dgul

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  1. Agree
    dgul got a reaction from the gardener in Done for murdering a child in Spain? Not a problem, here have a job in a primary school   
    It is something I find very worrying.
    Immigrants have the same rights as the indigenous, but there is a world of difference:
    The indigenous have a lifetime of checks on them.  You can't just do something bad and then disappear (well, it is very difficult).  This extends to things like education attainment, work experience, etc, etc. The immigrant has a much lower check rate.  They can come to the UK with a complex history and there's a fairly good chance that it won't be identified as they come into the UK.  They can make stuff up, gloss over problems and even if you try to check the language problems often makes people give up (eg translate education certificates and understand foreign education standards).   So to me it seems sensible to do things like having much harder checks on immigrants compared with locals.  But that's seen as racist so it never happens, and when it does (through various means) then the shout of 'racist' is even louder. 
    [Today we've got a great example -- https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/av/uk-48653150/bame-doctors-more-likely-to-be-investigated-than-white-ones:  Figures obtained by a BBC Freedom of Information request suggest the GMC is more likely to investigate complaints against BAME doctors than those who are white.  Black and Asian doctors make up around a third of the workforce in the UK but are over-represented in fitness to practice cases.  Now, UK BAME should have the same investigation rate as white, but the 'third of workforce' tells us that there are loads and loads of foreign trained and experienced doctors in the UK (we knew that anyway), and these will have an element of their history that is unknown or difficult to identify -- thus you'd absolutely expect investigation rates to be higher.  But, of course, the result of this 'racist' is that investigation rates for BAME will be reduced, giving a lower check rate than whites once the impact of unknown elements of their history is factored in]
  2. Agree
    dgul got a reaction from Alonso Quijano in Done for murdering a child in Spain? Not a problem, here have a job in a primary school   
    It is something I find very worrying.
    Immigrants have the same rights as the indigenous, but there is a world of difference:
    The indigenous have a lifetime of checks on them.  You can't just do something bad and then disappear (well, it is very difficult).  This extends to things like education attainment, work experience, etc, etc. The immigrant has a much lower check rate.  They can come to the UK with a complex history and there's a fairly good chance that it won't be identified as they come into the UK.  They can make stuff up, gloss over problems and even if you try to check the language problems often makes people give up (eg translate education certificates and understand foreign education standards).   So to me it seems sensible to do things like having much harder checks on immigrants compared with locals.  But that's seen as racist so it never happens, and when it does (through various means) then the shout of 'racist' is even louder. 
    [Today we've got a great example -- https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/av/uk-48653150/bame-doctors-more-likely-to-be-investigated-than-white-ones:  Figures obtained by a BBC Freedom of Information request suggest the GMC is more likely to investigate complaints against BAME doctors than those who are white.  Black and Asian doctors make up around a third of the workforce in the UK but are over-represented in fitness to practice cases.  Now, UK BAME should have the same investigation rate as white, but the 'third of workforce' tells us that there are loads and loads of foreign trained and experienced doctors in the UK (we knew that anyway), and these will have an element of their history that is unknown or difficult to identify -- thus you'd absolutely expect investigation rates to be higher.  But, of course, the result of this 'racist' is that investigation rates for BAME will be reduced, giving a lower check rate than whites once the impact of unknown elements of their history is factored in]
  3. Agree
    dgul got a reaction from Van Lady in Done for murdering a child in Spain? Not a problem, here have a job in a primary school   
    It is something I find very worrying.
    Immigrants have the same rights as the indigenous, but there is a world of difference:
    The indigenous have a lifetime of checks on them.  You can't just do something bad and then disappear (well, it is very difficult).  This extends to things like education attainment, work experience, etc, etc. The immigrant has a much lower check rate.  They can come to the UK with a complex history and there's a fairly good chance that it won't be identified as they come into the UK.  They can make stuff up, gloss over problems and even if you try to check the language problems often makes people give up (eg translate education certificates and understand foreign education standards).   So to me it seems sensible to do things like having much harder checks on immigrants compared with locals.  But that's seen as racist so it never happens, and when it does (through various means) then the shout of 'racist' is even louder. 
