Lipid

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  1. That's not the proper version. The original version is perhaps too close to the truth for comfort in these easily offended times. Apparently, it's about not liking Germans in the context of the First World War. http://www.kiplingsociety.co.uk/poems_beginnings.htm The Beginnings It was not part of their blood, It came to them very late With long arrears to make good, When the English began to hate. They were not easily moved, They were icy-willing to wait Till every count should be proved, Ere the English began to hate. Their voices were even and low, Their eyes were level and straight. There was neither sign nor show, When the English began to hate. It was not preached to the crowd, It was not taught by the State. No man spoke it aloud, When the English began to hate. It was not suddenly bred, It will not swiftly abate, Through the chill years ahead, When Time shall count from the date That the English began to hate.
  2. Lipid

    Bye bye Treason May?

    "The deal we will secure with the EU has securing jobs and prosperity at its heart" A slave with food and shelter is still a slave.
  3. Build a wall out of corrugated cardboard boxes. They are an excellent insulator due to being able to trap lots of air, they are pretty robust and cheap to get hold of. You can assemble and dismantle the wall fairly quickly, and when folded up flat, the boxes don't take up too much room. You can also enjoy jumping through a wall of cardboard boxes to the theme af any 1980's TV action cop show and shouting "Freeze!" (Ironically...)
  4. This is why diversity quotas can be damaging not just for the very people they are intended to help, but also for other people like them. If I had to trust, for example, my freedom to a lawyer, or life to a surgeon, I would want the most skilled person I could get, regardless of background, age, gender, ethnicity etc. When allocated someone from a group where there is no diversity quota, I wouldn't care whom I got as they have all been treated and assessed equally on their skills alone. If I were to be allocated someone from a group where there is a diversity quota, I would want someone that has definitely not benefitted from the quota. Why? Because their acceptance criteria will be weighed more heavily with regards to their ability. When an diversity quota is in place, there will always be some doubt (however large or small) regarding the ability of someone who has benefitted from the diversity quota. Now, here come the unintended consequences! If your freedom, or life, were at stake, would you want to take the risk that a diversity quota (that you were unaware of) was in place? Therefore, you should ask for someone who absolutely cannot have benefitted from a diversity quota, regardless of the known existence of a diversity quota. Behold - the diversity quota has had a negative impact greater than the expected positive impact. Equality of opportunity is essential, but equality of outcome is insanity. I'm sure I've heard that somewhere...
  5. Lipid

    Cheap shite with no reasonably-priced alternative

    I've had one of these for a couple of years: https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B00TG7Q9VM/ I used it twice a week for about two years to re-inflate a tyre (then it''s replacement) with a very slow puncture, and it's been superb. It's not particularly cheap at 30 quid, but I can't fault it at all. It even comes with a zip up case to keep it nice and tidy. (It turned out that the reason no-one could find the puncture in the tyres is that it was the rim that was faulty. I didn't spot this when I had the tyres changed as I replaced both on the same axle and the rim got swapped over to the other side, so I thought I was just unlucky with getting very slow punctures. When the problem persisted after another tyre change, I replaced the rim and the problem went away. You live and learn...) Now, can anybody recommed a good portable workbench - like a Black and Decker Workmate from the 1980s and not the flimsy piece of shit Black and Decker Workmate from the 2010s that I have?
  6. Lipid

    Great Covers

    This one always reminds me of summer at university. A great original track, but an even better cover:
  7. Lipid

    Film music.

    He also did the soundtrack to John Carpenter's The Thing. Chilling stuff...
  8. Lipid

    RIP John McCain

  9. Lipid

    Ben Stokes - Not guilty

    Being a cricket fan, I've been following this trial closely. In my opinion, the So-Called BBC had the knives out for Stokes from the outset. Check out the So-Called BBC bias against him when compared with another source - both these articles were published regarding the summing up of the trial: https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-bristol-45169488 http://www.espncricinfo.com/ci/content/story/1155241.html the So-Called BBC article's headline is "Ben Stokes trial: Cricketer 'lied about self-defence'". It does not include any comments from the judge. The Cricinfo article headline is "Jury set to consider verdict as Ben Stokes awaits fate", and includes these comments from the judge: "The judge also suggested that Stokes' account had been "very consistent" from the first time he was interviewed by the police, on September 25, to his appearance in the witness box." "The judge also said that the recollection of Andrew Cunningham, the doorman at Mbargo nightclub who suggested Stokes was abusive and had bullied two gay men, was not entirely consistent." The only reason I still pay my BBC tax is so I can watch the cricket. I don't begrudge Sky for the money I pay for the cricket coverage as it is pretty good, but I'm pissed off having to pay the So-Called BBC just for the right to be able to pay Sky to watch the cricket.
  10. Lipid

