• Welcome to DOSBODS

     

    DOSBODS is free of any advertising.

    Ads are annoying, and - increasingly - advertising companies limit free speech online. DOSBODS Forums are completely free to use. Please create a free account to be able to access all the features of the DOSBODS community. It only takes 20 seconds!

     

Sign in to follow this  
Frank Hovis

Mobile phone delivery scam

Recommended Posts

You receive a mobile phone you didn't order; later there is another courier knock at your door and says it was a mistake and collects it.

The first one was genuine, though the crooks placed the order, the second is one of the crooks stealing it from you.

Worth knowing, and not necessarily limited to phones.

I posted because I might have been caught out.

The best solution looks to be to reject the original delivery "I haven't ordered this, take it back"

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-49450485

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Frank Hovis said:

You have apparently ordered in your name and accepted it; so you would have to pay for it.

I'm not really getting how someone ordered a phone on your behalf. If you havn't explicitly requested the goods then no contract of sale exists.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Frank Hovis said:

You have apparently ordered in your name and accepted it; so you would have to pay for it.

You would be down on that transaction.

Surely if you give it to the second person you’re then down a phone and the money, the idea behind the scam. At least with the first you get a phone that you’ve paid for. I get what you mean about refusing it in the first place however once you’ve got it you need to hang on to it until it’s sorted and tell the second one to do one as per @Calcutta.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, Battenberg said:

Surely if you give it to the second person you’re then down a phone and the money, the idea behind the scam. At least with the first you get a phone that you’ve paid for. I get what you mean about refusing it in the first place however once you’ve got it you need to hang on to it until it’s sorted and tell the second one to do one as per @Calcutta.

I didn't mean give it to the second one; however if you accept it and then sell it (as opposed to returning it) then you are liable for the new cost of the phone and will only partly offset that by selling it.

You will lose money.

You either reject it, my favoured option, or accept it and then contact the seller to say you didn't order it, you're not paying for it, and if they send you a prepaid return envelope they can have it back.

If you reject it then I agree that no contract of sale exists in the first place.

Tbh unless I'm expecting somebody I don't answer the door anyway but I sometimes do get caught coming in or going out.

And I have a tiny record of online purchases; less than one a year and one offs from different companies paid on credit card on secure websites. My payment details have never darkened the doors of PayPal, Amazon or eBay.

I use cash to buy things in RL except at two specific supermarket fuel stations.

I think I am an unlikely target; and this is without trying.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This must be a clever scam as even I, the cleverest man to have ever lived, don't understand it.:CryBaby:

My understanding is that there's only one phone - you get it delivered, but then the courier knocks and wants it back.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, spunko said:

This must be a clever scam as even I, the cleverest man to have ever lived, don't understand it.:CryBaby:

My understanding is that there's only one phone - you get it delivered, but then the courier knocks and wants it back.

A different man.

Dressed as a courier.

Who isn't really one but is stealing your phone. Politely.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

I didn't mean give it to the second one; however if you accept it and then sell it (as opposed to returning it) then you are liable for the new cost of the phone and will only partly offset that by selling it.

You still havn't said how someone managed to order it on your behalf. If you did not order it in the first place then you did not "accept" it in the sense of initiating a binding contract. If someone knocks on my door and says "heres a phone" with no conditions and I take it then I've just accepted a gift and no contract has been entered into.

Edited by goldbug9999

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, spunko said:

Aha. Alarm bells would ring though if it was a different man, surely.

Six hours later, afternoon shift, different person on.

Remember that they have placed the order so had the emails / texts telling them the time of delivery, the delivery company, and sometimes even the name of the person delivering.

You get the phone at 10am.

At 4pm someone wearing the same company uniform knocks on your door and says:

"Hello Mr Spunko, I'm sorry you're being bothered twice in the same day but my colleague Ken delivered a phone to you this morning but Vodafone have since contacted us to say they made a mistake and you didn't order it so asked us to pick it up to save you the bother of returning it."

He knows you, that you had a phone this morning from Ken, he is dressed in the right uniform, and you know you didn't order it and here he is confirming that you're right and removing your requirement to sort out the mistake yourself.

