Frank Hovis

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  1. Agree
    Frank Hovis reacted to Austin Allegro in BBC Sport Pages SJW Politicisation   
    Somebody posted on here I think a clip of Question Time when a man in the audience said that the UK was one of the least racist countries in the world. Some professional black offence-taker on the panel had an attack of the vapours and a bespectacled Muslim bluestocking woman in a headscarf heckled something like 'what does a white man know about racism?'
    Really this isn't much different from the tricks the Witchfinders General used back in the seventeenth century. 'How can you be sure she is not a witch? Perhaps you are one yourself?'
  2. Agree
    Frank Hovis reacted to Chewing Grass in Catalonia and the Catalan Rebellion   
    Update on democracy and freedom in Europe (Spain).
    Spanish judiciary to prosecute two political science scholars and two law scholars based at three different universities in Barcelona. The four academics, (Jordi Matas, Tània Verge, Marc Marsal and Josep Pagès) along with a lawyer (Marta Alsina) were appointed members of the electoral commission in September 2017 by the parliament of Catalonia to monitor the 1 October 2017 referendum.
    Even though the Spanish constitutional court forced them to resign through fines of €12,000 per person for each day that they remained in their position, the Spanish judiciary has charged the electoral monitors with the offences of “disobedience” and “usurpation of functions” and they are facing the very real possibility of up to two years and nine months in prison.
    This is how the EU will roll, eventually.
    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/dec/07/grave-concern-for-electoral-monitors-facing-jail-in-spain
  3. Agree
    Frank Hovis got a reaction from Great Guy in Reality is another country   
    I haven't had kids but I think it is the greatest triumph of the Soros mob that its insidious propaganda has prevented decent people like yourself from having children.
    The world needs more decent people; not less.
  4. Agree
    Frank Hovis got a reaction from Great Guy in Reality is another country   
    I haven't had kids but I think it is the greatest triumph of the Soros mob that its insidious propaganda has prevented decent people like yourself from having children.
    The world needs more decent people; not less.
  5. Agree
    Frank Hovis got a reaction from Byron in Reality is another country   
    Maybe even ten years ago I woudl have disagreed with you; I don't now.
    That Macron "but it's for the planet" excuse as he squeezed the last few francs out of poor working people rang incredibly hollow.
  6. Agree
    Frank Hovis got a reaction from Great Guy in Reality is another country   
    I haven't had kids but I think it is the greatest triumph of the Soros mob that its insidious propaganda has prevented decent people like yourself from having children.
    The world needs more decent people; not less.
  7. Agree
    Frank Hovis got a reaction from Popuplights in Minimum wage to tackle poverty   
    I work in a big organisation that has adopted living wage, sort of take minimum wage and add the number you first thought of.
    Wage increases across the board have been minimal to non-existent for coming up to ten years but the NMW / LW has been forging ahead and all the differentials have been squeezed.
    The jobs are still the same, the higher you go the more stressful is the work and the more hours you have to do, but the differentials generally aren't there any more.  There remains a big jump from junior / starting level to a middle post and also between the executive and the rest but that's it.
    For the majority ?60 / 70% the differentials are no longer sufficient to justify the additional work that a promotion brings so people aren't taking them or applying for internal vacancies and in one case applied for and got a more junior job as the pay cut was worth the big drop in pressure.
    There have also been several cases of hours' reduction which again are all about taking a step down.
    As a result productivity suffers because rather than working hard for a promotion people are instead looking to ease off: less hours, demotion, or early retirement.  Nobody wishes to advance because it's not worth it.
    This is all internal but then you bring in external factors such as house prices - will getting paid £10k more make a real difference to the house you buy? Generally not as it's a drop in the ocean.
    This is going to continue and any step changes to NMW / LW will crush that last remaining differential within staff - from starter to senior - and see everyone opting for the easy routine jobs for the easy life.
    Companies are going to become like zombies plodding along with nobody wishing to step up because it won't be worth so doing.
     
