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Sgt Hartman

Woodburner installing.

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Any experts on woodburners here? I'm hoping to rip out a naff old gas fireplace later this year and install a woodburner. 

Now I know the chimney needs a liner however there is one in there already which looks very much like the ones required for a woodburner. I know there are different grades but this does look like the grade needed. Is there any way of telling? 

I've heard of some liners being suitable for both but I'm buggered if I know how to tell. Any info would be much appreciated as if I can use it, it will save me a fecking fortune.

Cheers DOSBOD'ers!

:Beer:

 

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You need a certified installer nowadays to do it legally/for onward sale of house and paperwork. So might as well get someone in to do it - they can look at the install and advise on cost and whether worthwhile before you start.

Do you have a supply of wood - i.e. can you get some cheap as otherwise some of the benefits (at least financially) are dubious. You need good well seasoned wood, anything else just won't give out the heat and becomes more of a liability with low heat output (you end up just generating steam that goes up the flue), tar build up and fire risk. You need flue, access for rodding and cleaning, height requirements of flue above roof eave/slope, inflammable hearth of specified size, all sorts. Worth doing properly. 

 

 

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Apparently, new installations need inspecting by an inspector. Don't install too big a stove as bigger is not usually better. Only burn seasoned wood i.e. stuff that has dried for 12 months. Avoid burning MDF, chipboard, osb, etc as these are rammed full of nasty stuff that can produce dioxins, if you must put the odd piece in (rather than wasting time and effort going to the tip) mix it with seasoned hardwood.

Above all remember that decent stoves cost decent money and it can take quite a while to recoup the cost and if you buy logs you never will.

Biggest thing to remember is don't annoy your neighbours by producing visible or smelly smoke as they can/will be a pain in the arse.

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36 minutes ago, onlyme said:

You need a certified installer nowadays to do it legally/for onward sale of house and paperwork. So might as well get someone in to do it - they can look at the install and advise on cost and whether worthwhile before you start.

Do you have a supply of wood - i.e. can you get some cheap as otherwise some of the benefits (at least financially) are dubious. You need good well seasoned wood, anything else just won't give out the heat and becomes more of a liability with low heat output (you end up just generating steam that goes up the flue), tar build up and fire risk. You need flue, access for rodding and cleaning, height requirements of flue above roof eave/slope, inflammable hearth of specified size, all sorts. Worth doing properly. 

 

 

 

33 minutes ago, Chewing Grass said:

Apparently, new installations need inspecting by an inspector. Don't install too big a stove as bigger is not usually better. Only burn seasoned wood i.e. stuff that has dried for 12 months. Avoid burning MDF, chipboard, osb, etc as these are rammed full of nasty stuff that can produce dioxins, if you must put the odd piece in (rather than wasting time and effort going to the tip) mix it with seasoned hardwood.

Above all remember that decent stoves cost decent money and it can take quite a while to recoup the cost and if you buy logs you never will.

Biggest thing to remember is don't annoy your neighbours by producing visible or smelly smoke as they can/will be a pain in the arse.

Good info, thanks.

I've got access to wood, got a chainsaw, van and I chop down trees for people so got a good supply. Also got a good place for seasoning so happy days.

I was going to do as much of it as I could then get the bod in to sign it off for insurance, paperwork etc. If the liner is cack then I'll be coughing up for scaffolding which won't be cheap. 

If it has to be done it has to be done :)

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1 minute ago, Sgt Hartman said:

 

Good info, thanks.

I've got access to wood, got a chainsaw, van and I chop down trees for people so got a good supply. Also got a good place for seasoning so happy days.

I was going to do as much of it as I could then get the bod in to sign it off for insurance, paperwork etc. If the liner is cack then I'll be coughing up for scaffolding which won't be cheap. 

If it has to be done it has to be done :)

Sounds good on the wood front, sorted.

In most cases you'll be able to get away with a cheap aluminium tower scaffold hire, easy and quick to put up by installer - they only have to lift up the liner (if needed) and cap the top / install vent  whatever is needed. I think weekend rates are cheaper.

 

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17 minutes ago, onlyme said:

Sounds good on the wood front, sorted.

In most cases you'll be able to get away with a cheap aluminium tower scaffold hire, easy and quick to put up by installer - they only have to lift up the liner (if needed) and cap the top / install vent  whatever is needed. I think weekend rates are cheaper.

 

Cool beans. My roof is a bit high and the stack is tall so potentially awkward scaffolding wise. If I can get a reasonable price for it I'll get them to do the lot. The liner isn't something I want to bugger up.

