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Carl Fimble

We don't want their worst, we don't need their average and we shouldn't take their best.

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Perhaps the exceptional talent has suffered at the hands of the regime back “home” and feels threatened, alienated and discriminated against. Perhaps they fear for their life.

In those cases it would be morally acceptable to allow them to migrate and make a contribution to the new country.

I feel I know a little bit about this, as all the above applies to me.

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11 minutes ago, The XYY Man said:

Agreed Carl.

We don't want Jock mongrels like you coming down here and fucking up our beautiful English race...

 

XYY

Bagpipes should be kept in the Victorian Scottish fantasy that never was.

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Posted (edited)
Just now, MrPin said:

Bagpipes should be kept in the Victorian Scottish fantasy that never was.

Is that the fantasy portrayed on the shortbread tins you can buy at Gretna Green - with all that roamin' in the gloamin' shite...?

Nowhere on Earth thrusts more expensive Jock tat upon you as Gretna Green. You can get a kilt in your English family tartan for 500 quid...

 

XYY

Edited by The XYY Man

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Just now, wherebee said:

I emigrated because the opportunities here in Australia were better than the UK.  However, it meant that the UK missed out on my skills, and my tax, for almost 20 years and counting so far.  I've contributed to Australia by:

  • Having employment for every single day I was on the land
  • Paying tax for every single day I was on the land
  • Speaking and reading the language to a high standard, not requiring any gvt money to be spent on comms
  • Not breaking the law
  • Following societal norms 
  • Fitting in with the natives in terms of culture and custom

 

I would guess that 95% of the immigrants to the UK in the past 20 years fail one of the above tests.

Yeah, but what about all them poor innocent kangaroos that you've fucked...?

 

XYY

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I don't mind gaps being filled. I mind people here doing f all not being trained up as first option.

I don't mind genuine refugees escaping islamic shitholes 'cos islam. Just leave the cause of the shitholeness back in the country of origin, or fuck off.

Also, take some responsibility and sort your own governments/regimes out. It's what practically every other nation on earth has had to do at some point and it's coming round again.

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1 hour ago, wherebee said:

I emigrated because the opportunities here in Australia were better than the UK.  However, it meant that the UK missed out on my skills, and my tax, for almost 20 years and counting so far.  I've contributed to Australia by:

  • Having employment for every single day I was on the land
  • Paying tax for every single day I was on the land
  • Speaking and reading the language to a high standard, not requiring any gvt money to be spent on comms
  • Not breaking the law
  • Following societal norms 
  • Fitting in with the natives in terms of culture and custom

 

I would guess that 95% of the immigrants to the UK in the past 20 years fail one of the above tests.

You missed off:

Moan about the weather

Moan about the food

Moan about the beer

Moan about everything that's different to what you're used to.

😂

Sorry, couldn't resist.

"Brits, the only people on the planet who go to someone else's country and consider the people there to be foreigners"

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1 minute ago, Option5 said:

You missed off:

Moan about the weather  never, love it in victoria

Moan about the food never, chicken parma is the dogs

Moan about the beer never, beer here is awesome

Moan about everything that's different to what you're used to. actually can think of one think - shit broadband

😂

Sorry, couldn't resist.

"Brits, the only people on the planet who go to someone else's country and consider the people there to be foreigners"

 

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25 minutes ago, Option5 said:

The chicken Parma reference could get you in big trouble with a certain party on here. :Old:

Especially if it's not properly greasy.

6 hours ago, Bkkandrew said:

Perhaps the exceptional talent has suffered at the hands of the regime back “home” and feels threatened, alienated and discriminated against. Perhaps they fear for their life.

In those cases it would be morally acceptable to allow them to migrate and make a contribution to the new country.

I feel I know a little bit about this, as all the above applies to me.

I'm not exporting myself now. I could have done it earlier on.

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It is the strange racist reality of pro-migration -- the more 'useful necessary' the migrant's skills are, the more their skills are being stolen from their home country. 

The great poster-child of this is the healthcare industry -- For some reason it is regarded as 'good' that we steal individuals from countries that have bothered to train them for their own medical needs.  I'd accept this if the UK's healtcare needs had been sprung upon us in recent years, but our demographic changes have been clear for decades, and yet the country didn't bother to invest in it's training etc.  

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Just now, dgul said:

It is the strange racist reality of pro-migration -- the more 'useful necessary' the migrant's skills are, the more their skills are being stolen from their home country. 

The great poster-child of this is the healthcare industry -- For some reason it is regarded as 'good' that we steal individuals from countries that have bothered to train them for their own medical needs.  I'd accept this if the UK's healtcare needs had been sprung upon us in recent years, but our demographic changes have been clear for decades, and yet the country didn't bother to invest in it's training etc.  

Often poorer countries, that have made an investment in their training, and probably need them more.

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1 hour ago, maynardgravy said:

There are countries whose economic model is partly based on training and farming out clinicians in order to send tax payer's money home - Philipines spings to mind.

It's a crazy world.

Absolutely. Phillipine nurses. I guess they want to "advance themselves", and they are (usually) good Catholics. Nice people.

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8 hours ago, MrPin said:

Bagpipes should be kept in the Victorian Scottish fantasy that never was.

I saw a guy march up Cranbrook Road in Ilford a while back in full Scottish regalia playing his bagpipes. Fairly recently, in the last couple of years.

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2 hours ago, maynardgravy said:

There are countries whose economic model is partly based on training and farming out clinicians in order to send tax payer's money home - Philipines spings to mind.

It's a crazy world.

I've heard people in Ireland say that all the best Irish trained doctors go to America and Ireland gets the leftovers plus some imports.

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9 minutes ago, Rare Bear said:

I've heard people in Ireland say that all the best Irish trained doctors go to America and Ireland gets the leftovers plus some imports.

I had better not have a bad foot after St Paddy's day where I left it in a crocodile.

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10 hours ago, The XYY Man said:

Agreed Carl.

We don't want Jock mongrels like you coming down here and fucking up our beautiful English race...

 

XYY

I think splitting Scotland off from England is looking like a genuine possibility rather than a minority pipe-dream. Hope so anyway.

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Just now, Funn3r said:

I think splitting Scotland off from England is looking like a genuine possibility rather than a minority pipe-dream. Hope so anyway.

All we need is Romans and a wall.

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