    [Today we've got a great example -- https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/av/uk-48653150/bame-doctors-more-likely-to-be-investigated-than-white-ones:  Figures obtained by a BBC Freedom of Information request suggest the GMC is more likely to investigate complaints against BAME doctors than those who are white.  Black and Asian doctors make up around a third of the workforce in the UK but are over-represented in fitness to practice cases.  Now, UK BAME should have the same investigation rate as white, but the 'third of workforce' tells us that there are loads and loads of foreign trained and experienced doctors in the UK (we knew that anyway), and these will have an element of their history that is unknown or difficult to identify -- thus you'd absolutely expect investigation rates to be higher.  But, of course, the result of this 'racist' is that investigation rates for BAME will be reduced, giving a lower check rate than whites once the impact of unknown elements of their history is factored in]
  4. Agree
    dgul got a reaction from One percent in Done for murdering a child in Spain? Not a problem, here have a job in a primary school   
    It is something I find very worrying.
    Immigrants have the same rights as the indigenous, but there is a world of difference:
    The indigenous have a lifetime of checks on them.  You can't just do something bad and then disappear (well, it is very difficult).  This extends to things like education attainment, work experience, etc, etc. The immigrant has a much lower check rate.  They can come to the UK with a complex history and there's a fairly good chance that it won't be identified as they come into the UK.  They can make stuff up, gloss over problems and even if you try to check the language problems often makes people give up (eg translate education certificates and understand foreign education standards).   So to me it seems sensible to do things like having much harder checks on immigrants compared with locals.  But that's seen as racist so it never happens, and when it does (through various means) then the shout of 'racist' is even louder. 
    [Today we've got a great example -- https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/av/uk-48653150/bame-doctors-more-likely-to-be-investigated-than-white-ones:  Figures obtained by a BBC Freedom of Information request suggest the GMC is more likely to investigate complaints against BAME doctors than those who are white.  Black and Asian doctors make up around a third of the workforce in the UK but are over-represented in fitness to practice cases.  Now, UK BAME should have the same investigation rate as white, but the 'third of workforce' tells us that there are loads and loads of foreign trained and experienced doctors in the UK (we knew that anyway), and these will have an element of their history that is unknown or difficult to identify -- thus you'd absolutely expect investigation rates to be higher.  But, of course, the result of this 'racist' is that investigation rates for BAME will be reduced, giving a lower check rate than whites once the impact of unknown elements of their history is factored in]
  5. Agree
    dgul got a reaction from Virgil Caine in Wheels coming off HE bubble   
    Complicated courses cost money.  Doesn't matter if it is surgery or some weird African dialect.  I'm happy to sub this money from my taxes to meet actual demand in the UK. The problem is spending this money (and, indeed, subbing cheap courses) far beyond the capacity of the country to take advantage of that education.
  6. Agree
    dgul got a reaction from Van Lady in Wheels coming off HE bubble   
    SOAS is the same tale as pretty much all other HE establishments in the UK -- there is no doubt that there is a need for their output; the problem is that they have grown so much over the last 30 years that the supply now vastly exceeds the need.  If SOAS had the same student numbers as they had in 1987 (say) then there'd not really be any problem.
  7. Cheers
    dgul got a reaction from The Generation Game 🙌 in What are you celebrating today?   
    Father's day!  Yeah!
    Wife has taken the kids off for the main part of the day leaving me in peace!
  8. Agree
    dgul reacted to Frank Hovis in End to free TV licenses for over 75s   
    Sad as it is I think that's how Spy would have wanted to go.
    Mid-post with every word finally spelled correctly.
  9. Agree
    dgul got a reaction from LC1 in Plug and play solar for the DOSBODS 'homeworker', renter.   
    Quite.  I'd note that if you're doing a DIY job then it might be easier to put the panels on a shed or something -- makes it a much easier job than getting on roof.
