Jump to content
DOSBODS

Frank Hovis

Members
  • Content Count

    22,884
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    202

Reputation Activity

  1. Agree
    Frank Hovis got a reaction from Mirror Mirror in Boris, Starmer, Lib Dems or naughty troublemaker Farage?   
    Farage.
    He is genuinely a man of the people rather than establishment stooges like the others listed IMO.
    He has tremendous popular support and if he would put his efforts into forming a genuinely populist party with a full range of policies then he would have the keys to number ten in a few short years.
    Maybe though he doesn't want that but is happy making his videos instead.
    And if that makes him happy then good luck to him as he devoted most of his life to achieving BREXIT and so already has his place in history.
  2. Agree
    Frank Hovis got a reaction from Melchett in 2015 Thalys terrorist attack   
    A defence has to be put because of the possibility that it might be correct and the police wrong; which obviously can happen.
    In this case it can be readily dismissed.
  3. Agree
    Frank Hovis reacted to Andersen in Lumpy mattress time? Who is stashing their cash?   
    For anyone who avoids digital payments (older generations who don't have online access, can't remember pin numbers on cards, and have only ever used cash from being a child), having a reserve of cash in the house is normal. How much is kept like this? A local report had an old boy bringing a tin with his life savings of >£20k out of a burning house - it was confiscated as possible proceeds of crime (until he could prove otherwise)!  Folk with loss of memory / senility / alzheimers often forget they have some already so hide another stash - and another...
    Building societies still offer passbook accounts for folk who prefer to see their savings printed in a booklet rather than digital.
    Also the "free living" types (several on here) who pay cash just to delay the move to a cashless society (and all the oversight that brings with it).
    As above, if you've paid your mortgage/living rent free, council tax exempt, don't drink/smoke, and don't go on expensive holidays, a few grand will last you a long time.
  4. Agree
    Frank Hovis got a reaction from honkydonkey in 2015 Thalys terrorist attack   
    A defence has to be put because of the possibility that it might be correct and the police wrong; which obviously can happen.
    In this case it can be readily dismissed.
  5. Agree
    Frank Hovis reacted to haroldshand in Boris, Starmer, Lib Dems or naughty troublemaker Farage?   
    I totally believe that Farage loves old England and genuinely loves our culture and traditions and does not advocate that "times change and we MUST move on", and not to do so makes you and old gammon racist living in the past.
    If something works why change it?
    He is probably going to fail at the end of the day, but at least his intentions are sincere and I honestly believe he loves the English Bloke/geezer, fishing with his mates for a cod in choppy waters and having a banter and a mug of tea, a fag and a pint and talking to some old Granny with strong opinions on holding onto traditions, Morris dancers, WW2 Vets etc etc
    I am sick to death of these Guardian reading woke liberals that probably preach constantly about saving various rain forest cultures and tribes around the world but want to destroy our own British one with glee.
  6. Informative
    Frank Hovis reacted to wherebee in Lumpy mattress time? Who is stashing their cash?   
    No.  I frequently have more than that in cash, for various reasons, including this year the pandemic where initial reports suggested that it was going to be much worse than it was, and in a supply chain collapse cash becomes king.  I also carry a lot of cash when moving around overseas, rather than rely upon an ATM being available at the right time.
    The idea that only criminals need cash has been drummed into you by years of propaganda.  The original focus in the USA on criminal cash was 10k.  That was back in the 60's.  That's about 50k now, I think, in terms of purchasing power.  THATS where criminality becomes probable.
  7. Agree
    Frank Hovis got a reaction from VeryMeanReversion in Boris, Starmer, Lib Dems or naughty troublemaker Farage?   
    Farage.
    He is genuinely a man of the people rather than establishment stooges like the others listed IMO.
    He has tremendous popular support and if he would put his efforts into forming a genuinely populist party with a full range of policies then he would have the keys to number ten in a few short years.
    Maybe though he doesn't want that but is happy making his videos instead.
    And if that makes him happy then good luck to him as he devoted most of his life to achieving BREXIT and so already has his place in history.
  8. Agree
    Frank Hovis got a reaction from gilf in 2015 Thalys terrorist attack   
    A defence has to be put because of the possibility that it might be correct and the police wrong; which obviously can happen.
    In this case it can be readily dismissed.
  9. Agree
    Frank Hovis got a reaction from Conniption in Boris, Starmer, Lib Dems or naughty troublemaker Farage?   
    Farage.
    He is genuinely a man of the people rather than establishment stooges like the others listed IMO.