    Edit: A clear symptom of this lack of benefit from advancement is that in the last five years the number of people studying for professional qualifications where I work has fallen off a cliff.  These are very hard work but do give you significant career advancement.
    I think this may be reflected nationally as I have read of one public sector professional body being in severe financial difficulty since if the numbers studying and joining have fallen off a cliff then so has their income.
  8. Agree
    Frank Hovis got a reaction from Popuplights in Minimum wage to tackle poverty   
    I work in a big organisation that has adopted living wage, sort of take minimum wage and add the number you first thought of.
    Wage increases across the board have been minimal to non-existent for coming up to ten years but the NMW / LW has been forging ahead and all the differentials have been squeezed.
    The jobs are still the same, the higher you go the more stressful is the work and the more hours you have to do, but the differentials generally aren't there any more.  There remains a big jump from junior / starting level to a middle post and also between the executive and the rest but that's it.
    For the majority ?60 / 70% the differentials are no longer sufficient to justify the additional work that a promotion brings so people aren't taking them or applying for internal vacancies and in one case applied for and got a more junior job as the pay cut was worth the big drop in pressure.
    There have also been several cases of hours' reduction which again are all about taking a step down.
    As a result productivity suffers because rather than working hard for a promotion people are instead looking to ease off: less hours, demotion, or early retirement.  Nobody wishes to advance because it's not worth it.
    This is all internal but then you bring in external factors such as house prices - will getting paid £10k more make a real difference to the house you buy? Generally not as it's a drop in the ocean.
    This is going to continue and any step changes to NMW / LW will crush that last remaining differential within staff - from starter to senior - and see everyone opting for the easy routine jobs for the easy life.
    Companies are going to become like zombies plodding along with nobody wishing to step up because it won't be worth so doing.
     
    Edit: A clear symptom of this lack of benefit from advancement is that in the last five years the number of people studying for professional qualifications where I work has fallen off a cliff.  These are very hard work but do give you significant career advancement.
    I think this may be reflected nationally as I have read of one public sector professional body being in severe financial difficulty since if the numbers studying and joining have fallen off a cliff then so has their income.
  9. Agree
    Frank Hovis got a reaction from Popuplights in Minimum wage to tackle poverty   
    I work in a big organisation that has adopted living wage, sort of take minimum wage and add the number you first thought of.
    Wage increases across the board have been minimal to non-existent for coming up to ten years but the NMW / LW has been forging ahead and all the differentials have been squeezed.
    The jobs are still the same, the higher you go the more stressful is the work and the more hours you have to do, but the differentials generally aren't there any more.  There remains a big jump from junior / starting level to a middle post and also between the executive and the rest but that's it.
    For the majority ?60 / 70% the differentials are no longer sufficient to justify the additional work that a promotion brings so people aren't taking them or applying for internal vacancies and in one case applied for and got a more junior job as the pay cut was worth the big drop in pressure.
    There have also been several cases of hours' reduction which again are all about taking a step down.
    As a result productivity suffers because rather than working hard for a promotion people are instead looking to ease off: less hours, demotion, or early retirement.  Nobody wishes to advance because it's not worth it.
    This is all internal but then you bring in external factors such as house prices - will getting paid £10k more make a real difference to the house you buy? Generally not as it's a drop in the ocean.
    This is going to continue and any step changes to NMW / LW will crush that last remaining differential within staff - from starter to senior - and see everyone opting for the easy routine jobs for the easy life.
    Companies are going to become like zombies plodding along with nobody wishing to step up because it won't be worth so doing.
     
    Edit: A clear symptom of this lack of benefit from advancement is that in the last five years the number of people studying for professional qualifications where I work has fallen off a cliff.  These are very hard work but do give you significant career advancement.
    I think this may be reflected nationally as I have read of one public sector professional body being in severe financial difficulty since if the numbers studying and joining have fallen off a cliff then so has their income.
  10. Agree
    Frank Hovis got a reaction from Popuplights in Minimum wage to tackle poverty   
    I work in a big organisation that has adopted living wage, sort of take minimum wage and add the number you first thought of.
    Wage increases across the board have been minimal to non-existent for coming up to ten years but the NMW / LW has been forging ahead and all the differentials have been squeezed.
    The jobs are still the same, the higher you go the more stressful is the work and the more hours you have to do, but the differentials generally aren't there any more.  There remains a big jump from junior / starting level to a middle post and also between the executive and the rest but that's it.
    For the majority ?60 / 70% the differentials are no longer sufficient to justify the additional work that a promotion brings so people aren't taking them or applying for internal vacancies and in one case applied for and got a more junior job as the pay cut was worth the big drop in pressure.
    There have also been several cases of hours' reduction which again are all about taking a step down.
    As a result productivity suffers because rather than working hard for a promotion people are instead looking to ease off: less hours, demotion, or early retirement.  Nobody wishes to advance because it's not worth it.
    This is all internal but then you bring in external factors such as house prices - will getting paid £10k more make a real difference to the house you buy? Generally not as it's a drop in the ocean.
    This is going to continue and any step changes to NMW / LW will crush that last remaining differential within staff - from starter to senior - and see everyone opting for the easy routine jobs for the easy life.
    Companies are going to become like zombies plodding along with nobody wishing to step up because it won't be worth so doing.
     