    I'm doing the same.  I find it amazingly annoying how you have to pay so much just to get a certificate for the FIT payments -- of course, this is how the installers work -- work out the benefit to the customer and back calculate the costs that would give a decent ROI.
    The particularly annoying thing is that I'm paying (through general elec. bills) for the FIT for those who got the panels put in professionally, and (indirectly) for the lifestyle of the company directors who took the cash and ran.  
    Frankly, we (as a country) would have been better off just waiting for costs to reduce to the point where it was an obvious investment.  Instead we've got a large historical cost to pay off, and no real benefit over just doing it now (at massively reduced cost).
    Perhaps we should be doing the same (ie, waiting) in other areas (electric cars?)
  10. Agree
    dgul got a reaction from Ash4781b in UK Government Blew Billions on “Help to Buy” Scheme that Enriched Home Builders and Drove Up Home Prices. Taxpayers on the Hook When Prices Sink, New Report Warns   
    Everything I read about it at the time was critical.  Most reports went with the 'help to sell' meme.
    But yet again this is a 'no-one knew' situation that'll merely recommend actions for the future rather than actually take people to account for what was obviously a bung for the housebuilders.
  11. Agree
    dgul got a reaction from M S E Refugee in The Village People   
    That's because no-one knows what the local accent sounds like any more.
    [That's true around here -- all the 'locals' think the few actual locals are from much further west, whereas in fact that's just what the old East Wilts accent sounds like.  The people who think they're locals don't really have an accent]
  12. Agree
    dgul got a reaction from One percent in Strange things afoot in Trimsaran - Terror raid on farm. Report of Chemicals   
    30 years ago, yes.  These days there have been so many incomers, many of whom are transient, that they've given up saying anything.  Of course, they keep on saying stuff down the pub, but that's just interpreted as racism and is ignored.
  13. Agree
    dgul got a reaction from gibbon in Bus bashing..   
    It's turned from a nasty little incident on a bus that shouldn't have happened but that we've probably all had*, into some kind of show trial of men.
    [* it isn't homophobia.  They'll have been nasty little twerps that would have have turned on anything.]
  14. Agree
    dgul got a reaction from The Idiocrat in UK Government Blew Billions on “Help to Buy” Scheme that Enriched Home Builders and Drove Up Home Prices. Taxpayers on the Hook When Prices Sink, New Report Warns   
    Everything I read about it at the time was critical.  Most reports went with the 'help to sell' meme.
    But yet again this is a 'no-one knew' situation that'll merely recommend actions for the future rather than actually take people to account for what was obviously a bung for the housebuilders.
  15. Agree
    dgul got a reaction from Malthus in UK Government Blew Billions on “Help to Buy” Scheme that Enriched Home Builders and Drove Up Home Prices. Taxpayers on the Hook When Prices Sink, New Report Warns   
    Everything I read about it at the time was critical.  Most reports went with the 'help to sell' meme.
    But yet again this is a 'no-one knew' situation that'll merely recommend actions for the future rather than actually take people to account for what was obviously a bung for the housebuilders.
  16. Agree
    dgul got a reaction from Chewing Grass in Wheels coming off HE bubble   
    TSD is a disaster zone.  
    Lampeter (St Davids) is the university that in the olden days that would take all the dimwits* that couldn't get into a proper university but where mum&dad** insisted they didn't go to a poly.   Once the polys became universities Lampeter St Davids*** lost their reason for existing.  [They've been bailed out by Saudi money but it really isn't enough and anyway the Saudis seem to be more interested in Carmarthen these days]  I don't see how it can survive (although the main building is rather nice). [* apart from theology.  But that's more of a 'disappear into the wilds' sort of thing -- not quite Lindisfarne, but nearly as good as.]
    [** Well, there were also the kids where mum&dad wanted them somewhere isolated so that they couldn't get into trouble, but who didn't realise that is where all the LSD came from.]
