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choochoo

Hypo allergenic dogs

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Kids have been badgering for ages for a dog. Not keen, partly cause mildly allergic.

Lockdown blues mean my resolve is gradually eroding.

If I did agree, it would need to be something that wouldn't set my allergies off.

Any advice?

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3 minutes ago, choochoo said:

Kids have been badgering for ages for a dog. Not keen, partly cause mildly allergic.

Lockdown blues mean my resolve is gradually eroding.

If I did agree, it would need to be something that wouldn't set my allergies off.

Any advice?

My specialist subject.

I am allergic to every fucking animal. Cats, dogs, budgies, horses. You name it, they set me off. In a really bad going almost blind kind of way.

Except lurchers or greyhounds. They have some weird kind of thing that means almost nobody is allergic to them.

No idea why but it is true.

And, in my opinion, they are brilliant dogs.

 

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15 minutes ago, sarahbell said:

Husband allergic to cats and dogs.

Friend's jack Russell sets him off big time. Ex-f curly haired non moulting water dog also sets him off.

 

 

It has its benefits.

My sister has cats. Because of that I haven't been able to see her for years.

😁

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Just make sure that you don’t get a dog with allergies! One of my border terriers has had on and off ear infections and skin problems for years. Vet says it’s allergy of some sort. Noticed the dogs stomach getting a bit red and itching himself more. Possibly pollen? It’s cost me a fortune!

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45 minutes ago, Wight Flight said:

It has its benefits.

My sister has cats. Because of that I haven't been able to see her for years.

😁

We used to have three cats and he took an antihistamine every day.

No more cats and Def no dog.

 

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13 minutes ago, sarahbell said:

We used to have three cats and he took an antihistamine every day.

No more cats and Def no dog.

 

My mother allowed my sister to get a cat.

I had to leave home a couple of weeks later.

It was a touch annoying.

 

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Just now, Wight Flight said:

My mother allowed my sister to get a cat.

I had to leave home a couple of weeks later.

It was a touch annoying.

 

I will add I had two cats when we got together.

I miss my last cat too much still anyway to replace her.

Getting another one would feel very mean as he's much better health wise since we don't have any.

 

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1 minute ago, sarahbell said:

I will add I had two cats when we got together.

I miss my last cat too much still anyway to replace her.

Getting another one would feel very mean as he's much better health wise since we don't have any.

 

If you were my wife and you got a cat I would leave. In about 10 minutes.

You have shown your preference. Just as my mother and sister did.

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Wasn't the 'labradoodle' cross breed popular because of allegedly non-allergenic coat, something to do with the poodle side of the arrangement? I'm with @Wight Flight in favouring greyhounds and lurchers (lurchers being cross breeds will have varying coats), but it's down to personal preference and owners sometimes struggle with running dogs strong instinct to chase and need to run. Kids that desperately want dogs at the moment may not be interested in a couple of years once puberty hits and a lot of dogs will live for 15 years.

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8 hours ago, Wight Flight said:

If you were my wife and you got a cat I would leave. In about 10 minutes.

You have shown your preference. Just as my mother and sister did.

I got chickens last year which I suspect are cat replacements really. They're not in the garden so a compromise for me. 

We've blocked up the cat flap. So no more cats.a friend has a cat flap and their chickens stand outside waiting but haven't worked out how to get in. 

 

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10 hours ago, choochoo said:

Kids have been badgering for ages for a dog. Not keen, partly cause mildly allergic.

Lockdown blues mean my resolve is gradually eroding.

If I did agree, it would need to be something that wouldn't set my allergies off.

Any advice?

 

3 hours ago, Caravan Monster said:

Wasn't the 'labradoodle' cross breed popular because of allegedly non-allergenic coat, something to do with the poodle side of the arrangement? I'm with @Wight Flight in favouring greyhounds and lurchers (lurchers being cross breeds will have varying coats), but it's down to personal preference and owners sometimes struggle with running dogs strong instinct to chase and need to run. Kids that desperately want dogs at the moment may not be interested in a couple of years once puberty hits and a lot of dogs will live for 15 years.

What he said. For a family pet, a labradoodle(you could ask to see the dog and pet it a bit (without the kids there) to test the allergy) , for an otherwise great dog that has an instinct (and sometimes an ability) to murder smaller animals that you’ll need to control via strict training, a lurcher. 

To paraphrase an old RSPCA ad, a dog is not just for lockdown. 

 

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Posted (edited)

 Cocker-spaniel and poodle cross, the cockapoo, is very popular at the moment. Also claimed as hypo-allergenic, they are genuinely pretty good. I have severe allergy to cats, and normally start to get itchy and asthmatic after a few hours with a dog, but I find them barely noticeable for allergies. Very friendly to other people and non-aggressive. They don’t need a huge amount of walking either.

Edit to add: For young children a dog that is friendly towards other young children is a big advantage.

Edited by Hail the Tripod

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As a fellow sufferer I've looked at labradoodles over the past few years, and they have a number of problems. Firstly there's a lot of variance in their non-allergenic effect, so you need to get the right type within the breed. Not sure if it was Autralian that I was looking at but we were looking at £2.5k and a 12 month waiting list when we looked. What finally put me off was reading an article by the guy who originally crossed the breed, saying it was the worst thing he ever did. Reason being that once people realised how much money they could make for a poodle cross, they started chucking them together with no knowledge or care, and ended up creating genetic strains that are seriously screwed - he reckons there's masses of dogs out there that are physically any mentally fucked, which is cruel to them and shit for the owners.

My neighbour's labradoodle dropped dead of a heart attack at 5 years old. Obviously that could happen to a border collie too, but it's the only labradoodle I've ever known personally and it died suddenly.

