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Pet Insurance


M S E Refugee

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M S E Refugee

We have just bought an 8 week old puppy and we are thinking about Pet Insurance,is it worth it or should I just save £20 a week towards any Vet bills.

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Depends. We have a 15 year old lab who has had the constitution of an ox. Complete waste of money. OTOH, a friend had a red setter with health issues and it was never away from the vet. 

If I was to do it again, I would insure it for the first year or two and see how it was health wise. If fine, put the premium in a separate account to pay any future vet bills 

Oh, and what have you got? 

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M S E Refugee
23 minutes ago, One percent said:

Depends. We have a 15 year old lab who has had the constitution of an ox. Complete waste of money. OTOH, a friend had a red setter with health issues and it was never away from the vet. 

If I was to do it again, I would insure it for the first year or two and see how it was health wise. If fine, put the premium in a separate account to pay any future vet bills 

Oh, and what have you got? 

An Ogar Polski(Polish Hound)

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On 16/08/2019 at 18:23, M S E Refugee said:

We have just bought an 8 week old puppy and we are thinking about Pet Insurance,is it worth it or should I just save £20 a week towards any Vet bills.

It depends, how much did you pay for the puppy?

How much would you pay for a vets bill? Consider the likelihood of a bill that size, which should be remote if you know what you are doing with animals. Only sheep spend their lives trying to find completely novel ways to die, well sheep and one particular horse I owned.

If the bill comes to more than the cost of a puppy would you just get another puppy ? (I did with horses, never faced that with dogs)

I'm not a fan of insurance as most people don't need it.

I know someone whose son paid out £19k in vets bills (£6k was covered by insurance) for their 12 yr-old labrador that developed some sort of autoimmune disease. It made a complete recovery and lived another 18 months before dying of a heart attack running to its food bowl.

I know someone else who paid £1k to have a metal plate put in their rabbits leg when it broke it.  Ask yourself, are you those kind of owner ?

Just seen your dog breed (above)

It has a small population size and consequent low level of genetic variation. I haven't looked to see if there are any intrinsic defects that might make insurance worth while in your case. Again, that will depend upon your level of attachment to the animal. Having said that, you may also find that insurers exclude certain illnesses from policies on certain breeds, or they should do so as an encouragement to breeders to strive to correct them.

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A Polish hound will be costly to insure I suspect - weirdly, I only heard of that breed in the past week, it looks like it's a new breed to the UK that has been brought over here by Polish migrants. So you might find that it attracts pricey premiums.

That said, if I were getting a new puppy, I'd probably get insurance for at least the first 6 months. If you are unlucky to get a sickly dog or one prone to problems then it'll become apparent in that time and this is about the only time when insurance can be a 'good' spending choice. If there are no problems then I'd cancel it, you should have lost less than ~£150, and then just store £20 a month in a savings account.  Obviously if you do this, check the smallprint to make sure they'll actually pay out in the first few months.

 

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  • 2 weeks later...
11 hours ago, Happy Renting said:

All you need is third party, fire and theft.

Well yes, and fire is the big one if you keep dragons, or a phoenix. I saw it on Harry Potter, so I know it's true.

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 19/08/2019 at 14:50, sarahbell said:

A friend didn't buy it and her puppy had a fracture that cost her thousands in vets bills.

Around here they just used to get someone on social to pretend it’s theres and get donation type treatment obviesly more risk of ending up with it put down 

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M S E Refugee
On 19/08/2019 at 12:30, Hopeful said:

It depends, how much did you pay for the puppy?

How much would you pay for a vets bill? Consider the likelihood of a bill that size, which should be remote if you know what you are doing with animals. Only sheep spend their lives trying to find completely novel ways to die, well sheep and one particular horse I owned.

If the bill comes to more than the cost of a puppy would you just get another puppy ? (I did with horses, never faced that with dogs)

I'm not a fan of insurance as most people don't need it.

I know someone whose son paid out £19k in vets bills (£6k was covered by insurance) for their 12 yr-old labrador that developed some sort of autoimmune disease. It made a complete recovery and lived another 18 months before dying of a heart attack running to its food bowl.

