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Libspero

What a difference 35 years makes..

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3 hours ago, Libspero said:

Sometimes it’s hard to appreciate how far we’ve come in (relatively) so little time..

 

 

Ok it's a cooperative. But if you wanted all that kit back then it would have set you back thousands in today's money.

You'd have to be pretty geeky to want to shell out that on something so useless unless you were making a career out of IT and it was a learning tool.

"So what do you use it for?" Well I use it to track what food I have got in the fridge. " .Talk about a sledge hammer to crack a nut. I guess they were the trail blazers, however, that got excited over nothing so most of the rest of us could join in when computers could actually do something.

Tbf I was always a bit of a computer luddite. When I was an accountant in private practice I used to just complete business starements of accounts from control accounts without recourse to trial balance or computer because after 30 years of doing it the mechanics fell together just using my brain. So hearing people need a computer to manage their fridge appears to lack commonsense.

Edited by crashmonitor

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29 minutes ago, crashmonitor said:

Ok it's a cooperative. But if you wanted all that kit back then it would have set you back thousands in today's money.

It’s presented as if it’s the first time the audience have ever heard of a computer..   which only adds to the surrealism.

Given how small the user pool was,  and how little you could actually do with them then,   it’s incredible to me that the idea ever took off. 

Thank god for early adopters..  I know for a fact it wouldn’t have been me!

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4 minutes ago, Libspero said:

It’s presented as if it’s the first time the audience have ever heard of a computer..   which only adds to the surrealism.

Given how small the user pool was,  and how little you could actually do with them then,   it’s incredible to me that the idea ever took off. 

Thank god for early adopters..  I know for a fact it wouldn’t have been me!

Yeah I dont fancy her either.

 

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1 hour ago, Libspero said:

It’s presented as if it’s the first time the audience have ever heard of a computer..   which only adds to the surrealism.

Given how small the user pool was,  and how little you could actually do with them then,   it’s incredible to me that the idea ever took off. 

Thank god for early adopters..  I know for a fact it wouldn’t have been me!

Back in 1982 I had an idea to combine the Black and Scholes option pricing model with mBasic to trade the financial markets...

There was, of course, nothing to plug it into

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Just now, Dave Bloke said:

35 years ago I was coding under Unix and emailing my friends over the Internet.... a bit like yesterday.

Karen Carpenter said that?

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It often surprises me how far back some technology goes. IIRC the New York Times went online in 1980, but it cost so much to download that nobody bothered. Cash machines started in 1973 and there were TV broadcasts in the New York area as early as the late 1920s.

I find it amusing that there are all these electric bikes and scooters around now. If only Sir Clive Sinclair had launched some sort of chunky plastic 80s 'E-Bike' instead of the C5 we might all be riding them now!

Edited by Austin Allegro

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3 minutes ago, Austin Allegro said:

It often surprises me how far back some technology goes. IIRC the New York Times went online in 1980, but it cost so much to download that nobody bothered. Cash machines started in 1973 and there were TV broadcasts in the New York area as early as the late 1920s.

I find it amusing that there are all these electric bikes and scooters around now. If only Sir Clive Sinclair had launched some sort of chunky plastic 80s 'E-Bike' instead of the C5 we might all be riding them now!

First electric car - 1834/1835.

https://auto.howstuffworks.com/fuel-efficiency/hybrid-technology/history-of-electric-cars1.htm

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Just now, Austin Allegro said:

Interesting - I knew electric cars were common around 1900-1910 but had no idea they went back that far.

In essence very simple running gear and simple tech.

Stood a good chance of being ubiquitous, battery tech would have been progressed much earlier, but cheap and vast volumes of fossil fuels put paid to that.

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1 hour ago, Panther said:

Back in 1982 I had an idea to combine the Black and Scholes option pricing model with mBasic to trade the financial markets...

There was, of course, nothing to plug it into

just offer hand jobs instead.

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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Macintosh_128K

Jan 1984

The heart of the computer was a Motorola 68000 microprocessor running at 7.8336 MHz, connected to 128 KB RAM shared by the processor and the display controller. The boot procedure and some operating system routines were contained in an additional 64 KB ROM chip. Apple did not offer RAM upgrades. Unlike the Apple II, no source code listings of the Macintosh system ROMs were offered.

The RAM in the Macintosh consisted of sixteen 4164 64k×1 DRAMs. The 68000 and video controller took turns accessing DRAM every four CPU cycles during display of the frame buffer, while the 68000 had unrestricted access to DRAM during vertical and horizontal blanking intervals. Such an arrangement reduced the overall performance of the CPU as much as 35% for most code as the display logic often blocked the CPU's access to RAM. This caused the computer to run slower than several of its competitors, despite the nominally high clock rate.[citation needed]

Mac 128s and 512s were commonly equipped with Micron-branded 4164 RAM chips for cost reasons, however Micron's quality control was poor and the chips were a common failure point.[citation needed]

 

