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OK so I've noticed that bbc presenters have a habit of using "an" before a word starting with h E.g. an historic occasion. Sounds weird and award to me when the 'h' is also pronounced. Surely the point of an vs a is to interpose a consonant where none exists such as "an apple" so make it easier to say, if I really had to use an before historic I would say a-nistoric / an-istoric not an-historic but honestly I would normally just say "a historic occasion" or possibly pronounce the a as a capital i.e. "ay historic occasion".

I mean really where does this stop, do you say "I'm gong to book an holiday" (and yes I have heard some TV link person us an for holiday and it sounded ridiculous).

Edited by goldbug9999

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Standards have slipped so far in all forms of meedja, it's just embarrassing. 

My guess as to the reason why they use 'an' is because in their adoption of Estuary English, the 'h' has become silent.  So what they are actually saying is an istoric.  So, perhaps technically correct.  Right it is not though 

innit.  

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9 minutes ago, One percent said:

Standards have slipped so far in all forms of meedja, it's just embarrassing. 

My guess as to the reason why they use 'an' is because in their adoption of Estuary English, the 'h' has become silent.  So what they are actually saying is an istoric.  So, perhaps technically correct.  Right it is not though 

innit.  

I think it's quite a lot older than the advent of Estuary speak - I remember being taught it for "historic" when I was at junior school, and that was um, quite along time ago.

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Just now, Alonso Quijano said:

It is. As would be an hysterical person, but not a hopeless one. Must be the 'h'-'i' sound.

I learn Eeenglish good gringo!:D

Just now, One percent said:

But, it wouldn't be an history lesson.  

Because somehow that does not flow.O.o

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Just now, Fully Detached said:

I think it's quite a lot older than the advent of Estuary speak - I remember being taught it for "historic" when I was at junior school, and that was um, quite along time ago.

I was always taught it was only an if preceding a vowel. I went to school in the north though. o.O

1 minute ago, MrPin said:

I learn Eeenglish good gringo!:D

Because somehow that does not flow.O.o

No, so, what's the rule? 

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Ah, google yields this, which makes some sense:

Quote

It is a traditional rule of English that an can be used before words that begin with anH sound if the first syllable of that word is not stressed. Indeed, some traditionalists would say it must be used before such words. Since the first syllable of historic is unstressed, it is acceptable to use an before it.

So it's down to the stressing of the syllable, which explains why some words can have an "an" and others can't.

Either way, IMO there is absolutely no excuse under any circusmtances for the Americans working so hard to drop the H in herb.

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1 minute ago, One percent said:

I was always taught it was only an if preceding a vowel. I went to school in the north though. o.O

No, so, what's the rule? 

I don't know! There are hundreds of irregularities in German to catch out the tourist.

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Being blessed with an 'Artlepool accent, all aitches are automatically dropped.

Makes understanding "an" versus "a" a lot simpler for us in-bred Northern fuckwits.

Ironically, we often pronounce - and verbally mis-spell - aitch as "haitch"...

 

XYY

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49 minutes ago, One percent said:

Hopefully cunning will be along to set us reet. 

I can categorically state, without fear of contradiction, that a well hung man will be hanged at a hanging.

Does that help?

P.S. it is an hotel.

PPS if anyone says 'aitch', Mrs Cunning will be hissing like a viper with a cold sore.

 

To add, for Sadiq bus driver dad twat. It's city, not siddy.

Edited by Cunning Plan

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2 minutes ago, Cunning Plan said:

I can categorically state, without fear of contradiction, that a well hung man will be hanged at a hanging.

Does that help?

P.S. it is an hotel.

PPS if anyone says 'aitch', Mrs Cunning will be hissing like a viper with a cold sore.

 

To add, for Sadiq bus driver dad twat. It's city, not siddy.

Wonderful cunning and thank you. 

So, just to be completely accurate, my school was pretty poor then. O.o

it was oop north. 

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I thought it was because "h" used to be considered a vowel.

However in modern usage, about the only time we put "an" in front of a word starting with "h" is indeed "an historic..[occasion]"

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1 hour ago, goldbug9999 said:

OK so I've noticed that bbc presenters have a habit of using "an" before a word starting with h E.g. an historic occasion. Sounds weird and award to me when the 'h' is also pronounced. Surely the point of an vs a is to interpose a consonant where none exists such as "an apple" so make it easier to say, if I really had to use an before historic I would say a-nistoric / an-istoric not an-historic but honestly I would normally just say "a historic occasion" or possibly pronounce the a as a capital i.e. "ay historic occasion".

I mean really where does this stop, do you say "I'm gong to book an holiday" (and yes I have heard some TV link person us an for holiday and it sounded ridiculous).

Glad you picked up on this as it is a bugbear of mine, and yes it is totally retarded. A hysterical woman, a hissing snake, a historic event.  It's fucking simple and I've no idea why elements of the media persist with this spasticated use of  'an'.

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