If you hadn't heard of the scam then you might just do that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, goldbug9999 said:

You still havn't said how someone managed to order it on your behalf. If you did not order it in the first place then you did not "accept" it in the sense of initiating a binding contract. If someone knocks on my door and says "heres a phone" with no conditions and I take it then I've just accepted a gift and no contract has been entered into.

They used your name, address and payment details but with their phone and email.

You have accepted the phone, and now given it away, so the onus is on you to prove that it wasn't you 

Probably you could do that eventually but a lot of people wouldn't. I know people who don't even check their credit card bills because they don't keep the receipts.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, goldbug9999 said:

Meaning what specifically ?

I would say credit card from a skim at a dodgy garage, pub or restaurant.

Or it could be these other ways of paying that I don't understand and don't wish to; as when people pay for groceries by waving their phone at a scanner.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, Frank Hovis said:

I would say credit card from a skim at a dodgy garage, pub or restaurant.

Or it could be these other ways of paying that I don't understand and don't wish to; as when people pay for groceries by waving their phone at a scanner.

 

I always use cash for small transactions. I am lucky enough never to have had, up until now, any card fraud. But I do know people who have, and it is a right pain.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Frank Hovis said:

They used your name, address and payment details but with their phone and email.

You have accepted the phone, and now given it away, so the onus is on you to prove that it wasn't you 

Probably you could do that eventually but a lot of people wouldn't. I know people who don't even check their credit card bills because they don't keep the receipts.

Don’t worry Frank. One of the things that keeps effecting my business is people who buy three items then claim only one was in the packet. The credit cards always favour the buyer. They’d investigate it and you wouldn’t be at financial loss.

Hell, you can even claim it’s not your signature and you’ll get your money back.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
30 minutes ago, Battenberg said:

Don’t worry Frank. One of the things that keeps effecting my business is people who buy three items then claim only one was in the packet. The credit cards always favour the buyer. They’d investigate it and you wouldn’t be at financial loss.

Hell, you can even claim it’s not your signature and you’ll get your money back.

Sorry to hear that but cheers for the real world clarification BB.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

Sorry to hear that but cheers for the real world clarification BB.

The "real world" is all to me. Sometimes I just don't believe the internet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Frank Hovis said:

You receive a mobile phone you didn't order; later there is another courier knock at your door and says it was a mistake and collects it.

The first one was genuine, though the crooks placed the order, the second is one of the crooks stealing it from you.

Worth knowing, and not necessarily limited to phones.

I posted because I might have been caught out.

The best solution looks to be to reject the original delivery "I haven't ordered this, take it back"

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-49450485

Thanks for posting @Frank Hovis, what seems like an innocuous event can mean more sinister thing going on. I recently started getting "here is your facebook reset code" emails which I ignored, but then one day got reset passwords for amazon, outlook etc. This made me panic as these sites "helpfully" store your credit card details. I know it's a bot trying to do it but it feels personal, and I know if they get a hit someone is going to have a go at getting in to my email by brute forcing it and taking over. I have since changed all my email accounts to 2FA (two factor authentication), and ditched the email account that didn't offer it..Virgin email! Keep 'em (digitally) peeled!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For those that dont know what two factor authentication is, it is just an option you can switch on which means they send a text or email (to a different account) that confirms it is you. It's a bit of a pain but worth doing for security.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Frank Hovis said:

I would say credit card from a skim at a dodgy garage, pub or restaurant.

Or it could be these other ways of paying that I don't understand and don't wish to

Are you serious ? - if I thought someone out there had access to my CC/bank card details I'd be much more worried about that than a few hundreds of quids worth of phone.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Realistically anyone receiving a parcel from a courier is likely to sign for it before they ever get to see what’s in the box.

Good to know that if it ever happens to always arrange return directly with the company involved and probably cancel your bank card.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, goldbug9999 said:

Are you serious ? - if I thought someone out there had access to my CC/bank card details I'd be much more worried about that than a few hundreds of quids worth of phone.

No, I mean I don't do PayPal and haven't got that or any other payment mechanisms set up on my phone or computer.

The few payments I have made over the internet, and it's certainly single figures with my current credit card, have had to be verified by my entering a code sent to my mobile phone (the bank had the number, I'm not entering) and one time by a phone call.

I don't know if this standard or whether my payments are so infrequent that they are always flagged as unusual activity.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.