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7 minutes ago, Sgt Hartman said:

Cool beans. My roof is a bit high and the stack is tall so potentially awkward scaffolding wise. If I can get a reasonable price for it I'll get them to do the lot. The liner isn't something I want to bugger up.

Also get two/three quotes/assessments of what you already have and get it done over the next few months or early summer - as weather warming up spending money on heating not top of people's minds and hell of a lot of installers started up over last few years - you might get lucky and one desperate for work in the quiet(er) period would expect late summer cost to be higher. Also don't skim on the stove itself. It won't be cheap but if you have supply of wood then that's where you'll save.

 

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5 minutes ago, onlyme said:

Also get two/three quotes/assessments of what you already have and get it done over the next few months or early summer - as weather warming up spending money on heating not top of people's minds and hell of a lot of installers started up over last few years - you might get lucky and one desperate for work in the quiet(er) period would expect late summer cost to be higher. Also don't skim on the stove itself. It won't be cheap but if you have supply of wood then that's where you'll save.

 

Virtual beer to you sir. Many thanks.

:Passusabeer:

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1 minute ago, Sgt Hartman said:

Virtual beer to you sir. Many thanks.

:Passusabeer:

No problem.

Let me know how it goes - will be installing one too but depends on other works and with regs issues won't be doing much myself other than finishing as so much else to do.

Have you picked a stove - mate has a Skan, modern job and it is awesome.

https://www.thestoveyard.com/dan-skan-stoves/filteredsearch/1/N/filter/StovesbyBrand/Dan Skan

Oh forgot to mention incoming air vent - if you can, pipe a proper incoming air vent from outside (through O/S wall or under floor  need be) depending on location. helps a lot with draw and you don't have a draughty hole/vent in the wall. Installer will advise options.

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1 minute ago, onlyme said:

No problem.

Let me know how it goes - will be installing one too but depends on other works and with regs issues won't be doing much myself other than finishing as so much else to do.

Have you picked a stove - mate has a Skan, modern job and it is awesome.

https://www.thestoveyard.com/dan-skan-stoves/filteredsearch/1/N/filter/StovesbyBrand/Dan Skan

Oh forgot to mention incoming air vent - if you can, pipe a proper incoming air vent from outside (through O/S wall or under floor  need be) depending on location. helps a lot with draw and you don't have a draughty hole/vent in the wall. Installer will advise options.

 

Those stoves are lovely but oof! Thats some price tag!

Quite interested in a Stovax 5. Got a good reputation and it's not too big, the room is quite small so I don't want something like a nuclear reactor sat there. 5kw should be perfect for the room size.

http://www.stovax.com/stove-fire/stockton-wood-multi-fuel-stoves/stockton-5/

Essentially  what I'm going to try and do is turn my front room into something resembling a cosy pub (that is not, I repeat, not the description I gave to Mrs Hartman) carpet up and old, original floorboards restored, wallpaper redoing and completely redecorated.

I'm probably biting off way more than I can chew but I think it will be brilliant when it's done. I'll update the thread as I go along, won't be for a while yet though!

 

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2 minutes ago, Sgt Hartman said:

 

Those stoves are lovely but oof! Thats some price tag!

Quite interested in a Stovax 5. Got a good reputation and it's not too big, the room is quite small so I don't want something like a nuclear reactor sat there. 5kw should be perfect for the room size.

http://www.stovax.com/stove-fire/stockton-wood-multi-fuel-stoves/stockton-5/

Essentially  what I'm going to try and do is turn my front room into something resembling a cosy pub (that is not, I repeat, not the description I gave to Mrs Hartman) carpet up and old, original floorboards restored, wallpaper redoing and completely redecorated.

I'm probably biting off way more than I can chew but I think it will be brilliant when it's done. I'll update the thread as I go along, won't be for a while yet though!

 

Blimey - those prices have gone up a lot, at least from what I remember! Ooof indeed.

Yes, no point putting in anything over-rated, you want it running efficiently - i.e. hot and clean burning. Stovax as far as I know have good rep.

Post here when you lift the carpet for floorboards if not already exposed - you may have to seal joints and if any serious woodworm don't even  think about sanding down, you'll end up filling holes/resanding in an endless loop.

 

 

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1 minute ago, onlyme said:

 

Post here when you lift the carpet for floorboards if not already exposed - you may have to seal joints and if any serious woodworm don't even  think about sanding down, you'll end up filling holes/resanding in an endless loop.