I know someone else who paid £1k to have a metal plate put in their rabbits leg when it broke it.  Ask yourself, are you those kind of owner ?

Just seen your dog breed (above)

It has a small population size and consequent low level of genetic variation. I haven't looked to see if there are any intrinsic defects that might make insurance worth while in your case. Again, that will depend upon your level of attachment to the animal. Having said that, you may also find that insurers exclude certain illnesses from policies on certain breeds, or they should do so as an encouragement to breeders to strive to correct them.

As a Breed they are pretty healthy and have no major health concerns apart from canine hip dysplasia which I believe can affect any dog.

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Caravan Monster

Vets often tend to look disappointed when the answer to 'do you have insurance?' is a negative. Outside of puppy jabs at the beginning and the final visit to the vet, with a few exceptions, they are mostly taking shots in the dark as to what is wrong with the dog and if it can be effectively treated. One of the main exceptions would be sewing back together big cuts and setting broken bones, which worst case shouldn't come to more than about  £2.5k. I have seen inherited problems treated effectively, but it is rare that effective diagnosis and treatment is available, particularly with general non specialist vets.

My take is if you  can come up with two, maybe three thousand in an emergency, not to bother with insurance. It is a good idea ahead of time  to set out a protocol in case of the dog having an accident or being taken ill to assist clear thinking at a stressful time. I've always kept lurchers which although generally healthy, are injury prone because of their hunting drive and speed and they have all made it to old age without big bills or insurance. I get too attached to my dogs but with experience and hindsight wouldn't hesitate to euthanise once clearly established that they are unable to live a decent quality of life. The dog doesn't know anything anymore and the owner gets over it eventually.

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reformed nice guy

I have a terrier that was hit by a car last year. I took it to the local university vet hospital for treatment. They tidied up the wounds then told me it would cost £3000 for fixing a small fracture then another £2000 to do skin grafts as the legs were degloved. These costs did not include the cost of staying in.

I told them no and I would take him to a farm vet I knew. At one point they had 3 vets and 4 nurses in a small room telling me how wrong I was, guilting me to stay. I left.

The farm vet brought in a specialist to set the fracture, gave antibiotics and showed me how to change the dressing daily using aloe vera. Check ups decreased over time from every few days to once a fortnight over 3 months or so. Total cost £580.

The dog is now fine. You would only see the scar tissue if you brushed hair aside, he has no limp and he runs around as fast as before.

My advice is to find a rural vet (the one a farmer takes his sheepdog to if it was hit or having pups) and save £25 a month for potential costs. Its harsh to say, but I don't think a dog is worth spending thousands on. I have seen a lot of people spend £5k+ on vet bills to have a miserable looking dog hobble around and sleep 20 hours a day.

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On 19/08/2019 at 14:30, spunko said:

A Polish hound will be costly to insure I suspect - weirdly, I only heard of that breed in the past week, it looks like it's a new breed to the UK that has been brought over here by Polish migrants. So you might find that it attracts pricey premiums.

That said, if I were getting a new puppy, I'd probably get insurance for at least the first 6 months. If you are unlucky to get a sickly dog or one prone to problems then it'll become apparent in that time and this is about the only time when insurance can be a 'good' spending choice. If there are no problems then I'd cancel it, you should have lost less than ~£150, and then just store £20 a month in a savings account.  Obviously if you do this, check the smallprint to make sure they'll actually pay out in the first few months.

 

Similarly, I’d suggest the first year as they’re into everything during that period. You’ll get so many weeks cover with most vets following the injections. It’s usually with petplan. 

 

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6 hours ago, reformed nice guy said:

I have a terrier that was hit by a car last year. I took it to the local university vet hospital for treatment. They tidied up the wounds then told me it would cost £3000 for fixing a small fracture then another £2000 to do skin grafts as the legs were degloved. These costs did not include the cost of staying in.

I told them no and I would take him to a farm vet I knew. At one point they had 3 vets and 4 nurses in a small room telling me how wrong I was, guilting me to stay. I left.

The farm vet brought in a specialist to set the fracture, gave antibiotics and showed me how to change the dressing daily using aloe vera. Check ups decreased over time from every few days to once a fortnight over 3 months or so. Total cost £580.

