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Reasonable Members of Society


Frank Hovis
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I must admit I love to say where’s my free shit but I know I’m not geting any and it’s done in jest however many

particualy on Facebook are totaly seriese about there perceived entitlement 

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Austin Allegro
20 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

These extreme conditions are very clearly showing up who is a reasonable member of society and who not.

I regard the nation state as the highest level of societal ties that start with family and friends, then go up through town, county, home nation and the UK.

I never saw the EU in this way so I always wanted out because there was no social contract or bargain. Legislation without representation is their MO. I doubt whether any more than a tiny minority see the UN in this way.

What however has begun to fester within the UK is a large population for whom there is no social bargain. The state is merely a free cashpoint and to some extent so are the people of the UK when it comes to criminal activity.

Within the reasonable people of course there is a wide range. I grudgingly accept the restrictions whereas others start shouting at their fellow citizens and one old dear on the radio this morning said she would thank God every day for the NHS. Yes, well.

Then you have the people who aren't; best exemplified visually by that clip of East Ham high street where the only reason you would know anything was amiss was the huge queue for Iceland and the people fighting at the front of it.

It can be summarised in one simple grouping: non-disabled benefits claimants.

Whether they be white, black, of no religion or any.  There's going to be lots of immigrants in there but there's also a lot of native Brits.

These are the ones for whom there is a free lunch, for whom rights cone without responsibilities, and who have been tolerated for far too long.

This present unusual state of affairs is throwing them into sharp relief.

Good points but it goes much, much deeper than that. The system of in-work benefits means almost everyone is in some way dependent on the state. The NHS, for example, now deified for all time and beyond any criticism, ever, is not only Britain's largest employer but the third largest employer in the world. Now with the emergency legislation there are people in every town and village in the land cheering on the most draconian laws ever seen, willingly obeying them and attacking anyone who interprets them more lightly.

The level of interference would be almost unthinkable to previous generations. Churches closed by order. Unmarried couples told to cohabit or stay apart*. Military police stopping civilian vehicles at random and interrogating drivers, with the power to issue fines, with no magistrate involved.

The atmosphere is reminiscent of 1939. Libertarians made similar points back then; eventually they faded away because as the war intensified nearly everyone realised the restrictions were necessary for the survival of the British people. It will be interesting to see what happens if/when Corona fades away rather than intensifies. Sadly I think we have crossed something of a Rubicon in recent days and things will not be the same again.

*this one is particularly worrying. I can't recall a time in history when the government has seen fit to advise people on their romantic affiliations. Before the Blair era, advising unmarried couples to 'live in sin' would have been unthinkable.

Edited by Austin Allegro
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I agreed with you until the closing sentence @Frank Hovis. I have yet to see any sort of societal change being proposed or even mooted by anyone in power. Once this is over, whenever that shall be, the bennies will keep rolling, government debt will be forgotten, and austerity will be cancelled (if it ever even existed). The Big Reset will come, and given the rapid pace at which the gubbermint announced FREE MONEY FOR EVERYONE (particularly the feckless), I doubt anything will change.

That England, that was wont to conquer others, Hath made a shameful conquest of itself.

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2 minutes ago, spunko said:

I agreed with you until the closing sentence @Frank Hovis. I have yet to see any sort of societal change being proposed or even mooted by anyone in power. Once this is over, whenever that shall be, the bennies will keep rolling, government debt will be forgotten, and austerity will be cancelled (if it ever even existed). The Big Reset will come, and given the rapid pace at which the gubbermint announced FREE MONEY FOR EVERYONE (particularly the feckless), I doubt anything will change.

That England, that was wont to conquer others, Hath made a shameful conquest of itself.

I think people will soon find out thats its a temporary loan forsome.

 

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24 minutes ago, MrPin said:

This is reasonable.....

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-52102906

Never have so many shopped so much. CONSUME!

 

British shoppers hoard food worth £1bn – and should be 'ashamed' 

NHS staff are facing empty supermarket shelves as panic-buying customers cause needless shortages during the pandemic

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2020/03/21/britons-should-ashamed-stockpiling-1bn-worth-food-coronavirus/


Does that add up?

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56 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

These extreme conditions are very clearly showing up who is a reasonable member of society and who not.

I regard the nation state as the highest level of societal ties that start with family and friends, then go up through town, county, home nation and the UK.

I never saw the EU in this way so I always wanted out because there was no social contract or bargain. Legislation without representation is their MO. I doubt whether any more than a tiny minority see the UN in this way.

What however has begun to fester within the UK is a large population for whom there is no social bargain. The state is merely a free cashpoint and to some extent so are the people of the UK when it comes to criminal activity.

Within the reasonable people of course there is a wide range. I grudgingly accept the restrictions whereas others start shouting at their fellow citizens and one old dear on the radio this morning said she would thank God every day for the NHS. Yes, well.

Then you have the people who aren't; best exemplified visually by that clip of East Ham high street where the only reason you would know anything was amiss was the huge queue for Iceland and the people fighting at the front of it.