    [*** Lampeter St Davids.  LSD.  Coincidence?  I think not]
    Carmarthen (Trinity) was never an anything, and to call it a university is bonkers.  It has a place as a local tech college for the farmer's kids to learn welding.  It does have a nice main building, however. Swansea (Metropolitan) was the amalgamation of the teacher training place for crap teachers, the arts school for crap artists and the tech college that actually taught practical tech skills (which they don't do any more, afaikt).  I'm pretty sure that people only go because they're too stupid to realise they're not going to Swansea university (itself a place of no hope, but at least it wasn't as bad as Swansea Metropolitan).  It used to have a nice building or two, but have since spunked their money on a Barrat style new campus where kids can go to get depressed.g Not only will TSD not be able to survive the coming education maelstrom (which even the UK education industry accept is on the way), but it's demise will only serve to increase the average output of the UK HE sector.
     
  17. Agree
    dgul got a reaction from LC1 in Bus bashing..   
    I dunno.
    Part of me thinks that they were beaten by some thugs out for blood, and if it wasn't them it would be just about anyone else that they could pick a fight with.  I suppose the question might be: how many young men are beaten up on the night bus but there's no reporting because they're just men. Part of me thinks that it is a dreadful attack; there's no place for homophobia.  I recall years ago my mate telling me about how he couldn't show any affection to his boyfriend when out and about -- we've come a long way in just a few years, but this shows that threats remain. Part of me thinks that they're both pretty and it is a shame that they didn't just have a dirty snog and the footage of that put online. Part of me is thinking that lesbians don't exist.
  18. Agree
    dgul got a reaction from The Masked Tulip in Bus bashing..   
    It's turned from a nasty little incident on a bus that shouldn't have happened but that we've probably all had*, into some kind of show trial of men.
    [* it isn't homophobia.  They'll have been nasty little twerps that would have have turned on anything.]
  19. Agree
    dgul reacted to The Generation Game 🙌 in Oxford street   
    Squirrels fighting (possibly against Chris?) in the driver's compartment of a routemaster would be my guess. Probably high on Tramadol. 
  20. Agree
    dgul reacted to spygirl in Bus bashing..   
    My guess is that the people on the bus called something, the blonde one went to have words then hit one of the people, who twatted her back, giving her a nose bleed, and the dark haired one got blood on her from that.
    My guess is was not an targeted assault on them. Rather,, some dick head name calling, followed by an assault and response. And nothing more.
     
  21. Agree
    dgul got a reaction from BurntBread in Wheels coming off HE bubble   
    TSD is a disaster zone.  
    Lampeter (St Davids) is the university that in the olden days that would take all the dimwits* that couldn't get into a proper university but where mum&dad** insisted they didn't go to a poly.   Once the polys became universities Lampeter St Davids*** lost their reason for existing.  [They've been bailed out by Saudi money but it really isn't enough and anyway the Saudis seem to be more interested in Carmarthen these days]  I don't see how it can survive (although the main building is rather nice). [* apart from theology.  But that's more of a 'disappear into the wilds' sort of thing -- not quite Lindisfarne, but nearly as good as.]
    [** Well, there were also the kids where mum&dad wanted them somewhere isolated so that they couldn't get into trouble, but who didn't realise that is where all the LSD came from.]
    [*** Lampeter St Davids.  LSD.  Coincidence?  I think not]
    Carmarthen (Trinity) was never an anything, and to call it a university is bonkers.  It has a place as a local tech college for the farmer's kids to learn welding.  It does have a nice main building, however. Swansea (Metropolitan) was the amalgamation of the teacher training place for crap teachers, the arts school for crap artists and the tech college that actually taught practical tech skills (which they don't do any more, afaikt).  I'm pretty sure that people only go because they're too stupid to realise they're not going to Swansea university (itself a place of no hope, but at least it wasn't as bad as Swansea Metropolitan).  It used to have a nice building or two, but have since spunked their money on a Barrat style new campus where kids can go to get depressed.g Not only will TSD not be able to survive the coming education maelstrom (which even the UK education industry accept is on the way), but it's demise will only serve to increase the average output of the UK HE sector.