    He has tremendous popular support and if he would put his efforts into forming a genuinely populist party with a full range of policies then he would have the keys to number ten in a few short years.
    Maybe though he doesn't want that but is happy making his videos instead.
    And if that makes him happy then good luck to him as he devoted most of his life to achieving BREXIT and so already has his place in history.
  10. Agree
    Frank Hovis reacted to GBDamo in The Presidential Election, Trump-Biden   
    It is becoming more apparent that the left know they cheated bigly at all levels and, in their mind, that cheating is just because their cause is just.
    They are not going quietly.
  11. Agree
    Frank Hovis reacted to ad_ceng in Boris, Starmer, Lib Dems or naughty troublemaker Farage?   
    Honestly it all needs to go, smaller state, fewer laws and hardly any CS/PS. Make education, NHS etch paid for at point of use abolish all local councils. 
    Zero taxes on income, consumption, capital or profit. 
    Police to be unpaid specials
    Defence to be tiny enough to protect borders stop invading and killing people for profit. 
    We have tried the state it is corrupt and evil and destructive, just like religion time to try something different
    The issue is the transition while all the non productive and those who make a living from the state have to adjust
  12. Agree
    Frank Hovis reacted to swiss_democracy_for_all in Boris, Starmer, Lib Dems or naughty troublemaker Farage?   
    Exactly.
    No party is proposing replacing the (currently non-existent but theoretical) constitution and electoral system, which is what is required.
  13. Agree
    Frank Hovis got a reaction from Byron in Boris, Starmer, Lib Dems or naughty troublemaker Farage?   
    Farage.
    He is genuinely a man of the people rather than establishment stooges like the others listed IMO.
    He has tremendous popular support and if he would put his efforts into forming a genuinely populist party with a full range of policies then he would have the keys to number ten in a few short years.
    Maybe though he doesn't want that but is happy making his videos instead.
    And if that makes him happy then good luck to him as he devoted most of his life to achieving BREXIT and so already has his place in history.
  14. Agree
    Frank Hovis got a reaction from JoeDavola in Lumpy mattress time? Who is stashing their cash?   
    If you ignore children then you are looking at about £1,000 per head which is a lot. I deal near-exclusively in cash and typically have £200.  The most I've had, barring special circumstances like buying holiday cash, is about £500.
    I also know people who have embraced every new bit of cashless tech and they tend to only hold about £20.
    Obviously places like shops, banks and supermarkets will hold lots which will balance that out.
    It comes back to being £1,000 per head.
    My first thought is that there is one type of person that routinely holds far more than £1,000 in cash and that is a drug dealer because they are forced to do so as laundering is a slow process.
    And that there is a vast amount more money being spent on illegal drugs than the government wishes to admit.
  15. Informative
    Frank Hovis got a reaction from deathfunk in Lumpy mattress time? Who is stashing their cash?   
    She was treating the benefits as a UBI and positioning herself accordingly.
    Whereas the benefits are really there for spending to keep the money circulating.
    All that she needed to do was to keep her savings off radar by holding them physically (cash, gold) and tell nobody about them and then she could have continued indefinitely.
    In theory this could be a lifestyle choice which equates to UBI but you would have to be in a position where you were unable to work, some disability, or you would be made to work or lose benefits.
    Meaning that really this unilateral declaration of UBI is only an option for the disabled.
  16. Informative
    Frank Hovis got a reaction from Melchett in Lumpy mattress time? Who is stashing their cash?   
    If you ignore children then you are looking at about £1,000 per head which is a lot. I deal near-exclusively in cash and typically have £200.  The most I've had, barring special circumstances like buying holiday cash, is about £500.
    I also know people who have embraced every new bit of cashless tech and they tend to only hold about £20.
    Obviously places like shops, banks and supermarkets will hold lots which will balance that out.
    It comes back to being £1,000 per head.
    My first thought is that there is one type of person that routinely holds far more than £1,000 in cash and that is a drug dealer because they are forced to do so as laundering is a slow process.
    And that there is a vast amount more money being spent on illegal drugs than the government wishes to admit.
  17. Agree
    Frank Hovis reacted to sleepwello'nights in Lumpy mattress time? Who is stashing their cash?   
    Her problem was she was honest.
    Admittedly she should have worked out how the system was intended to "work" and arranged her situation accordingly.
    Another case of taking frugality too far. She could have spent some on living more comfortably, heating, clothing, alcohol maybe, presents for relatives. 
    The desire to be frugal is too strong in some.
  18. Agree
    Frank Hovis got a reaction from Melchett in Lumpy mattress time? Who is stashing their cash?   