    Edit: A clear symptom of this lack of benefit from advancement is that in the last five years the number of people studying for professional qualifications where I work has fallen off a cliff.  These are very hard work but do give you significant career advancement.
    I think this may be reflected nationally as I have read of one public sector professional body being in severe financial difficulty since if the numbers studying and joining have fallen off a cliff then so has their income.
  11. Agree
    Frank Hovis got a reaction from Popuplights in Minimum wage to tackle poverty   
    I work in a big organisation that has adopted living wage, sort of take minimum wage and add the number you first thought of.
    Wage increases across the board have been minimal to non-existent for coming up to ten years but the NMW / LW has been forging ahead and all the differentials have been squeezed.
    The jobs are still the same, the higher you go the more stressful is the work and the more hours you have to do, but the differentials generally aren't there any more.  There remains a big jump from junior / starting level to a middle post and also between the executive and the rest but that's it.
    For the majority ?60 / 70% the differentials are no longer sufficient to justify the additional work that a promotion brings so people aren't taking them or applying for internal vacancies and in one case applied for and got a more junior job as the pay cut was worth the big drop in pressure.
    There have also been several cases of hours' reduction which again are all about taking a step down.
    As a result productivity suffers because rather than working hard for a promotion people are instead looking to ease off: less hours, demotion, or early retirement.  Nobody wishes to advance because it's not worth it.
    This is all internal but then you bring in external factors such as house prices - will getting paid £10k more make a real difference to the house you buy? Generally not as it's a drop in the ocean.
    This is going to continue and any step changes to NMW / LW will crush that last remaining differential within staff - from starter to senior - and see everyone opting for the easy routine jobs for the easy life.
    Companies are going to become like zombies plodding along with nobody wishing to step up because it won't be worth so doing.
     
    Edit: A clear symptom of this lack of benefit from advancement is that in the last five years the number of people studying for professional qualifications where I work has fallen off a cliff.  These are very hard work but do give you significant career advancement.
    I think this may be reflected nationally as I have read of one public sector professional body being in severe financial difficulty since if the numbers studying and joining have fallen off a cliff then so has their income.
  12. Agree
    Frank Hovis got a reaction from Popuplights in Minimum wage to tackle poverty   
    I work in a big organisation that has adopted living wage, sort of take minimum wage and add the number you first thought of.
    Wage increases across the board have been minimal to non-existent for coming up to ten years but the NMW / LW has been forging ahead and all the differentials have been squeezed.
    The jobs are still the same, the higher you go the more stressful is the work and the more hours you have to do, but the differentials generally aren't there any more.  There remains a big jump from junior / starting level to a middle post and also between the executive and the rest but that's it.
    For the majority ?60 / 70% the differentials are no longer sufficient to justify the additional work that a promotion brings so people aren't taking them or applying for internal vacancies and in one case applied for and got a more junior job as the pay cut was worth the big drop in pressure.
    There have also been several cases of hours' reduction which again are all about taking a step down.
    As a result productivity suffers because rather than working hard for a promotion people are instead looking to ease off: less hours, demotion, or early retirement.  Nobody wishes to advance because it's not worth it.
    This is all internal but then you bring in external factors such as house prices - will getting paid £10k more make a real difference to the house you buy? Generally not as it's a drop in the ocean.
    This is going to continue and any step changes to NMW / LW will crush that last remaining differential within staff - from starter to senior - and see everyone opting for the easy routine jobs for the easy life.
    Companies are going to become like zombies plodding along with nobody wishing to step up because it won't be worth so doing.
     
    Edit: A clear symptom of this lack of benefit from advancement is that in the last five years the number of people studying for professional qualifications where I work has fallen off a cliff.  These are very hard work but do give you significant career advancement.
    I think this may be reflected nationally as I have read of one public sector professional body being in severe financial difficulty since if the numbers studying and joining have fallen off a cliff then so has their income.
  13. Agree
    Frank Hovis reacted to dgul in Minimum wage to tackle poverty   
    I suppose minimum wage would make sense if everyone gets a bit of a bump up.  But obviously they can't, so you just end up with people with no skills earning almost as much as those with actual skills, which then diminishes the value of skills.  Why would that be considered a good thing?
  14. Agree
    Frank Hovis reacted to eight in Minimum wage to tackle poverty   
    Without trying to use actual figures, the minimum reward for working full time needs to be about twice what it is now, in relation to everything else.
  15. Agree
    Frank Hovis reacted to billfunk in Minimum wage to tackle poverty   
    Everyone was better off when there wasn't a NMW. The key is to control the cost of living rather than dictate the price of labour, which just ruins productivity as you allude to. Abolish NMW and implement a LVT to keep housing costs down.
    Just to expand on that. The current attitude toward property is that it is a one way bet and the safest route to wealth. The current attitude towards career development is that it is fairly pointless because increments have become compressed and the state robs at least a third of it anyway. The correct attitude toward property is that it is necessary to live in but financially a liability. The correct attitude towards career development is that it is the quickest and best route to wealth. We need to make people adopt these correct attitudes and shed the old malignant ones.
     
