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North facing windows in rooms


UmBongo
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Hi chaps and chapesses. My first question in the Knowledge base subforum.

The bedroom in my flat felt extremely cold over the winter, unless I turn the central heating on. It is the only room to have solely a north facing window that gets no sunshine, unlike the living room or the kitchen (east facing window). Does the aspect of the window play a part of in how a room retains it's warmth?

In comparison, my living room next to it is double aspect with both a north and south facing windows but does not feel cold at all, quite cosy even on cold days.

Another possibility might be that my downstairs neighbour (older guy, retired) is in most of the day and has the heat on in his living room. Perhaps he doesn't bother with heating the bedroom for cost purposes. I also wonder if the cavity wall insulation may have failed on the north facing wall of the block. :/

Any ideas welcomed. :)

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Carl Fimble

The sun, or lack thereof seems to make quite a difference in our house. We have windows facing more or less north and south, and the ones with south facing windows are way warmer once the sun has been up for a while, even in the middle of winter. 

 

Edited by Carl Fimble
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Bricks & Mortar

Yeah, the sun.  But I also don't heat my bedroom at all, because that's how I learned to sleep as a child.  Your neighbour may be similar.

Hard to say if the cavity wall insu failed.  What age is the house?  Do you know if it definitely has CWI?  Do you know what kind?

If you're putting heat into the room, you'll be losing most of it through the weakest link in the insulation. 
Are there any obvious draughts?
Heat rises, so most of your heat hits the ceiling.  Is it insulated?
If it is, I'd consider the window next.  Is it a good one with no draughts?
You mentioned the cavity wall insu CWI - any sign of dampness or draughts?
You mentioned the downstairs neighbour.  I don't heat my bedroom either, I just like it that way.  Is the floor insulated? 
 

Basically, what I'm saying is, you should work out where most heat is lost and attend to that first.

 

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Thanks for the replies @Bricks & Mortar & @Carl Fimble

I live in a middle floor flat built 51 years ago, so no attic or ceiling to insulate. There are no obvious draughts or damp. Floor has very thick carpet and underlay.

I have my desktop PC in my bedroom so I use this room quite a lot. There isn't a huge amount of light coming through this window so I would conclude that it's lack of sunlight.

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Bricks & Mortar
On 18/03/2020 at 07:51, UmBongo said:

Thanks for the replies @Bricks & Mortar & @Carl Fimble

I live in a middle floor flat built 51 years ago, so no attic or ceiling to insulate. There are no obvious draughts or damp. Floor has very thick carpet and underlay.

I have my desktop PC in my bedroom so I use this room quite a lot. There isn't a huge amount of light coming through this window so I would conclude that it's lack of sunlight.

Well, the lack of Sun is obviously the root cause, and you can't do anything about that.  It's very common for North facing rooms to be colder.
All you could really do, is try to add insulation to stop any heat you put in yourself from escaping.

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Carl Fimble

Just thinking, does your window have the wee vents that you can open and close? 

Is there a reasonable seal under the door when it's closed?

I suspect Bricks and Mortar is rught, north facing rooms are colder, I'm just wondering about draughts. 

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OurDayWillCome
On 24/03/2020 at 06:30, UmBongo said:

There are no draughts that I noticed. I'm happy to conclude that it's just the orientation of the window. 

Flip the house ;-)

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swiss_democracy_for_all

If you own the flat you could consider putting a fancy window in, triple glazed with argon between the panes - not cheap but they make a huge difference. 

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1 hour ago, swiss_democracy_for_all said:

If you own the flat you could consider putting a fancy window in, triple glazed with argon between the panes - not cheap but they make a huge difference. 

It's a council flat, so I doubt it would be feasible. Besides, the warmer weather is coming. :)

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Kurt Barlow
On 13/03/2020 at 17:31, UmBongo said:

Hi chaps and chapesses. My first question in the Knowledge base subforum.

The bedroom in my flat felt extremely cold over the winter, unless I turn the central heating on. It is the only room to have solely a north facing window that gets no sunshine, unlike the living room or the kitchen (east facing window). Does the aspect of the window play a part of in how a room retains it's warmth?

In comparison, my living room next to it is double aspect with both a north and south facing windows but does not feel cold at all, quite cosy even on cold days.

Another possibility might be that my downstairs neighbour (older guy, retired) is in most of the day and has the heat on in his living room. Perhaps he doesn't bother with heating the bedroom for cost purposes. I also wonder if the cavity wall insulation may have failed on the north facing wall of the block. :/

Any ideas welcomed. :)

Its not only the window (although this will be the main factor) but the fact the wall is north facing so will suffer the greatest chill factor from the external environment. 

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