accused of “buying into the heart of the pharmaceutical industry” by anti-smoking campaigners who urged the Government to intervene and block the deal. Bosses at Philip Morris insist the Vectura deal is part of its goal to become a “wellness company”, and stated ambition in “delivering a smoke-free future”. “Where do we go?” asks André Calantzopoulos, chairman of Philip Morris, venting his frustration at being told he cannot diversify into pharmaceuticals. “Then there are some other critics who are telling me alternatives to smoking, [the tobacco] industry shouldn’t be allowed to do.” “So what I am left with is continuing selling cigarettes. We just get back to the point [that] we are actually trying to leave!” The notion of Big Tobacco looking beyond cigarettes is not new. Philip Morris has owned Miller Brewing and Kraft Foods – the latter floating as recently as 2001 in what was then the second-biggest stock market listing of all time. British American Tobacco (BAT), London’s biggest listed tobacco company, owned retailers Argos and Saks Fifth Avenue in the 1970s and combined Eagle Star, Allied Dunbar and Farmers Group a decade later to form the UK’s biggest insurance group. In recent years Big Tobacco has largely returned to its roots, with an arsenal of vaping, heated tobacco and nicotine pouch products. Pharmaceuticals appear to be the next frontier – at the moment only Philip Morris has delved into the sector. Armed with gargantuan marketing budgets, health campaigners are sceptical of Big Tobacco’s intentions. Ian Walker, an executive director at Cancer Research, is concerned that companies are positioning themselves “as part of the solution to a smoke-free world, all the while continuing to aggressively sell and promote lethal cigarettes globally”. Big Tobacco continues to make big profits. BAT is this week expected to report £5.2bn of operating profit on £12bn of sales – an eye-watering margin that its FTSE 100 rivals could only dream of. Ahead of this, Vuse, BAT’s vaping product, embarked on a publicity stunt on the River Thames. Laying claim to be the first carbon neutral brand of its type, a Vuse-liveried sailing boat passed through the gates of Tower Bridge – much to the chagrin of angry taxi drivers, whose diesel-guzzling black cabs pumped out noxious fumes as they stood idling. Kingsley Wheaton, BAT’s chief marketing officer, understands the scepticism but insists companies like his are best placed to wean people off cigarettes. He points out that although cigarette sales are falling, the number of global smokers – roughly 1.1bn – has remained static for some time. “In 2012 I was handed a [World Health Organisation] forecast of the number of smokers by 2050, and it was ostensibly flat. Tobacco control policy of its day, and still of now, is the one of ‘quit or die’,” he says. “And I don’t believe ‘quit or die’ is an effective public health policy. The effective policy is giving consumers alternative ways to enjoy tobacco, nicotine with less of the harm. And that’s what we’re doing.” To prove the veracity of lofty straplines like “creating a better tomorrow”, industry critics say tobacco companies should either stop selling cigarettes, or at the very least sell off their cigarette-making arms. The former idea will not solve the problem, says Wheaton. “If you take South Africa last year, we had a smoking ban for four-and-a-half months because of Covid; consumption didn’t decline at all. The void was just filled by counterfeit, contraband, smuggling and illicit traders.” Selling off their business is also unappealing. “Not in the foreseeable future,” says Murray McGowan, strategy director at BAT’s FTSE 100 rival Imperial Brands. “Cash flow from our combustible business is absolutely fundamental to our ability to invest into the development of our [next generation products] business.” Wheaton suggests a sell-off might not yield a good price. “You have to have willing buyers and willing sellers,” he says. “And when we talk about ‘creating a better tomorrow’, we are talking about ‘creating a better tomorrow’ for multiple stakeholders. We have employees, we have society, we have consumers. And we do have a fiduciary responsibility to our shareholders.” While only Philip Morris is pushing into the pharmaceutical sector, BAT and Imperial Brands have interests in cannabis derivatives, which are legal across Canada and parts of the US. Japan Tobacco International (JTI), with brands such as Benson & Hedges and Silk Cut making it the biggest cigarette seller in the UK, is more defensive. A spokesman says: “We are a legitimate business in a legal industry just like beverage companies. They, like us, have introduced potentially less harmful products such as sugar-free or alcohol-free drinks to cater to changing consumer choices and lifestyles. As a legitimate company selling legal products, we should be able to provide adult consumers with innovative and potentially less harmful products.” Critics like Walker are unconvinced: “The industry has a long history of subverting tobacco control policies for its own financial gain, both in the UK and globally, and so protecting public health from its vested interests is crucial.”
    9 points
  23. Why not reduce VAT on fruit and veg, and make local authority leisure/sports centres free of charge.......oh no, letsake it twice as complicated so their `friends` in Capita and Serco can `milk` the tax payer!
    9 points
  24. Oh they have a ‘clue’ what’s going on alright.
    9 points
  25. Inflation mostly.With dis-inflation they have massive room to print.Thats what the whole last cycle was about.The west,and the UK have pretty much printed while the Chinese worked.That is coming to an end now.This started in 82 and ends in 21 or 22.There is massive liquidity in the system ,enough for velocity to get moving as it will.They will re-start if we get a crash ,but if inflation is still high it will be one off bursts.Inflation causes all kinds of problems.Even today NHS managers get 3%,police nothing in pay increases.Tensions everywhere.CBs have been taken over by governments for fiscal injections as we predicted,but they are close to the point where it will move to tax rather than print.
    9 points
  26. This is the worst conservative government iv ever seen by a very large margin and yet a billion times better than Labour.The red wall seats all fell around me because people are sick of scroungers.Those landing on boats,and those home born.The government have no backbone at all though and have created a huge mess.Shelves are half empty yet nobody wants to work.It will need the BOE to pull back from QE to then focus the mind.My partner is a nurse but working for the council in a responder role.They are really short staffed and all their bosses are sat at home on huge salaries doing nothing at all really.They advertised jobs,but only 2 candidates were suitable,and one decided they didnt want the job.So a big push got them one employee when they needed 8.Almost all my partners workmates are wanting to retire soon and starting to go on the sick every few months to force the issue. This is what happens when people see others better off than them for doing nothing at all.
    9 points
  27. BHP are looking to sell their entire oil and gas division. They got into it accidentally, and were never very good at it. Gazprom is direct exposure if you are ok with Russia risk, while BASF (via Wintershall DEA has good exposure to gas). Energean is another one on the LSE if you want direct exposure (I don't own Energean as I think it's a bit expensive).
    8 points
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