     
  22. Agree
    dgul got a reaction from Bedrag Justesen in Wheels coming off HE bubble   
    TSD is a disaster zone.  
    Lampeter (St Davids) is the university that in the olden days that would take all the dimwits* that couldn't get into a proper university but where mum&dad** insisted they didn't go to a poly.   Once the polys became universities Lampeter St Davids*** lost their reason for existing.  [They've been bailed out by Saudi money but it really isn't enough and anyway the Saudis seem to be more interested in Carmarthen these days]  I don't see how it can survive (although the main building is rather nice). [* apart from theology.  But that's more of a 'disappear into the wilds' sort of thing -- not quite Lindisfarne, but nearly as good as.]
    [** Well, there were also the kids where mum&dad wanted them somewhere isolated so that they couldn't get into trouble, but who didn't realise that is where all the LSD came from.]
    [*** Lampeter St Davids.  LSD.  Coincidence?  I think not]
    Carmarthen (Trinity) was never an anything, and to call it a university is bonkers.  It has a place as a local tech college for the farmer's kids to learn welding.  It does have a nice main building, however. Swansea (Metropolitan) was the amalgamation of the teacher training place for crap teachers, the arts school for crap artists and the tech college that actually taught practical tech skills (which they don't do any more, afaikt).  I'm pretty sure that people only go because they're too stupid to realise they're not going to Swansea university (itself a place of no hope, but at least it wasn't as bad as Swansea Metropolitan).  It used to have a nice building or two, but have since spunked their money on a Barrat style new campus where kids can go to get depressed.g Not only will TSD not be able to survive the coming education maelstrom (which even the UK education industry accept is on the way), but it's demise will only serve to increase the average output of the UK HE sector.
     
  23. Agree
    dgul got a reaction from One percent in You can take the boy out of Somalia ...   
    Not specifically relevant to the running chap who achieved a miraculous improvement in performance while away somewhere where other people might have taken testosterone, and seemed to always be out whenever the drugs testing people called round, and who did take something that wasn't recorded at least once (but that was just a lapse), and who may or may not have assaulted people on a more recent training camp, and who might have had the benefit of the UK taxpayer supporting him but who takes great pains to avoid contributing taxes back, but who most definitely has never taken performance enhancing drugs*.
    [* according to Britain's favourite non-cycling athlete who isn't one of the actually nice ones, the right honourable Sir Mohamed Muktar Jama Farah, CBE]
    I see while reading some local rags (that aren't local to me) that Tanzania has decided that Somalia is now a safe country and all the refugees can return.  https://www.thecitizen.co.tz/news/Tanzania-to-repatriate-thousands-of-refugees-whose-countries-/1840340-5152910-m13pwm/index.html  Now, I appreciate that lots of people have built a new life abroad, but who's going to help rebuild the war-torn country?  Presumably we've got loads of Somalis who we've spent training on how to help rebuild their country, and who have been saving up their £s so that they can have a decent start when they return**.  Or is it that we now say 'they're ours now, stuff off', and leave the country to be rebuilt by those that struggled to stay.
    And (without specific reference to the running chap), to those that say 'he's done so much for the country' I'd say what makes it such that Britain can steal him from his country of birth?  Perhaps it is important that Somalia gets a chance to get some Olympic medals, and he could help with their training efforts for the next generation.  
    I'd accept that it is 'a difficult moral question', but I'd also suggest that it definitely isn't as simple as 'they're ours now' -- our obligations to the world don't end with accepting people to wash our cars for us and telling other countries to stuff off because they're ours now, no matter how moral their cause.
    [** sorry, forgot that we don't actually do that.  I've no idea why not.]
  24. Agree
    dgul got a reaction from UnconventionalWisdom in The UK borrows at up to 1.37% whilst charging students between 3.3% and 6.3%   
    The interest rates for student loans is intrinsically wrong.
    What is interest on a loan for?  It covers two components -- the risk free rate, which is the 'value of money' plus the risk premium, which is the additional amount to cover a risk that the loan won't be paid off (in part or in full).  Now, this approach works perfectly for most borrowers, for countries (bonds), houses (mortgages) and even payday lenders.
