dgul

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  1. Upvote
    dgul got a reaction from Van Lady in VAT for private schools -- Hammond again   
    Oh, the system is properly broken.  In every sector expenditure is vastly more than it used to be, without any obvious benefit (eg, education spend is 2x per pupil than 20 years ago, but I don't see the youth as being 2x better -- slightly worse if anything).  Contribution based welfare would solve many problems (and would have stopped many of the problems that have emerged in recent years)
    But the solution to this problem isn't to say 'sure, we'll give you a rebate if you find a better alternative', the solution is to fix the problem.
    Anyway, the way to think of education isn't 'if/when I have children the 'education' share of my lifetime tax contribution (before and after) pays for their education'.  it is rather I live in a country where there are benefits all round if people are educated.  If I'm poor I'll be one of the educated.  If I'm wealthy they'll work in my factories and offices.  If I'm middle class they'll be my suppliers and customers.  Some of them will become innovators and get me great benefits from the fantastic products they invent, others will become artists and entertain me.  Scientists will push forwards the boundaries and the guy who comes to fix my boiler will be able to read the documentation to fix it and follow legislation.  Some will squander their education, but I don't know which ones will need it, and the majority will need it, so I'll have to take the risk and provide it to everyone.  I have no choice but to pay out for this education for others, otherwise civilisation will start to fall apart.  The great thing about this education is that children get it for free -- in fact, it is crucial that children get it for free.   But, if I choose to not give my children access to this free education (for them) I don't get the money back, because I don't pay for them, I pay for everyone.
    [And that is why I oppose student fees.  I do, however, disagree with HE for everyone -- by 18 you know which ones are likely to provide value to the country with having a continuation of education]
  2. Upvote
    dgul got a reaction from Inoperational Bumblebee in Credit deflation and the reflation cycle to come.   
    Instead of finding ways to make driving around ever more effortless and convenient, we should be finding ways to remove the need for moving around so much.
  3. Upvote
    dgul got a reaction from Van Lady in VAT for private schools -- Hammond again   
    Oh, the system is properly broken.  In every sector expenditure is vastly more than it used to be, without any obvious benefit (eg, education spend is 2x per pupil than 20 years ago, but I don't see the youth as being 2x better -- slightly worse if anything).  Contribution based welfare would solve many problems (and would have stopped many of the problems that have emerged in recent years)
    But the solution to this problem isn't to say 'sure, we'll give you a rebate if you find a better alternative', the solution is to fix the problem.
    Anyway, the way to think of education isn't 'if/when I have children the 'education' share of my lifetime tax contribution (before and after) pays for their education'.  it is rather I live in a country where there are benefits all round if people are educated.  If I'm poor I'll be one of the educated.  If I'm wealthy they'll work in my factories and offices.  If I'm middle class they'll be my suppliers and customers.  Some of them will become innovators and get me great benefits from the fantastic products they invent, others will become artists and entertain me.  Scientists will push forwards the boundaries and the guy who comes to fix my boiler will be able to read the documentation to fix it and follow legislation.  Some will squander their education, but I don't know which ones will need it, and the majority will need it, so I'll have to take the risk and provide it to everyone.  I have no choice but to pay out for this education for others, otherwise civilisation will start to fall apart.  The great thing about this education is that children get it for free -- in fact, it is crucial that children get it for free.   But, if I choose to not give my children access to this free education (for them) I don't get the money back, because I don't pay for them, I pay for everyone.
    [And that is why I oppose student fees.  I do, however, disagree with HE for everyone -- by 18 you know which ones are likely to provide value to the country with having a continuation of education]
  4. Upvote
    dgul got a reaction from Frank Hovis in New Moon on Monday   
    The news media is clearly filled with gullible idiots.  RT did this linky, but the So-Called BBC and others were the same, simply regurgitating the news release.  There's so much 'unbelievable' in this, and I don't mean 'wildly enthusiastic' but actually not believable.
    For a start, it would need to be at 23,000 miles up, not the '500 miles'.  Then it would need to be absolutely ginormously vast.  Then the angle of reflection would have to be held accurate to tiny fractions of a degree (not the 'close enough' of normal satellites.