Feb 2019

https://www.raspberrypi.org/magpi/raspberry-pi-4-specs-benchmarks/

  • SoC: Broadcom BCM2711B0 quad-core A72 (ARMv8-A) 64-bit @ 1.5GHz
  • GPU: Broadcom VideoCore VI
  • Networking: 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz 802.11b/g/n/ac wireless LAN
  • RAM: 1GB, 2GB, or 4GB LPDDR4 SDRAM
  • Bluetooth: Bluetooth 5.0, Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE)
  • GPIO: 40-pin GPIO header, populated
  • Storage: microSD
  • Ports: 2 × micro-HDMI 2.0, 3.5 mm analogue audio-video jack, 2 × USB 2.0, 2 × USB 3.0, Gigabit Ethernet, Camera Serial Interface (CSI), Display Serial Interface (DSI)
  • Dimensions: 88 mm × 58 mm × 19.5 mm, 46 g

1 x 7Mhz versus 4 x 1.5GHz

128Meg ram versus 4Gigabyte ram

$6,000 versus $40

 

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21 minutes ago, spygirl said:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Macintosh_128K

Jan 1984

The heart of the computer was a Motorola 68000 microprocessor running at 7.8336 MHz, connected to 128 KB RAM shared by the processor and the display controller. The boot procedure and some operating system routines were contained in an additional 64 KB ROM chip. Apple did not offer RAM upgrades. Unlike the Apple II, no source code listings of the Macintosh system ROMs were offered.

The RAM in the Macintosh consisted of sixteen 4164 64k×1 DRAMs. The 68000 and video controller took turns accessing DRAM every four CPU cycles during display of the frame buffer, while the 68000 had unrestricted access to DRAM during vertical and horizontal blanking intervals. Such an arrangement reduced the overall performance of the CPU as much as 35% for most code as the display logic often blocked the CPU's access to RAM. This caused the computer to run slower than several of its competitors, despite the nominally high clock rate.[citation needed]

Mac 128s and 512s were commonly equipped with Micron-branded 4164 RAM chips for cost reasons, however Micron's quality control was poor and the chips were a common failure point.[citation needed]

 

Feb 2019

https://www.raspberrypi.org/magpi/raspberry-pi-4-specs-benchmarks/

 

I was in awe of my speech synthesizer as a boy with one of these. The spellings you would have to use to achieving anything remotely intelligible were hilarious though.

Motorola 6809 chip but I think they ran a couple of hundred quid at the time. Shame they went bust. I suspect the 64k version could have rivalled the Commodore 64.

 

1024px-Dragon_32.jpg

Edited by MrLibertyRedux
Resize

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17 minutes ago, spygirl said:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Macintosh_128K

Jan 1984

The heart of the computer was a Motorola 68000 microprocessor running at 7.8336 MHz, connected to 128 KB RAM shared by the processor and the display controller. The boot procedure and some operating system routines were contained in an additional 64 KB ROM chip. Apple did not offer RAM upgrades. Unlike the Apple II, no source code listings of the Macintosh system ROMs were offered.

The RAM in the Macintosh consisted of sixteen 4164 64k×1 DRAMs. The 68000 and video controller took turns accessing DRAM every four CPU cycles during display of the frame buffer, while the 68000 had unrestricted access to DRAM during vertical and horizontal blanking intervals. Such an arrangement reduced the overall performance of the CPU as much as 35% for most code as the display logic often blocked the CPU's access to RAM. This caused the computer to run slower than several of its competitors, despite the nominally high clock rate.[citation needed]

Mac 128s and 512s were commonly equipped with Micron-branded 4164 RAM chips for cost reasons, however Micron's quality control was poor and the chips were a common failure point.[citation needed]

 

Feb 2019

https://www.raspberrypi.org/magpi/raspberry-pi-4-specs-benchmarks/

  • SoC: Broadcom BCM2711B0 quad-core A72 (ARMv8-A) 64-bit @ 1.5GHz
  • GPU: Broadcom VideoCore VI
  • Networking: 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz 802.11b/g/n/ac wireless LAN
  • RAM: 1GB, 2GB, or 4GB LPDDR4 SDRAM
  • Bluetooth: Bluetooth 5.0, Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE)
  • GPIO: 40-pin GPIO header, populated
  • Storage: microSD
  • Ports: 2 × micro-HDMI 2.0, 3.5 mm analogue audio-video jack, 2 × USB 2.0, 2 × USB 3.0, Gigabit Ethernet, Camera Serial Interface (CSI), Display Serial Interface (DSI)
  • Dimensions: 88 mm × 58 mm × 19.5 mm, 46 g

1 x 7Mhz versus 4 x 1.5GHz

128Meg ram versus 4Gigabyte ram

$6,000 versus $40

 

This still blows my mind. Commoditised chip fabrication on a scale big enough to make it this cheap is an outrageous achievement.

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8 minutes ago, MrLibertyRedux said:

I was in awe of my speech synthesizer as a boy with one of these. The spellings you would have to use to achieving anything remotely intelligible were hilarious though.

Motorola 6809 chip but I think they ran a couple of hundred quid at the time. Shame they went bust. I suspect the 64k version could have rivalled the Commodore 64.

 

1024px-Dragon_32.jpg

Got one in the loft somewhere, car boot a couple of years ago, haven't got round to even trying to power it up yet.

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