    Hard Work Books That Were Worth It

    Something a bit more modern: "Dear Boy: The Life of Keith Moon" by Tony Fletcher. It took quite a while to get going (about 150 - 200 pages I think), but once Moon's adventures are in full flow, I raced through it. The last two-thirds were both hilarious and sad at the same time.
  11. I've always wanted to sit one of these tests so I can copy what astronaut Pete Conrad did: https://www.spaceanswers.com/space-exploration/heroes-of-space-pete-conrad/ From the above link: "On being shown a blank card by psychologists, he stared briefly before telling them: “It’s upside down.” He also presented his stool sample in a red-ribboned gift box and described a sexual account in the greatest of detail when presented with an Rorschach inkblot test."
  12. I was getting more and more wound up as I read more and more of that article, as it appeared to be presenting them as helpless victims, when the reality is that their problems are all of their own making, but if you read to the end, it says this further down: Note the phrase "final decision". That was the end of thier "mis-selling" hopes. At some point, the bank will pull the plug and repossess *its* house. I reckon that this article isn't designed to get people to sympathise with these "victims", rather that it is a warning for others in a similar situation that they need to take responsibility for their actions and sort out their finances before it is too late. However, I think it would have been better if this article was less subtle - if the other people in this situation didn't fully appreciate the contracts they signed, they probably won't read this article properly.
  13. Lipid

    The end of Dr Who?

    Ah, what could have been...
  14. Lipid

    Quiet hour

    Dimming the lights, turing off music, turning off escalators, no loudspeaker announcements - to me this sounds like a trial run in introducing some cost saving measures and they're using the autistic cause as cover. If any of these changes result in few or no complaints, I would expect those changes to be rolled out nationwide and for most (if not all) opening hours. Perhaps I'm autistic as the thought of all of those measures appeal to me.
  15. Lipid

    Anyone with pharma knowledge on here?

    The real question is: Why is your wife anxious? If she thinks she is not good enough at driving to pass her test (and she isn't), then she shouldn't be taking her test. Cancel the test and have her take some more lessons until the standard of her driving improves enough for her to pass. If it's fear of failure, remind her that there's not really much of a penalty for failing - yes, it costs time and money to take the test, and maybe she might feel a little embarassment about failing it, but so what? You can take the test as may times as you need. Explain this to her, and get her to relax about it. If she incorrectly thinks she is not good enough at driving to pass, then it's a confidence problem, so something needs to be done to improve her confidence. (This was my problem. I didn't learn to drive until my late 20s.) Here are some things my driving instructor told me to help with my nerves: 1 - You can drive well enough to pass your driving test - I wouldn't have told you to book your driving test if I thought your driving wasn't good enough. 2 - If you make a mistake during your driving test, do not panic or assume you have failed - unless you have done something dangerous, you can recover from it. 3 - If you make a mistake during a manoeuvre, ask to attempt it again. 4 - All you have to do in order to pass the test is to be able to control the car, and to be able to drive safely in traffic. That's it. When I took my test, I made a mess of reverse parking and the car was way too far from the kerb. I asked the instructor if I could try it again, and they told me I could. I got it right the second time, and ended up passing my test. If she's going to take anything to ease her anxiety, it should be taken the night before to help her sleep, and the test should be taken in the morning, just after the rush hour traffic has abated. The reasons for this are: She doesn't have all day to get worked up about it, but doesn't have to contend with rush hour traffic. As Brian Clough said: "Preparation is relaxation." Once she's passed her test, you can then tell her what all experienced drivers know: It's only once you've passed your test that you really learn to drive.