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One percent

Incest, a game for all the family

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https://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-7422843/More-13-000-Britons-born-illegal-extreme-inbreeding.html

Scientists believe that more than 13,000 people in the UK have DNA which indicates they are the result of 'extreme inbreeding'.  

Analysis of the UK Biobank data-bank by researchers at the University of Queensland uncovered evidence of people with whose parents are considered to be first- or second-degree relatives.

This includes children created when parents and their offspring (first degree) have a child. 

It also assessed children born from the intercourse of half-siblings (second degree). 

The researchers say scaling up the research is difficult due to the limitations of the data-set, but claim the real number may be even higher than the extrapolated 13,200 figure from the paper. 

People born out of such extreme inbreeding often suffer myriad health concerns, the researchers confirm.  

This includes reduced lung function, fertility, cognitive function and a 44 per cent higher risk of all diseases. 

 

Interestingly, the article doesn’t say in which sections of the “community “ this is more likely to occur. 

Hint, they don’t say it’s in the indigenous population. Draw your own conclusions from this. o.O

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12 minutes ago, One percent said:

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-7422843/More-13-000-Britons-born-illegal-extreme-inbreeding.html

Scientists believe that more than 13,000 people in the UK have DNA which indicates they are the result of 'extreme inbreeding'.  

Analysis of the UK Biobank data-bank by researchers at the University of Queensland uncovered evidence of people with whose parents are considered to be first- or second-degree relatives.

This includes children created when parents and their offspring (first degree) have a child. 

It also assessed children born from the intercourse of half-siblings (second degree). 

The researchers say scaling up the research is difficult due to the limitations of the data-set, but claim the real number may be even higher than the extrapolated 13,200 figure from the paper. 

People born out of such extreme inbreeding often suffer myriad health concerns, the researchers confirm.  

This includes reduced lung function, fertility, cognitive function and a 44 per cent higher risk of all diseases. 

 

Interestingly, the article doesn’t say in which sections of the “community “ this is more likely to occur. 

Hint, they don’t say it’s in the indigenous population. Draw your own conclusions from this. o.O

Do the Cornish count as indigenous?:P

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Its an intersting topic - before that boring cunt kicks off.

UK has few gotos for inbreeding - West Country, Royal Family and, now, Mipuris.

I think you can get away with it yge odd time, with cousin marruages - see various victorians and Einstein.

But cousin after cousin. Nah.

The other area im curious about is ingpbreeding - knowingly or unknowingly on large social housing estates. These fuckers go nowhere, no travel, getting knocked up by Dazza round corner, who might turn out to be tge father and the uncle. Ive heard of a few cases where mums have gone nuts when they realise that new boyfriend might turn out to be half brother.

Mrspy n friends see the same old names turning up with the same wierd, thick as shit kids, flat faced, weird looking, generation after generation.

 

5 minutes ago, One percent said:

Not sure if that’s meant to challenge or support the article in the OP. 

Its a start.

There needs to be some metric on relation.

Id love to see the results on some of the people i know.

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2 minutes ago, spygirl said:

Its an intersting topic - before that boring cunt kicks off.

UK has few gotos for inbreeding - West Country, Royal Family and, now, Mipuris.

I think you can get away with it yge odd time, with cousin marruages - see various victorians and Einstein.

But cousin after cousin. Nah.

The other area im curious about is ingpbreeding - knowingly or unknowingly on large social housing estates. These fuckers go nowhere, no travel, getting knocked up by Dazza round corner, who might turn out to be tge father and the uncle. Ive heard of a few cases where mums have gone nuts when they realise that new boyfriend might turn out to be half brother.

Mrspy n friends see the same old names turning up with the same wierd, thick as shit kids, flat faced, weird looking, generation after generation.

 

Its a start.

There needs to be some metric on relation.

Id love to see the results on some of the people i know.

They used to say that t’ord spot was famous (infamous?) For inbreeding. 

Everyone seems to be related. o.O

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4 minutes ago, spygirl said:

Its an intersting topic - before that boring cunt kicks off.

UK has few gotos for inbreeding - West Country, Royal Family and, now, Mipuris.

I think you can get away with it yge odd time, with cousin marruages - see various victorians and Einstein.

But cousin after cousin. Nah.

The other area im curious about is ingpbreeding - knowingly or unknowingly on large social housing estates. These fuckers go nowhere, no travel, getting knocked up by Dazza round corner, who might turn out to be tge father and the uncle. Ive heard of a few cases where mums have gone nuts when they realise that new boyfriend might turn out to be half brother.

Mrspy n friends see the same old names turning up with the same wierd, thick as shit kids, flat faced, weird looking, generation after generation.

 

:)

For once, I couldn't agree with you more...!

You inter-bred Middlesbrough cunt...

;)

 

XYY

Edited by The XYY Man

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12 minutes ago, swiss_democracy_for_all said:

Do the Cornish count as indigenous?:P

 

10 minutes ago, One percent said:

Dunno, ask @Frank Hovis

 

Oi!

I'd have thought this was widespread through much of history and prehistory owing to the isolation of small groups of people - villages, islands, wandering bands - meaning that whilst siblings may not have had children the limited genetic range witin the group meant that the variety was very narrow.

Take St Kilda - highly isolated populatioon for centuries; everybody will have been closely related to everybody else.

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1 minute ago, Frank Hovis said:

 

 

Oi!

I'd have thought this was widespread through much of history and prehistory owing to the isolation of small groups of people - villages, islands, wandering bands - meaning that whilst siblings may not have had children the limited genetic range witin the group meant that the variety was very narrow.