The dog is now fine. You would only see the scar tissue if you brushed hair aside, he has no limp and he runs around as fast as before.

My advice is to find a rural vet (the one a farmer takes his sheepdog to if it was hit or having pups) and save £25 a month for potential costs. Its harsh to say, but I don't think a dog is worth spending thousands on. I have seen a lot of people spend £5k+ on vet bills to have a miserable looking dog hobble around and sleep 20 hours a day.

I think the cost has got ridiculous now. Most people wouldn’t spend that on their own, or a loved ones healthcare.

Vets are just a license to print money now.

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M S E Refugee
24 minutes ago, Tdog said:

My kids wanting a King Charles Cavalier Spaniel, how is it looking after a puppy ... is it akin to a baby where they're up crying all night?

I did have a dog as a kid but i was so young i cant remember this stage.

Yes we take it outside a couple of times in the early hours so she can have a piss or a shit.

Most of the time we manage to get her outside for the toilet but she has quite a few accidents in the house,she is also keen on chewing things mostly slippers,shoes and my hand.

I am 46 and I never really fancied having a dog it was for the missus really as she likes them,however I was wrong about dogs they are fantastic animals.

We haven't had a proper sleep since we got her a month ago it is very tiring but totally worth it.

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13 minutes ago, M S E Refugee said:

Yes we take it outside a couple of times in the early hours so she can have a piss or a shit.

Most of the time we manage to get her outside for the toilet but she has quite a few accidents in the house,she is also keen on chewing things mostly slippers,shoes and my hand.

I am 46 and I never really fancied having a dog it was for the missus really as she likes them,however I was wrong about dogs they are fantastic animals.

We haven't had a proper sleep since we got her a month ago it is very tiring but totally worth it.

Christ. Our lab was fine after three days and peed in the house once. 

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M S E Refugee
1 minute ago, Tdog said:

Cheers, imagine that'll get better before long.

Do you have some one to look after it during the day, as one day i might start working 9-5 and these days its frowned upon to leave them during the day.

My kids an only child hence she sees a dog as a surrogate sibling, will have to give in sooner or later.

 

The in-laws look after her for us 4 days a week and it was only because they were willing to look after her that we finally decided to get her as we didn't feel comfortable with leaving a dog for hours at a time,  dogs are quite needy and like to have company although I think that it is acceptable to leave them up to 4 hours at a time.

 

1 minute ago, One percent said:

Christ. Our lab was fine after three days and peed in the house once. 

From 8 weeks old?

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8 minutes ago, M S E Refugee said:

The in-laws look after her for us 4 days a week and it was only because they were willing to look after her that we finally decided to get her as we didn't feel comfortable with leaving a dog for hours at a time,  dogs are quite needy and like to have company although I think that it is acceptable to leave them up to 4 hours at a time.

 

From 8 weeks old?

Yep.  

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  • 1 month later...
On 8 September 2019 at 18:25, Battenberg said:

I think the cost has got ridiculous now. Most people wouldn’t spend that on their own, or a loved ones healthcare.

Vets are just a license to print money now.

I don't think it's very different to private healthcare for humans to be honest. I've just had treatment via Bupa so have seen the invoices that the hospital send to the insurer, £650 for an MRI for example. The vets wanted to give my cat an MRI £400, he was insured but I didn't want to put him through more tests when it was pretty obvious he had a brain tumour, which would have only been treated on a palliative basis and wouldn't have guaranteed he was in no pain. 

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 08/09/2019 at 19:50, Tdog said:

Cheers, imagine that'll get better before long.

Do you have some one to look after it during the day, as one day i might start working 9-5 and these days its frowned upon to leave them during the day.

My kids an only child hence she sees a dog as a surrogate sibling, will have to give in sooner or later.

 

cavaliers need company in my experience, so will have problems if left all day

they also have potential inherited problems so treatment will be expensive

cavapoos a safer bet

had someone with a cocker spaniel breathed in a seed which caused an abscess in the lung then sepsis, heart stopped during surgery, made full recovery - cost £7k, was only insured for £5k, was the 3rd time the vet had seen that problem this year, common with cockers as they are always sniffing in the undergrowth

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