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spygirl

Happy Fish

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I'm always fascinated by people who are just happy.   Sometimes I walk down the street and you see someone who just looks so happy and I think perhaps in a perfect world everyone should be like that.  

However, I'm not sure that it's actually ever real, at least not for long.

Eg, About a month or so back I met someone outside a supermarket, where I was waiting with the dog while someone else was in getting a couple of things (always a conversation point).  Anyway, this woman walked up and she was so happy.  She was a bit older than me, but still quite pretty despite her years and I thought what a pleasant looking woman. -- We started talking, and had a really nice conversation about the dog, the weather, etc.  Then she exclaimed 'oh, I can really feel my morphine patch kicking in now!', and she just got up and walked off, staggering slightly.

Oh well.

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3 minutes ago, dgul said:

I'm always fascinated by people who are just happy.   Sometimes I walk down the street and you see someone who just looks so happy and I think perhaps in a perfect world everyone should be like that.  

However, I'm not sure that it's actually ever real, at least not for long.

Eg, About a month or so back I met someone outside a supermarket, where I was waiting with the dog while someone else was in getting a couple of things (always a conversation point).  Anyway, this woman walked up and she was so happy.  She was a bit older than me, but still quite pretty despite her years and I thought what a pleasant looking woman. -- We started talking, and had a really nice conversation about the dog, the weather, etc.  Then she exclaimed 'oh, I can really feel my morphine patch kicking in now!', and she just got up and walked off, staggering slightly.

Oh well.

I have known some very rare individuals who are relentlessly cheerful whatever gets thrown at them.

I'm not amongst them!

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In my experience there are three types of cheerful people: 

1. People who have not had any major problems in life and so are able to maintain a 'Pollyanna' outlook on life. Often these tend to be young fluffy studenty type women. 

2. People who have had major problems in life but have been able to build up a positive front (even if they don't always feel it completely inside) through coming to terms with the human condition (ie, the law of sin and death) either through religion or philosophy (I would class myself in this group).

3. Naturally mentally resilient and strong people who have probably not made a study of it, they have just always been that way and life's sufferings seem to even make them stronger (Antarctic explorer Ernest Shackleton is one such who springs to mind) .  It's probably to do with very high natural levels of seratonin/dopamine in their brains. 

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19 minutes ago, dgul said:

I'm always fascinated by people who are just happy.   Sometimes I walk down the street and you see someone who just looks so happy and I think perhaps in a perfect world everyone should be like that.  

However, I'm not sure that it's actually ever real, at least not for long.

Eg, About a month or so back I met someone outside a supermarket, where I was waiting with the dog while someone else was in getting a couple of things (always a conversation point).  Anyway, this woman walked up and she was so happy.  She was a bit older than me, but still quite pretty despite her years and I thought what a pleasant looking woman. -- We started talking, and had a really nice conversation about the dog, the weather, etc.  Then she exclaimed 'oh, I can really feel my morphine patch kicking in now!', and she just got up and walked off, staggering slightly.

Oh well.

Thing is, people always remember someone who manages to smile without looking like:

tenor.gif

Or sincere, genuine, unlike a salesman or mental vicar.

Teeth n tits.

 

 

 

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52 minutes ago, Austin Allegro said:

In my experience there are three types of cheerful people: 

1. People who have not had any major problems in life and so are able to maintain a 'Pollyanna' outlook on life. Often these tend to be young fluffy studenty type women. 

2. People who have had major problems in life but have been able to build up a positive front (even if they don't always feel it completely inside) through coming to terms with the human condition (ie, the law of sin and death) either through religion or philosophy (I would class myself in this group).

3. Naturally mentally resilient and strong people who have probably not made a study of it, they have just always been that way and life's sufferings seem to even make them stronger (Antarctic explorer Ernest Shackleton is one such who springs to mind) .  It's probably to do with very high natural levels of seratonin/dopamine in their brains. 

I think I'm a 2.5. Been through no shortage of major life problems, accepted them, processed the feelings, learned from them and moved on. Feels like moving up a game level every time and I don't stay down for long. Fucking hurts at the time, though.

Edited by Alex
I wrote 3.5 first time because I'm clearly innumerate.

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4 minutes ago, dgul said:

They blame social media.  I blame the way they just keep on going on and on and on and on and on about mental health.

Yes, morbid introspection is, I believe, sometimes encouraged by the mental health profession, when most of the time people need to buck their ideas up. It's considered the worst sin in the world to tell a depressed person to pull themselves together, but if physical/chemical problems have been eliminated, then really that is what they need to do.  The best type of philosophical or religious outlook is also required; for example our Lord did not say 'go, sin and come back and we'll talk about it some more, rather He simply said 'Go - and sin no more'. Meaning, get on with your life. 

The problem is modern lifestyles are so unhealthy - stress, lack of exercise, poor diet, drugs, alcohol etc - that there's often a physical/chemical imbalance problem behind mental problems and until people sort that out they won't feel any better. 

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37 minutes ago, dgul said:

I'm always fascinated by people who are just happy.   Sometimes I walk down the street and you see someone who just looks so happy and I think perhaps in a perfect world everyone should be like that.  

However, I'm not sure that it's actually ever real, at least not for long.

Eg, About a month or so back I met someone outside a supermarket, where I was waiting with the dog while someone else was in getting a couple of things (always a conversation point).  Anyway, this woman walked up and she was so happy.  She was a bit older than me, but still quite pretty despite her years and I thought what a pleasant looking woman. -- We started talking, and had a really nice conversation about the dog, the weather, etc.  Then she exclaimed 'oh, I can really feel my morphine patch kicking in now!', and she just got up and walked off, staggering slightly.