    It isn't that it can't be done -- it is that it is so bonkersly far away from what is possible.   I know that it is an amusing story, but where is the role in the news media is at least nudging towards 'you know that they're mad, right?'
    [My mum would believe it, but she thinks the moon is a few miles up and made of cheese anyway]
  5. Upvote
    dgul reacted to blobloblob in Vrooooom, vrooooooooom   
    Literally every single other form of motor racing, from Nascar to Moto GP; from touring cars to stock car racing, is more interesting than formula one. It is without exception the dullest way people can race one another in motor vehicles.
  6. Upvote
    dgul got a reaction from Van Lady in £250K to rent a unit in a shopping centre   
    Can't someone somewhere please make local councils stop speculating with my cash and get back to old-fashioned service provision.
  7. Upvote
    dgul got a reaction from Frank Hovis in New Moon on Monday   
    The news media is clearly filled with gullible idiots.  RT did this linky, but the So-Called BBC and others were the same, simply regurgitating the news release.  There's so much 'unbelievable' in this, and I don't mean 'wildly enthusiastic' but actually not believable.
    For a start, it would need to be at 23,000 miles up, not the '500 miles'.  Then it would need to be absolutely ginormously vast.  Then the angle of reflection would have to be held accurate to tiny fractions of a degree (not the 'close enough' of normal satellites.
    It isn't that it can't be done -- it is that it is so bonkersly far away from what is possible.   I know that it is an amusing story, but where is the role in the news media is at least nudging towards 'you know that they're mad, right?'
    [My mum would believe it, but she thinks the moon is a few miles up and made of cheese anyway]
  8. Upvote
    dgul got a reaction from Van Lady in £250K to rent a unit in a shopping centre   
    Can't someone somewhere please make local councils stop speculating with my cash and get back to old-fashioned service provision.
  9. Upvote
    dgul got a reaction from Van Lady in £250K to rent a unit in a shopping centre   
    Can't someone somewhere please make local councils stop speculating with my cash and get back to old-fashioned service provision.
  10. Upvote
    dgul got a reaction from Lipid in Great Guy's "sort your plastic shit out" thread   
    Why have we got all this hate for plastic all of a sudden?  It is great stuff.  Easy to make, light to transport around the place and when you've finished with it bury it in the ground and the carbon in it will remain locked up forever (rather than decompose into co2).  And the easy to make and light to transport bits are important -- I can't remember the details, but disposable plastic bags are better for the environment than paper bags and 'bags for life' (that are usually not used enough), as they're so light to transport from factory to shop (and that is the killer, not the production of the things).
    Today we've got some nonsense about removing the plastic wrapping for vinyl records.  The point of the vinyl is that it stops theft, but also stops people playing with the package contents in the shop, eventually leading to some product having to be disposed.  What is never mentioned is the cost of this disposal -- so the important number is how many plastic wrappers are equivalent (in environmental impact) to each product (vinyl record in this example).  I'd guess it would be many many thousands (from a pov of raw material costs (weight of record vs weight of packaging) and the additional environmental costs in making the product over just the raw material).  Then they go on about solving the problems of not having the sealed product with other things, like stickers -- and no mention of the environmental impact of the chosen solution.
    And, yet again, absolutely no mention of the role of cheap crappy items made of plastic -- they're the problem, not a tiny quantity of plastic used for production.
    Oh, but at least we're hearing loads (last week or so) about what should be treated as a huge fraud on the part of local authorities -- the travesty that is the exporting of our 'recycling' over the last decade or so.  Sadly, this is still reported in terms of packaging -- why don't they realise that packaging isn't the core of the problem, consumerism is.  
    As an aside, I read earlier in the week that over 90% of the plastic in the world's oceans comes from 10 of the world's rivers -- Yangtze; Indus; Yellow; Hai He; Ganges; Pearl; Amur; Mekong; Nile; Niger.  I doubt there is much we can do about it all in the UK.  Well, apart from send our waste plastic to the very places that has a problem with putting waste into the ocean.