It can be summarised in one simple grouping: non-disabled benefits claimants.

Whether they be white, black, of no religion or any.  There's going to be lots of immigrants in there but there's also a lot of native Brits.

These are the ones for whom there is a free lunch, for whom rights cone without responsibilities, and who have been tolerated for far too long.

This present unusual state of affairs is throwing them into sharp relief.

https://www.gazettelive.co.uk/news/teesside-news/yob-jailed-smashing-up-nhs-18012522

https://www.gazettelive.co.uk/news/teesside-news/nhs-staff-applaud-thank-you-16236323?int_source=taboola&int_medium=display&int_campaign=organic

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On the topic of supermarkets, I have just been to mine. Still no cheddar, not much fish, no pasta, no tinned legumes etc. How can it be? We are told that the "just in time" model allows for stocks to be refilled within a day or so, but this has gone on for weeks, and nobody is allowed to buy more than 2/3 items...

Obviously it's nothing to do with stock being sold too quickly, it's more a case of moving too slowly - i.e. because it doesn't exist in the supply chain. The just in time model is massively flawed and any government worth their salt would regulate this, but I doubt we'll see it.

If one thing recent events have made it abundantly clear to me that, along with the Holy NHS, the Tories give far too much undue weight to supermarkets. Why are they allowed to keep open their cafes, their florist, their meat counter, their fish counter, when the garden center, the butcher, the cafe, the fishmonger have all been forced to close? Outrageous. Invest in supermarket shares!

 

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Frank Hovis
10 minutes ago, spunko said:

Obviously it's nothing to do with stock being sold too quickly, it's more a case of moving too slowly - i.e. because it doesn't exist in the supply chain. The just in time model is massively flawed and any government worth their salt would regulate this, but I doubt we'll see it.

It may still be.

I usually buy bread flour and yeast every couple of weeks.

People, even those who have never made bread in their lives, panic bought both early on thinking they could learn and it will last longer than ready made bread 

So for three weeks there was no bread flour. When it was back I, and every other regular buyer, could finally restock to their normal level and bought three when they would usually buy one.

If it's in next time I go I will only buy one.

This is the secondary effect of the initial period of panic-buying: you get a pent up demand from regular non-panic buyers which takes a few weeks to unwind.

There is still no bread yeast in. When it comes in it will go as quickly as the first restock of bread flour.

Normal supply can't cope with people being idiots.

I know damn well that most of that panic bought bread flour and yeast will end up being thrown away.

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25 minutes ago, sarahbell said:

British shoppers hoard food worth £1bn – and should be 'ashamed' 

NHS staff are facing empty supermarket shelves as panic-buying customers cause needless shortages during the pandemic

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2020/03/21/britons-should-ashamed-stockpiling-1bn-worth-food-coronavirus/


Does that add up?

Fuck off ive been vindicated that haveing a stash is a wize move if anything my stash should be substantially larger .i was working on the assumption it would be needed for one person ie me .I’ve since realised I should have thought about covering for potentially more people and a longer period we are going to get off light compared to some country’s lockdowns .so once this is over I’m realy going to build a huge stash and board part of the loft out to house it 

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1 hour ago, Frank Hovis said:

It can be summarised in one simple grouping: non-disabled benefits claimants.

Very well summarised !

Edited by Andersen
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Austin Allegro
14 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

It may still be.

I usually buy bread flour and yeast every couple of weeks.

People, even those who have never made bread in their lives, panic bought both early on thinking they could learn and it will last longer than ready made bread 

So for three weeks there was no bread flour. When it was back I, and every other regular buyer, could finally restock to their normal level and bought three when they would usually buy one.

If it's in next time I go I will only buy one.

This is the secondary effect of the initial period of panic-buying: you get a pent up demand from regular non-panic buyers which takes a few weeks to unwind.

There is still no bread yeast in. When it comes in it will go as quickly as the first restock of bread flour.

Normal supply can't cope with people being idiots.

I know damn well that most of that panic bought bread flour and yeast will end up being thrown away.

You probably already know this but you can make your own yeast quite easily - see details online.

Alternatively, Irish soda bread can be made without yeast.

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1 hour ago, Frank Hovis said:

These extreme conditions are very clearly showing up who is a reasonable member of society and who not.

I regard the nation state as the highest level of societal ties that start with family and friends, then go up through town, county, home nation and the UK.

I never saw the EU in this way so I always wanted out because there was no social contract or bargain. Legislation without representation is their MO. I doubt whether any more than a tiny minority see the UN in this way.

What however has begun to fester within the UK is a large population for whom there is no social bargain. The state is merely a free cashpoint and to some extent so are the people of the UK when it comes to criminal activity.

Within the reasonable people of course there is a wide range. I grudgingly accept the restrictions whereas others start shouting at their fellow citizens and one old dear on the radio this morning said she would thank God every day for the NHS. Yes, well.