Oh well.

I really love Fuerteventura. The locals always seem so pleasant and happy. I thought it was because it's sunny and relaxed, a holiday place.  So I was a bit disturbed when I sought some happy/calming pills to enable my neurotic missus to take a driving test back in Swissieland, and discovered that not only could I get them over the counter for a very low price, but the pharmacist also said  "oh yes. everyone takes them here!"

As you say, Oh well...

Edited by swiss_democracy_for_all

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10 minutes ago, swiss_democracy_for_all said:

I really love Fuerteventura. The locals always seem so pleasant and happy. I thought it was because it's sunny and relaxed, a holiday place.  So I was a bit disturbed when I sought some happy/calming pills to enable my neurotic missus to take a driving test back in Swissieland, and discovered that not only could I get them over the counter for a very low price, but the pharmacist also said  "oh yes. everyone takes them here!"

As you say, Oh well...

My first proxaz story bcak from mid 90s.

Woman at work was depressed as she was getting old, in debt, didnt have kids.

Went to GPs, diagnosed as mildly depressed, given Prozac.

Cheered her up so much, that shed didnt care about having a BF, so got really fat, spent even more money, so went bankrupt ~4 years later, house was repod, ended up in a council shithole flat.

And, afaik, i where she remains - 50 odd, no kids, no money.

Depression/sadness is a signal. You need to listen to it.

 

 

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2 minutes ago, spygirl said:

My first proxaz story bcak from mid 90s.

Woman at work was depressed as she was getting old, in debt, didnt have kids.

Went to GPs, diagnosed as mildly depressed, given Prozac.

Cheered her up so much, that shed didnt care about having a BF, so got really fat, spent even more money, so went bankrupt ~4 years later, house was repod, ended up in a council shithole flat.

And, afaik, i where she remains - 50 odd, no kids, no money.

Depression/sadness is a signal. You need to listen to it.

 

 

I only know one person who has been on the happy pills but it hasn't served to help them in the medium term.

One effect was similar to yours - instead of worrying about their level of debt they stopped worrying about it.  And took out more debt.  The house may well end up being repossessed.

Banks should be lobbying to have happy pills put into the water supply.

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6 minutes ago, spygirl said:

My first proxaz story bcak from mid 90s.

Woman at work was depressed as she was getting old, in debt, didnt have kids.

Went to GPs, diagnosed as mildly depressed, given Prozac.

Cheered her up so much, that shed didnt care about having a BF, so got really fat, spent even more money, so went bankrupt ~4 years later, house was repod, ended up in a council shithole flat.

And, afaik, i where she remains - 50 odd, no kids, no money.

Depression/sadness is a signal. You need to listen to it.

 

 

 

1 minute ago, Frank Hovis said:

I only know one person who has been on the happy pills but it hasn't served to help them in the medium term.

One effect was similar to yours - instead of worrying about their level of debt they stopped worrying about it.  And took out more debt.  The house may well end up being repossessed.

Banks should be lobbying to have happy pills put into the water supply.

 

Perhaps propanolol is a better happy pill than prozac, the locals in Fuerte are mostly at least still fit and tanned, though that may also be because there isn't much else to do except watersports.

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1 hour ago, dgul said:

I'm always fascinated by people who are just happy.   Sometimes I walk down the street and you see someone who just looks so happy and I think perhaps in a perfect world everyone should be like that.  

However, I'm not sure that it's actually ever real, at least not for long.

Eg, About a month or so back I met someone outside a supermarket, where I was waiting with the dog while someone else was in getting a couple of things (always a conversation point).  Anyway, this woman walked up and she was so happy.  She was a bit older than me, but still quite pretty despite her years and I thought what a pleasant looking woman. -- We started talking, and had a really nice conversation about the dog, the weather, etc.  Then she exclaimed 'oh, I can really feel my morphine patch kicking in now!', and she just got up and walked off, staggering slightly.

Oh well.

 

 

 

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24 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

Banks should be lobbying to have happy pills put into the water supply.

Now I understand 

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/3545684.stm

Traces of the antidepressant Prozac can be found in the nation's drinking water, it has been revealed.

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I've read that people that are pessimistic are more likely to make "better" decisions.

I cant help think people that are optimistic are more likely to be conned.

Well, i'm off to send my bank details to a Nigerian prince that needs my bank account to launder $50m. I get a 10% cut :) 

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17 minutes ago, swiss_democracy_for_all said:

OK. What's the difference exactly?

It's not a drug that works on your mental state, it stops you shaking, sweating etc and this can have a positive effect on your confidence/anxiety. It's often used for public speaking engagements for this reason as it helps to stop your voice quivering and sounding like a wet blanket.

Edited by honkydonkey

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1 minute ago, honkydonkey said:

It's not a drug that works on your mental state, it stops you shaking, sweating etc and this can have a positive effect on your confidence/anxiety. It's often used for public speaking engagements for this reason as it helps to stop your voice quivering. 

OK, makes sense, I've a vague memory that a fat alcoholic pro snooker player used to take it to stop the shakes.

Is that the global take on propanolol, or the UK take on it? I've noticed that the same medication is treated differently according to the country - for example the difference between the French approach to thyroid medication and British is night and day. Maybe not the meds, but the policy - in France they intervene a lot.  So maybe propanolol is considered to be a lower-risk happy pill for the Spanish? 

 I ask because it seems odd it should be in such widespread use in some places. It cost me less than 2 Euros for a pack, which suggests either government controlled pricing or it being sold on such a massive scale like aspirin or paracetamol. I was astonished.

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