  11. Upvote
    dgul got a reaction from Frank Hovis in New Moon on Monday   
    The news media is clearly filled with gullible idiots.  RT did this linky, but the So-Called BBC and others were the same, simply regurgitating the news release.  There's so much 'unbelievable' in this, and I don't mean 'wildly enthusiastic' but actually not believable.
    For a start, it would need to be at 23,000 miles up, not the '500 miles'.  Then it would need to be absolutely ginormously vast.  Then the angle of reflection would have to be held accurate to tiny fractions of a degree (not the 'close enough' of normal satellites.
    It isn't that it can't be done -- it is that it is so bonkersly far away from what is possible.   I know that it is an amusing story, but where is the role in the news media is at least nudging towards 'you know that they're mad, right?'
    [My mum would believe it, but she thinks the moon is a few miles up and made of cheese anyway]
  12. Upvote
    dgul got a reaction from Lipid in Great Guy's "sort your plastic shit out" thread   
    Why have we got all this hate for plastic all of a sudden?  It is great stuff.  Easy to make, light to transport around the place and when you've finished with it bury it in the ground and the carbon in it will remain locked up forever (rather than decompose into co2).  And the easy to make and light to transport bits are important -- I can't remember the details, but disposable plastic bags are better for the environment than paper bags and 'bags for life' (that are usually not used enough), as they're so light to transport from factory to shop (and that is the killer, not the production of the things).
    Today we've got some nonsense about removing the plastic wrapping for vinyl records.  The point of the vinyl is that it stops theft, but also stops people playing with the package contents in the shop, eventually leading to some product having to be disposed.  What is never mentioned is the cost of this disposal -- so the important number is how many plastic wrappers are equivalent (in environmental impact) to each product (vinyl record in this example).  I'd guess it would be many many thousands (from a pov of raw material costs (weight of record vs weight of packaging) and the additional environmental costs in making the product over just the raw material).  Then they go on about solving the problems of not having the sealed product with other things, like stickers -- and no mention of the environmental impact of the chosen solution.
    And, yet again, absolutely no mention of the role of cheap crappy items made of plastic -- they're the problem, not a tiny quantity of plastic used for production.
    Oh, but at least we're hearing loads (last week or so) about what should be treated as a huge fraud on the part of local authorities -- the travesty that is the exporting of our 'recycling' over the last decade or so.  Sadly, this is still reported in terms of packaging -- why don't they realise that packaging isn't the core of the problem, consumerism is.  
    As an aside, I read earlier in the week that over 90% of the plastic in the world's oceans comes from 10 of the world's rivers -- Yangtze; Indus; Yellow; Hai He; Ganges; Pearl; Amur; Mekong; Nile; Niger.  I doubt there is much we can do about it all in the UK.  Well, apart from send our waste plastic to the very places that has a problem with putting waste into the ocean.
  13. Upvote
    dgul got a reaction from Frank Hovis in New Moon on Monday   
    The news media is clearly filled with gullible idiots.  RT did this linky, but the So-Called BBC and others were the same, simply regurgitating the news release.  There's so much 'unbelievable' in this, and I don't mean 'wildly enthusiastic' but actually not believable.
    For a start, it would need to be at 23,000 miles up, not the '500 miles'.  Then it would need to be absolutely ginormously vast.  Then the angle of reflection would have to be held accurate to tiny fractions of a degree (not the 'close enough' of normal satellites.
    It isn't that it can't be done -- it is that it is so bonkersly far away from what is possible.   I know that it is an amusing story, but where is the role in the news media is at least nudging towards 'you know that they're mad, right?'
    [My mum would believe it, but she thinks the moon is a few miles up and made of cheese anyway]
  14. Upvote
    dgul got a reaction from Frank Hovis in New Moon on Monday   
    The news media is clearly filled with gullible idiots.  RT did this linky, but the So-Called BBC and others were the same, simply regurgitating the news release.  There's so much 'unbelievable' in this, and I don't mean 'wildly enthusiastic' but actually not believable.
