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Frank Hovis

Lightning Maps

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This is fascinating; it records every lightning strike before slowly fading it out.

There are currently storms just crossing the south coast of Devon and Cornwall heading north and with a huge storm to follow sitting over the Channel Islands.

https://www.lightningmaps.org/?lang=sv#m=sat;r=0;t=3;s=0;o=0;b=;n=0;y=49.8307;x=-3.907;z=8;d=2;dl=2;dc=0;

(time limited - anyone clicking on this tomoorow will just see a map of the English Channel!)

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The accuracy of these sites is astounding. I hear thunder at exctly the time expected and once was close to a strike and came home to have a look exactly where it was and indeed they had it recorded perfectly. I must adit to sometimes having a look before going hill walking asthere have been some well publicised dreadful events in Brecon Beacons.

I will be having a look while out in the states too as last time we were there it was abit like a horror film on North Rim of Grand Canyon with trees being hit only a few 10s of metres from car.

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Interesting - and I wanted to find out how this worked. Was it a satellite? Someone with binoculars? I dug this up.

Blitzortung is a small project run by a handful of people in Germany that connects a network of hundreds of lightning sensors around the world to track lightning strikes within seconds of their striking the surface of the earth. As the site is based in Europe, they have hundreds of sensors concentrated around Germany, Austria, France, and Italy, with fewer in a multitude of other countries. The United States itself has 44 sensors that join a handful in other North and South American countries to keep tabs on our storm activity.

The process is simple (well, sort of). Let's say there's a thunderstorm over Dallas and a brilliant bolt of lightning strikes the center of the city. Most (if not all) of the detectors nearby sense the bolt. Depending on how many sensors detected the bolt, the system can triangulate the location of the lightning to within a few hundred to a few thousand feet of where it struck, and it plots the point on a map. From the strike to plotting it on the map can take as little as four seconds.

http://thevane.gawker.com/blitzortung-is-one-of-the-best-most-mesmerizing-websit-1589722466

 

What is a lightning sensor? It might look like one of these

188610main_Lightning_Sensor.jpg

Source https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/hurricanes/archives/2007/lightning_hurricane.html

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FREE YOUTUBE IDEA ALERT

Someone could set up a storm chasing youtube channel with that map - it is incredibly valuable information.

33 minutes ago, Happy Renting said:

It doesn't work. I clicked on Basingstoke and was unable to cause a single lightning strike,

That function is coming soon. Although you may have to pay by paypal. £500 a strike?

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1 hour ago, Uptherebels said:

You can use Blitzortung too. Web site is OK, but the app is brilliant. 

Is that available on android? I had a quick look and there are two apps that reference blitzortung but nothing seemed to be by them.

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33 minutes ago, SirGaz said:

Is that available on android? I had a quick look and there are two apps that reference blitzortung but nothing seemed to be by them.

Yes it is. I re downloaded it earlier today. I've been using it for years. It's definitely on google play store. 

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3 hours ago, 201p said:

FREE YOUTUBE IDEA ALERT

Someone could set up a storm chasing youtube channel with that map - it is incredibly valuable information.

That function is coming soon. Although you may have to pay by paypal. £500 a strike?

We could crowdfund thunderstorms.

It would be good if this lightning website could be combined with FlightAware, so we could watch aircraft in thunderstorms plummeting in flames in real time.

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3 hours ago, 201p said:

Interesting - and I wanted to find out how this worked. Was it a satellite? Someone with binoculars? I dug this up.

Blitzortung is a small project run by a handful of people in Germany that connects a network of hundreds of lightning sensors around the world to track lightning strikes within seconds of their striking the surface of the earth. As the site is based in Europe, they have hundreds of sensors concentrated around Germany, Austria, France, and Italy, with fewer in a multitude of other countries. The United States itself has 44 sensors that join a handful in other North and South American countries to keep tabs on our storm activity.

The process is simple (well, sort of). Let's say there's a thunderstorm over Dallas and a brilliant bolt of lightning strikes the center of the city. Most (if not all) of the detectors nearby sense the bolt. Depending on how many sensors detected the bolt, the system can triangulate the location of the lightning to within a few hundred to a few thousand feet of where it struck, and it plots the point on a map. From the strike to plotting it on the map can take as little as four seconds.

http://thevane.gawker.com/blitzortung-is-one-of-the-best-most-mesmerizing-websit-1589722466

 

What is a lightning sensor? It might look like one of these

188610main_Lightning_Sensor.jpg

Source https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/hurricanes/archives/2007/lightning_hurricane.html

I think Mrs XYY wants that back.

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Those of us of a more scientific persusion know that the met-office has had the data for the last 10 years or so.

http://www.metoffice.gov.uk/public/weather/observation/map/gcp46pp1c#?zoom=9&map=Lightning&fcTime=1500359400&lon=-1.31&lat=51.06

I guess other websites either pinch the data or have a licence to use it!

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4 minutes ago, Chewing Grass said:

Those of us of a more scientific persusion know that the met-office has had the data for the last 10 years or so.

http://www.metoffice.gov.uk/public/weather/observation/map/gcp46pp1c#?zoom=9&map=Lightning&fcTime=1500359400&lon=-1.31&lat=51.06

I guess other websites either pinch the data or have a licence to use it!

I do hope some nerd takes that data and designs a website where we can replay our favourite thunderstorms of yore.

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