Take St Kilda - highly isolated populatioon for centuries; everybody will have been closely related to everybody else.

St kilda’s wedding. One of my very favourite fiddle tunes. :)

love Scottish fiddle music. The best of all British traditional music. 

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A quick scan of that site claims to have some kind of genetic information on 488,000 people.

However, this figure appears to include an unknown number who have submitted information by imputing data - which I take to mean filling in the various online forms / surveys that exist on the site.

They seem to have data from numerous nationalities globally but which I assume were or are in the UK. 2,000 Germans, just under 1500 Pakistanis, some 4,000 Indians and so on. 

Oddly, my admittedly brief search did not find any mention of the individual UK nationalities.

The site is really difficult to navigate IMPO. Wank.

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1 hour ago, Frank Hovis said:

 

 

Oi!

I'd have thought this was widespread through much of history and prehistory owing to the isolation of small groups of people - villages, islands, wandering bands - meaning that whilst siblings may not have had children the limited genetic range witin the group meant that the variety was very narrow.

Take St Kilda - highly isolated populatioon for centuries; everybody will have been closely related to everybody else.

Yeah ok but they're talking about now. It's nigh on 200 years since people started moving around a lot more.

Didn't the Tahitians have a tradition of getting some of their young women to be impregnated by sailors, and thus they have one of the most mixed gene pools (and the most beautiful) in the world?  Or is this a myth?

 

 

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Just now, swiss_democracy_for_all said:

Yeah ok but they're talking about now. It's nigh on 200 years since people started moving around a lot more.

Didn't the Tahitians have a tradition of getting some of their young women to be impregnated by sailors, and thus they have one of the most mixed gene pools (and the most beautiful) in the world?  Or is this a myth?

 

 

Are they?

There have been many ludicrous overworkings of DNA evidence - that we are all descended from the "Six Daughters of Eve" being my especially favourite piece of conceit.

And given how utterly useless are the genetic ancestry DNA testings my automatic reaction to any DNA-based story is to disbelieve it.

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26 minutes ago, swiss_democracy_for_all said:

Yeah ok but they're talking about now. It's nigh on 200 years since people started moving around a lot more.

Didn't the Tahitians have a tradition of getting some of their young women to be impregnated by sailors, and thus they have one of the most mixed gene pools (and the most beautiful) in the world?  Or is this a myth?

 

 

I think you are confusing them with the Isle of Wight and the true purpose of Cowes week.

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26 minutes ago, swiss_democracy_for_all said:

Lucky you only have sons then!

 

That I know about.

My Cowes days were 20 odd years ago. My eldest is 19.

The risk is minimal but still a possibility.

Edited by Wight Flight

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1 hour ago, sleepwello'nights said:

There was a programme on BBC 4 tonight about Tutankhamun. It concluded that his parents were brother and sister. 

Was n’t that quite common in Ancient Egypt right up to the time of Cleopatra whose parents (Ptolemy XII and Cleopatra V Tryphaena)  were probably brother and sister. 

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23 minutes ago, Virgil Caine said:

Was n’t that quite common in Ancient Egypt right up to the time of Cleopatra whose parents (Ptolemy XII and Cleopatra V Tryphaena)  were probably brother and sister. 

Yep, to maintain the purity of the blood line. It had a major disadvantage that they were blissfully unaware of. 

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There's more to the inbreeding story. Paradoxically, IF inbreds can dodge the various genetic diseases, it's actually been shown to promote longevity in humans and animals.

https://www.newscientist.com/article/mg19726404-200-inbred-humans-live-to-a-ripe-old-age/

For instance, the ancient Egyptian Pharaoh Ramses II who lived to age 97 was the result of generations of parent-child etc. couplings.

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9 hours ago, Frank Hovis said:

 

 

Oi!

I'd have thought this was widespread through much of history and prehistory owing to the isolation of small groups of people - villages, islands, wandering bands - meaning that whilst siblings may not have had children the limited genetic range witin the group meant that the variety was very narrow.

Take St Kilda - highly isolated populatioon for centuries; everybody will have been closely related to everybody else.

Ive always assumed it depends on the access to a fresh gene pool bnd how accepting the population is.

I remember stories about Cook hitting island on the pacific and the mad scrabble of the women for the blokes.

My rule of thumb is that, pre-industrial revolution, you need to look for access to ports. The more inlad, away from mass transport, the more inbred.

Post industrial revolution, it seems to be access to factory/mass labour - i.e. all the hicks leaving the village to work in a big factory and meeting lots of new people.

I go to various areas and you can still both those factors at work. #1 wouldbe palces like witlshire, which are way awy from the sea nd never industrialised. Go to a few smaller town and the like - cleetus.

Some of the places around London with no train line are the same. esp the rurally home counties.

Then youve got the new inbred hill-billy - people who live in large social housing estates and never leave, dont drive, dont work, so sit around on bennies shaggin people who, it turns out, are their half-siblings as their dad n mum did the same, and their dad n mum ...

 

 

 

3 minutes ago, Turned Out Nice Again said:

There's more to the inbreeding story. Paradoxically, IF inbreds can dodge the various genetic diseases, it's actually been shown to promote longevity in humans and animals.

https://www.newscientist.com/article/mg19726404-200-inbred-humans-live-to-a-ripe-old-age/

For instance, the ancient Egyptian Pharaoh Ramses II who lived to age 97 was the result of generations of parent-child etc. couplings.

Thatsa big If.

 

 

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