  16. Agree
    Frank Hovis reacted to crashmonitor in Reality is another country   
    Reminds me of this American  Civil war veteran of 1862 who remarried late in life and his 86 year old daughter was still drawing a Civil war pension 151 years after the war finished in 2017. Why the offspring get the pension God knows.
    https://www.usnews.com/news/articles/2016-08-08/civil-war-vets-pension-still-remains-on-governments-payroll-151-years-after-last-shot-fired
  17. Agree
    Frank Hovis got a reaction from Byron in Reality is another country   
    Maybe even ten years ago I woudl have disagreed with you; I don't now.
    That Macron "but it's for the planet" excuse as he squeezed the last few francs out of poor working people rang incredibly hollow.
  18. Agree
    Frank Hovis got a reaction from mattydread in Brexit Betrayal thread   
    We the people of the United Kingdom.
  19. Agree
    Frank Hovis got a reaction from spunko in Christmas Tree Thread   
    Well it's up, but it's not very exciting.
    The last time I did the one at work it was described as looking like a lorry had crashed into it.
  20. Agree
    Frank Hovis got a reaction from UmBongo in When did you last use a fax machine?   
    I remember their being incredibly cool and cutting edge in the late 80s along with Filofaxes and stripy clothing from Next.
    That was rather a long time ago though.
  21. Agree
    Frank Hovis got a reaction from null; in This is so, so, sad. Heartbreakingly sad   
    New Zealand would be pretty high on most people's safest countries list; it's great shame and the reaction in New Zealand shows how unusual this is.
    I'm not reading anything into the name not being released; odds on that it's a local nutcase.
  22. Agree
    Frank Hovis reacted to BadAlchemy in Brexit Betrayal thread   
    What a great day. Great crowd. I was having second thoughts about going because of antifa lot but realized that is exactly their intention to frighten people away so.. fuck it.. it made me more determined to go.
    I saw the gallows and the liberty bell and that woman on the tricycle with union jack face. Even had a man in an inflatable T Rex outfit join the procession next to me. 
    First time I have been on any sort of march. Very encouraging to see so many normal people that can clearly see through all the bullshit being fed to them. Just a shame there aren't more of us. Give it time and I feel more will come on board especially if the betrayal continues. Lets see what happens this week coming...
  23. Agree
    Frank Hovis got a reaction from onlyme in Brexit Betrayal thread   
    Huge applause to those who went on the march!
    And I like to think that somebody from here was responsible for this placard.

    Lots of pictures on here, see if you can find yourself.
    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-6476427/Thousands-join-EDL-founder-Tommy-Robinson-Brexit-Betrayal-march.html
  24. Agree
    Frank Hovis got a reaction from maudit in Reality is another country   
    And lots of other people.
    I have said it before but when we do hit the buffers it is going to be horrendous and all of these measures to allow populations to keep growing are going to make the ultimate crash that much worse.
    Burn the fossil fuels, get it over with, and then when they are all gone the population will revert to that the planet can renewably support and it ain't going to be pretty getting to that point.  And the bigger the population when we hit that the worse it will be.
    I don't even see this as being some dim and distant future; I think the first shockwaves will come in 2030 when it becomes impossible to continue to hide that Saudi oil is rapidly running out and energy prices rocket as a consequence.  For anyone who thinks that it doesn't matter because of wind and solar I don't see how those are going to fuel combine harvesters, tractors in remote areas, or make fertiliser so food prices will also rocket.
    I think it's both unavoidable and imminent and that dicking about with carbon taxes or getting excited about electric cars will do nothing bar make people poorer whilst causing only minor postponement of the energy price boom.
  25. Agree
    Frank Hovis reacted to One percent in Brexit Betrayal thread   
    Just been looking at newspaper reports of the brexit march today. There is talk of fears of violence, riot police prepared etc.  I was worried about attending, thinking I might be kettled for hours or worse, attacked and maimed or killed. 
    To set the record straight, it was like a leisurely walk round Westminster. The marchers were ordinary folk. Mixed but (worryingly) the demographic was slanted age wise upwards. There were disabled people. One person in a wheelchair got stuck on a pavement and people rushed to help. 
    Complete strangers would engage you in conversation.  They would apologise if they accidentally bumped into you. 
    There were forigners in the March, a couple of elderly Greek chaps spring to mind.  How sad is that, that foreigners are prepared more than British people to defend out democracy. A big thank you to all of them. 
    All in all, a very worthwhile event and a good way to pass a few hours.