    That's however at 1%. 
    As I noted my mother's Post Office account pays 0.1%, £1 for every £1,000 deposited, or the princely sum of £20 on £20,000.
    It's not an investment account, fortunately, it's a holiday fund that is spent each year but that rate is simply rude.
  19. Agree
    Frank Hovis got a reaction from Melchett in Lumpy mattress time? Who is stashing their cash?   
    She was treating the benefits as a UBI and positioning herself accordingly.
    Whereas the benefits are really there for spending to keep the money circulating.
    All that she needed to do was to keep her savings off radar by holding them physically (cash, gold) and tell nobody about them and then she could have continued indefinitely.
    In theory this could be a lifestyle choice which equates to UBI but you would have to be in a position where you were unable to work, some disability, or you would be made to work or lose benefits.
    Meaning that really this unilateral declaration of UBI is only an option for the disabled.
  20. Agree
    Frank Hovis reacted to Melchett in Lumpy mattress time? Who is stashing their cash?   
    In my youth I travelled and worked extensively in Africa. Even streetvendors preferred to be paid in dollars, French francs or sterling than the local toilet paper. Most didnt even blink an eye, they did an instant exchange rate for you on their pocket calculators. Though of course they always preferred to give change in the local currency.
  21. Agree
    Frank Hovis got a reaction from Melchett in Lumpy mattress time? Who is stashing their cash?   
    To expand on @desertorchid's point it is also that physical cash is invisible to the authorities so if you have something like £10k which would prevent your receiving benefits or having your care home fees paid then it is wiser to keep it off the authorities' radar as then you will be able to keep it as well as receive benefits.
  22. Agree
    Frank Hovis got a reaction from mh9000 in Has Coronavirus officially killed the housing market?   
    What I don't understand is why so many people who only own one house think that the price of it going up by 6.5% is a good thing.
    If it was gold or shares then you can sell some and realise the profits - buy a car, go on holiday - yes that's good news.
    You can't however sell some of your house (yes ok equity release but 'tis a very poor deal) and any house you may wish to buy when you sell your current house will also have gone up 6.5%.
    Once you have bought a house that's it; you own it.  Most people wouldn't consider STR (I wouldn't) so the only "benefit" of a rise is that you can say that you bought at the right / a better time.  Or rather that somebody on the salary you were then would not be able to afford it now.
    And why is that a good thing?
    There is a real lack of critical thinking here.  If you have children then house prices going up means that they can't buy therefore a bad thing.
    If you don't have children then you're living in the house until you pop off at which point you're not going to care what it is then worth.
    I accept on one level that I can say I bought a house for £XXXk and it is now worth 125% £XXXk so aren't I clever but as I can't take any benefit from that 25% rise then what good has it actually done me?
    I'm 25% £XXXk richer but I can't get at it to spend it.  In that case in what sense am I richer?
    You can't sell a house as you could a classic car, fancy watch, or antique because you are living in it.
    It's only ever paper wealth: you personally will never see that money.
    Its like having a notional valuation on your feet.  "My feet were worth £200k ten years ago but now they're worth a cool million!".
    Unless you intend to chop off your feet and sell them then the value is irrelelvant.
  23. Agree
    Frank Hovis reacted to sleepwello'nights in Lumpy mattress time? Who is stashing their cash?   
    There was an article a few years ago about a lady who lived in a caravan in deepest Cornwall.
    She lived very frugally on state benefits. She managed on the income from the state and managed to save some. Somehow the authorities found the amount she had saved disqualified her from benefits. They prosecuted her for benefit fraud.
     
  24. Agree
    Frank Hovis reacted to wherebee in Lumpy mattress time? Who is stashing their cash?   
    LOL.  It's been known for a long time that currencies quite like being the storage notes of choice for organised crime.  The US dollar is stacked billions high by bad people all over the world.  A percentage will never resurface - great for the currency issuer!

    The EU issued a 500euro note in 2002 despite warnings that it would immediately be used for money laundering.  Why?  Because it helped kickstart demand for the euro.  They rolled it back in 2014.  
  25. Agree
    Frank Hovis reacted to Lightly Toasted in Could Scotland end the low interest rates?   
    I don't recall the Unionists making a big deal about that last time. The question "in what currency will independent Scotland pay its public sector salaries and pensions?" (as opposed to simply what currency would be used for transactions) would have concentrated minds. Of course the Nats will answer "it's our pound too!" and say they'll continue to make sterling payments, the question will be whether people believe them.
×
×
  • Create New...