Then you have the people who aren't; best exemplified visually by that clip of East Ham high street where the only reason you would know anything was amiss was the huge queue for Iceland and the people fighting at the front of it.

It can be summarised in one simple grouping: non-disabled benefits claimants.

Whether they be white, black, of no religion or any.  There's going to be lots of immigrants in there but there's also a lot of native Brits.

These are the ones for whom there is a free lunch, for whom rights cone without responsibilities, and who have been tolerated for far too long.

This present unusual state of affairs is throwing them into sharp relief.

That clip was an eye-opener! What a shithole.

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19 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

It may still be.

I usually buy bread flour and yeast every couple of weeks.

People, even those who have never made bread in their lives, panic bought both early on thinking they could learn and it will last longer than ready made bread 

So for three weeks there was no bread flour. When it was back I, and every other regular buyer, could finally restock to their normal level and bought three when they would usually buy one.

If it's in next time I go I will only buy one.

This is the secondary effect of the initial period of panic-buying: you get a pent up demand from regular non-panic buyers which takes a few weeks to unwind.

There is still no bread yeast in. When it comes in it will go as quickly as the first restock of bread flour.

Normal supply can't cope with people being idiots.

I know damn well that most of that panic bought bread flour and yeast will end up being thrown away.

I’ve got my flour sealed in freezer bags I presume it doesn’t go off and I will soon be able to buy a very cheap newish breadmaker that was panic bought 

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Frank Hovis
39 minutes ago, stokiescum said:

I’ve got my flour sealed in freezer bags I presume it doesn’t go off and I will soon be able to buy a very cheap newish breadmaker that was panic bought 

It lasts for a year anyway.  New breadmakers from Aldi & Lidl are £40 / £50.

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2 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

It lasts for a year anyway.  New breadmakers from Aldi & Lidl are £40 / £50.

I want one I can put seeds in you can’t beat a selfie with bits of nuts stuck in your teeth

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2 hours ago, stokiescum said:

Quite a few mps are siting on the fence in the middle of the river on this issue Blair would have loved to be in charge dureing this chrisis

I frigging hate that man with a passion but I found myself rather alarmed when I heard him talking the other day. I couldn’t help thinking he would have done a better job than this lot right now. 

He may have been a Cnut who ruined this country beyond all recognition but he did seem to have a strong sense of leadership which is why so many of us were fooled.

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Frank Hovis
5 minutes ago, stokiescum said:

I want one I can put seeds in you can’t beat a selfie with bits of nuts stuck in your teeth

Just avoid the very basic ones; if it has ten programmes you'll be able to put seeds in it.  It beeps havlfway through to tell you to put them in; they all sink to teh bottom if you put them in straight off.

And do not do what I did with my first bread maker - take out the bread tin and wash it.  It eventually makes the cogs at the base of the tin go rusty and struggle to move the paddles.

I've never washed my current bread tin.  Pick out trapped bits of dry bread and give it a wipe with a damp cloth.

 

3 minutes ago, Battenberg said:

I frigging hate that man with a passion but I found myself rather alarmed when I heard him talking the other day. I couldn’t help thinking he would have done a better job than this lot right now. 

He may have been a Cnut who ruined this country beyond all recognition but he did seem to have a strong sense of leadership which is why so many of us were fooled.

Joking!

We'd have ended up wth an armed anti-fa army in black wearing masks ordering people off the street.  The bloke was a mad dictator.

Edited by Frank Hovis
every -> very
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7 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

It lasts for a year anyway.  New breadmakers from Aldi & Lidl are £40 / £50.

Don't buy a cheap one, spend a bit extra and get a decent one, we have a Panasonic SD2500 and it's been hammered - several uses a week for the least 6/7 years. Makes much better bread than the crappy Kenwood one we had previous to that.

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3 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

Just avoid the every basic ones; if it has ten programmes you'll be able to put seeds in it.  It beeps havlfway through to tell you to put them in; they all sink to teh bottom if you put them in straight off.

And do not do what I did with my first bread maker - take out the bread tin and wash it.  It eventually makes the cogs at the base of the tin go rusty and struggle to move the paddles.

I've never washed my current bread tin.  Pick out trapped bits of dry bread and give it a wipe with a damp cloth.

 

Joking!

We'd have ended up wth an armed anti-fa army in black wearing masks ordering people off the street.  The bloke was a mad dictator.

You’re right. I did have to have a very firm word with myself. I do wonder if I’m a bit confused at the moment. I’m not sleeping, I’m having terrible dreams when I do and I keep forgetting what day it is. Thank you for bringing me to my senses.:)

Edited by Battenberg
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Frank Hovis
Just now, Boglet said:

Don't buy a cheap one, spend a bit extra and get a decent one, we have a Panasonic SD2500 and it's been hammered - several uses a week for the least 6/7 years. Makes much better bread than the crappy Kenwood one we had previous to that.

I agree but as with all Lidl / Aldi products if you pay the extra £20 you get quality.  You don't need to pay a brand premium.

I wouldn't buy a £30 one again but my £50 one is excellent.

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