 

 

Will do, I'll be keeping the carpet just in case it has to go back down again for any of the reasons you've described! :Beer:

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13 minutes ago, Sgt Hartman said:

Quite interested in a Stovax 5. Got a good reputation and it's not too big, the room is quite small so I don't want something like a nuclear reactor sat there. 5kw should be perfect for the room size.

Had a Stovax Brunell since 1995 of about the same output, back in those days this was seriously exotic stuff, had to drive 60 miles to a back street shop in Hanley, Stoke to get it and its was over £600 back then.

Superb quality back then and has run faultlessly since.

You've obviously done the right amount of research, good choice, never buy a chinese one from machine mart.

The Hobbit by squirrel stoves is a very nice small one thats fantastic for a small room, fits in a standard opening and is also the number one choice for narrow boats.

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The thread I didn't want to see on here right now :CryBaby: Found out yesterday I've got a wonky chimney (oo-err) that needs repointing and various other things.  All I wanted was for it to be lined. 

My advice! Stay well away, chimneys are a bloody nightmare. 

 

I had a stovax in the old house, was faultless. Now I've got an Arada Aarow as main one and in the dining room a Jydepejsen. Haven't met anyone who has heard of them, Danish apparently, yet but they've got very good reviews online. 

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I looked at those hobbit ones, they are a close second on the list to the stovax, lovely looking things.

Been properly warned off the Chinese stuff, a mate, who is a bit of a tightarse, had one fitted. It's utter crap.

Quite nice to be able to chat about burners, Mrs Hartman just holds up the finger of silence when I start. I've been planning this for ages!

 

Edited by Sgt Hartman

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2 minutes ago, spunko2010 said:

The thread I didn't want to see on here right now :CryBaby: Found out yesterday I've got a wonky chimney that needs repointing and various other things.  All I wanted was for it to be lined. 

My advice! Stay well away, chimneys are a bloody nightmare. 

Sounds like they'll have to dismantle the top if "wonky" and rebuild.

Might be cheaper to remove entirely to roof line if not wanted and roof tile over void, or just reduce height and cap off if never going to be used and not wanted.

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2 minutes ago, spunko2010 said:

The thread I didn't want to see on here right now :CryBaby: Found out yesterday I've got a wonky chimney that needs repointing and various other things.  All I wanted was for it to be lined. 

My advice! Stay well away, chimneys are a bloody nightmare. 

I had mine repointed by Bojit & Son, last year. Still leaks a bit, I'm hoping the burner dries it out to be honest. 

It had been leaking for years and the previous owner did what everyone should do if a significant leak is discovered. Lay down some newspaper and forget about it, the dates on the paper was 2007. It had been leaking for a decade.

The twonk.

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4 minutes ago, onlyme said:

Sounds like they'll have to dismantle the top if "wonky" and rebuild.

Might be cheaper to remove entirely to roof line if not wanted and roof tile over void, or just reduce height and cap off if never going to be used and not wanted.

Nothing is cheap or easy - it's Grade II listed sadly. :ph34r:

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1 minute ago, spunko2010 said:

If I wasn't so close to the road I'd crack on and do it but there's some bloody nosey old woman who constantly eyes up anything that moves.

Invite her round for a chimney gazing party during the next storm. :ph34r:

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I actually heat my place with a wood stove and have done so for many years.  First question would be whether you are going air tight or regular.  Next suggestion is to go cast iron as opposed to steel.  If it is fitted with fire brick toss them out.  Consider that a good percentage of the heat comes off the stove pipe rather than the stove itself so maximize the length of that.  I use a stainless steel insulated chimney and highly recommend them.  When fitting consider how you are going to clean it.   For the wood supply you need a chain saw and a log splitter.  I use the lectric for both because it always works.  If you have it available consider going with anthracite instead of wood.  It is far superior but really requires a stainless steel fire box which may be pricey.  I made my own and never looked back.  I can burn coal or wood and that can be handy.  Keep in mind that the heat given off a hot surface is proportional to the fourth power of the temperature, so small and hot is way, way more efficient than large and warm.  Coal burns way hotter than wood.   Running on wood right now since it grows on trees around here.  Ask me anything. 

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Never go for an inset stove. We did (on missus' insistence it looked nicer) and while it does its best it is not warm enough on very cold days. If it hadn't cost £2K including chimney being redone (we went with a ceramic lining rather than stainless steel). The chap that installed it simply climbed up the ladder...

And yes, I no longer take decisions based on the missus' random preferences. It was probably worth £2K to learn that. 

Edited by SCC

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