    This approach to interest works so well that it is 'obvious' -- that is, no-one actually thinks about what interest means.  It is just a thing that you add to a loan. 
    But student loans are different.  The 'risk premium' is nonsensical -- borrowers have to pay back by law, it is claimed before money actually hits pocket (paye) and it can't be discharged through bankruptcy.  Sure, some (many) won't pay it all back, but that could be identified at the point of taking out the loan.  And that is the crazy thing -- we deliberately ignore the risk premium that is identifiable at the point of issuing the debt, and load the risk onto all.  Or, perhaps, we deliberately make 'good' students (who'll get a job etc) pay for 'bad' students (who it is clear won't get a well paid job through their degree) just because it is a social policy of government to get as many children as possible to do a degree, no matter how pointless.This is doubly bonkers when you consider that the 'good' people aren't just good for themselves, but also the very ones that the country will benefit from having educated.
    To me there can be no justification for adding a risk premium to all graduate loans.  It really has to be separated out.  Students should borrow at the same rate that the government can borrow at -- as the risk premium is actually identical to the country's risk premium (or, rather, that the 'good' borrowers have an identical risk premium, and the 'bad' borrowers are put up with for some reason).  I might think that we shouldn't offer student loans to individuals where there isn't a a decent chance of getting a job to pay back the loan, but that is a nuance -- at the moment 'we agree' that all should have the opportunity for HE.
    So, I suggest the following as a solution:
    A loan taken out to do the degree, with interest* at the same rate as a 25 year gilt. An additional higher education tax, paid for by all, specifically to cover non-performing student loans. The point would be that the 'tax' part wouldn't be about funding HE, as all the graduates with decent jobs would pay off the loan for their degree -- it would specifically be for the funding of degrees that result in the graduate not earning very much.  ie, the tax would be paid by all solely to cover our politicians' enthusiasm for getting the dimmest fuckwits** into college.  I think that would focus minds a bit.
    [* I'd fix it for term at the 25 year rate at the point of taking out the loan, but that's a nuance.]
    [** sure, it would also cover people that can't pay off their loans due to disease or injury, or those that suddenly desire to become a monk after their degree.  But mainly it would cover fuckwits.]
  25. Agree
    dgul got a reaction from Inoperational Bumblebee in Muslim parents lead group of 300 in protest outside school gates against equality lessons on homosexuality and gender   
    I think that's fair.
    I am in support of the education of children about 'other people'.  In that I'd include gays, religion, race, etc.
    I am particularly in support about education of children about the existence of homosexuality because it is something that often doesn't exist in a child's wider existence.  Children know that their mates sometimes have different colour skin or perhaps wear 'funny clothes sometimes', but no child under the age of about 15 has a gay friend (despite what people go on about).  But homosexuality isn't a special case -- they might as well be taught about all these things.
    [teaching children about 'gay' in primary school doesn't go into bum sex, just as they don't go on about blow-jobs.  It is just that sometimes a man will love another man (& lesbians same).  I can't see how that can in any way be offensive or controversial.]
    I'd also add that teaching about the existence of homosexuality will not make children gay.  Not even older children.  Oh, they might go on about how they 'love their best friend', but that's just because they've not yet learnt about pussy (for boys), cock (for girls).  The growing child will work out what their sexuality is when the time is right, and no amount of indoctrination will make a straight older teen boy want to give up a chance of pussy (& girls cock).  Similarly, no amount of shame/legal-stuff will make a gay boy want to not love other gay men, although it can bring about generations of unhappy gay men in sexless marriages with mostly unhappy women.
    But if there is to be education on such matters (religion, sexuality, etc), it absolutely has to be for all.  Because it is the very ones that will withdraw their children are the ones who really need the exposure to tolerance.  Hard line Muslims are the ones teaching their children about how Ahmadi Muslims should be killed, extreme Christians tell their kids not to talk to Jehovah Witnesses, whatever.