    For a start, it would need to be at 23,000 miles up, not the '500 miles'.  Then it would need to be absolutely ginormously vast.  Then the angle of reflection would have to be held accurate to tiny fractions of a degree (not the 'close enough' of normal satellites.
    It isn't that it can't be done -- it is that it is so bonkersly far away from what is possible.   I know that it is an amusing story, but where is the role in the news media is at least nudging towards 'you know that they're mad, right?'
    [My mum would believe it, but she thinks the moon is a few miles up and made of cheese anyway]
  15. Upvote
    dgul got a reaction from onlyme in Heating   
    Ah, okay.  I'd presume the internal thermostat has borked.  Probably best off 'till fixed.
  16. Upvote
    dgul got a reaction from swiss_democracy_for_all in A glimpse of the youth of today   
    It's said that you can either love poetry or prose*, never both -- and I'm a prose lover so I'm happy to keep to the periphery of this debate.
    [* and it must be true because when I have to listen to this sort of thing -- whether CardiB or Eminiem -- all I hear is mindless gibberish, mixed with random snippets of profanity and aggression for stupid people** to think it is profound]
    [** Heaney?  He was just trying to get down with the kids.  This never works, but everyone thinks they can try -- I guess Nobel laureates aren't immune...]
  17. Upvote
    dgul got a reaction from DeepLurker in Huddersfield grooming: Twenty guilty of campaign of rape and abuse   
    Nothing on the So-Called BBC about them being Asian.  You sure?
    Anyway, it seems certain that they're 'men', which seems a bit sexist to me.
  18. Upvote
    dgul got a reaction from One percent in Not sure id want to live in this village.   
    But he's the reason for the cum lake.
  19. Upvote
    dgul got a reaction from M S E Refugee in Bonuses   
    I'm a big fan of capitalism -- so it's a shame we've got this strange planned economy that seems to delight in handing out cash from the poor to the favoured.
  20. Upvote
    dgul got a reaction from Long time lurking in Huddersfield grooming: Twenty guilty of campaign of rape and abuse   
    I'd have thought it was due to their love of sex with drugged up underage girls trumping any historical cultural problems.
  21. Upvote
    dgul reacted to azzuri82 in Credit deflation and the reflation cycle to come.   
    It's the 'halfway house' systems that scare me. I have similar functions in my own car, but it's been shown that with the 50/50 autonomous systems that the drivers themselves feel a false sense of security, it causes concentration loss and thus can cause (normally pretty serious) accidents at high speed.
    I'd rather the autonomous system either did everything, or nothing. I'm not sure our brains are adapted well to this sort of halfway house system - you either need to be in control or not.
  22. Upvote
    dgul reacted to spygirl in Huddersfield grooming: Twenty guilty of campaign of rape and abuse   
    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-6294939/Huddersfield-Asian-sex-gang-jailed-200-years.html
    So, bbc sent a helicopter over cliffs house on one allegation.
    Adam johnstone was hounded during his trial, for sticking his hand up a girls skirt, sho he met in a nightclub.
    Yet the trial of mass rapists has blanket secrecy.
    Why?
     
  23. Upvote
    dgul got a reaction from mooncat69 in Huddersfield grooming: Twenty guilty of campaign of rape and abuse   
    Ah, they've updated it.
    [I imagine that they were swayed by a tidal wave of public opinion]
    I do find it odd how old white guys have to be named, picture shown, etc, because that way they can encourage other victims to come forward.
    But in this case it was very important for people not to have those details.  
  24. Upvote
    dgul got a reaction from Bricks & Mortar in I'm Surprised Halloween hasn't been banned yet   
    Nah, the median Christian doesn't care.  Just the odd sect (Jehovah Witnesses* deplore it, for example).
    [* although their Christian status isn't agreed by, well, anyone else -- they do believe in Jesus, so I'll put them in the Christian pile, albeit the tiny Unitarian sub-pile]
  25. Upvote
    dgul got a reaction from One percent in Not sure id want to live in this village.   
    But he's the reason for the cum lake.