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8 hours ago, Wight Flight said:

You have shown your preference. Just as my mother and sister did.

I don't quite know the appropriate response to this. It's clearly still deeply traumatic for you, even after all this time, but also fucking hilarious, obviously.

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OK am a bit of an expert in this area ;-)

The allergies you suffer from are NOT from the fur - they are from the oils in the fur. Therefore some people have the idea that getting a dog with shorter hair will mean less allergies. It won't.

What you need to do is find breeds that have different types of coat, that have a lot less (or none) of the oils i'm talking about.

I'm not sure about poodles (and thus labradoodles) but as those shitty little yap bags "Bichon Frise" have almost zero oils, then it sounds likely the poodles would have similar. Problem is all small dogs are shit, and poodles are arsey little wankers too. So hypoallergenic, but shit.

(I've always been of the opinion that anything smaller than a cat can't possible be a real dog).

The only other breed of dog that I found to by hypo-allergenic is the Siberian Husky. This is due to him having a 'double coat' that insulates in a different way by trapping air far more efficiently (and doesn't have these oils). It sheds like a beast in the summer (I honestly used to pull out the same amount of fur in weight to the dog himself! Looked like I had two of them!) but I had loads of friends and visitors who were normally 'allergic to fur' and none of them ever so much as sneezed with the husky.

Of course the shame is that they have such a strong prey drive, can run for decades and have no interest in pleasing you... so you can't let them off the lead or the next thing you'll get is a call from a vet 25 miles away asking if you've lost a dog

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Posted (edited)
13 minutes ago, Hail the Tripod said:

 Cocker-spaniel and poodle cross, the cockapoo, is very popular at the moment. Also claimed as hypo-allergenic, they are genuinely pretty good. I have severe allergy to cats, and normally start to get itchy and asthmatic after a few hours with a dog, but I find them barely noticeable for allergies. Very friendly to other people and non-aggressive. They don’t need a huge amount of walking either.

Edit to add: For young children a dog that is friendly towards other young children is a big advantage.

Cockapoos have a lovely temperament IME.  They're great fun and having been on several walks with one they are the first dog that I actually would consider having; I've always previously liked cats only.

The point of the poodle cross is that they don't shed leaving hair everywhere; though that does mean that they need regular trims to stop it getting long and matted.

Edited by Frank Hovis

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12 minutes ago, LC1 said:

I don't quite know the appropriate response to this. It's clearly still deeply traumatic for you, even after all this time, but also fucking hilarious, obviously.

It's not traumatic.

I just left home (at 17) and moved in to digs.

I haven't really got on with either of them since.

 

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11 hours ago, Wight Flight said:

My specialist subject.

I am allergic to every fucking animal. Cats, dogs, budgies, horses. You name it, they set me off. In a really bad going almost blind kind of way.

Except lurchers or greyhounds. They have some weird kind of thing that means almost nobody is allergic to them.

No idea why but it is true.

And, in my opinion, they are brilliant dogs.

 

BegoarrahSemaus!ThatbeGreta.MantoMantescoCarPark

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9 hours ago, Wight Flight said:

My mother allowed my sister to get a cat.

I had to leave home a couple of weeks later.

It was a touch annoying.

 

Cough.

Hessian sack.

Cough

Motorway or canal, which ever is closest.

...

Help her put the Messing Cat  posters up.

Oh some cats are like that. Its probably livng on cliffs eating rabbits.

 

 

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, sarahbell said:

I got chickens last year which I suspect are cat replacements really. They're not in the garden so a compromise for me. 

We've blocked up the cat flap. So no more cats.a friend has a cat flap and their chickens stand outside waiting but haven't worked out how to get in. 

 

@choochoo as you're new to dogs and looking for advice, let me tell you this: a chicken is not a breed of dog! xD

Chickens lay eggs.

Dogs lay turds.

Chickens have two legs.

Dogs have four.

Dogs are called Rover.

Chickens are called food.

Jeez, not even finished the first page of a new thread and someone has us already wavering off topic.:D

@sarahbell - headmaster's office now! xD

Edited by Gordie Lastchance

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11 hours ago, choochoo said:

Kids have been badgering for ages for a dog. Not keen, partly cause mildly allergic.

Lockdown blues mean my resolve is gradually eroding.

If I did agree, it would need to be something that wouldn't set my allergies off.

Any advice?

 

Minature / Toy poodle. I had one for 19 years.

The great thing about them is that they have fur and not hair so not shredding of hair. They have to be cut - you can either do it yourself with some trimmers or send it to a dog groomer 2 or 3 times a year. They don't grow their fur that rapidly. No need for any fancy old-fashioned poodle look. Just tell any groomer not to cover them in talc which some are prone to do with some dogs.

Poodles are really intelligent dogs also. I would not get a fullk-size poodle as they grow to be enormous.

 

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52 minutes ago, Southmartin said:

 

I'm not sure about poodles (and thus labradoodles) but as those shitty little yap bags "Bichon Frise" have almost zero oils, then it sounds likely the poodles would have similar. Problem is all small dogs are shit, and poodles are arsey little wankers too. So hypoallergenic, but shit.

(I've always been of the opinion that anything smaller than a cat can't possible be a real dog).

The only other breed of dog that I found to by hypo-allergenic is the Siberian Husky. This is due to him having a 'double coat' that insulates in a different way by trapping air far more efficiently ...

I think that most water dogs are good for allergies, including the Bichon Frise if you want a tiny yappy toy thing, but up to proper dogs if you actually want a dog.

Huskies would be good, other than that they're basically wolves and aren't ideal as a first dog.

I'd also add that I don't get the purebred dog thing -- dogs come for free (or a nominal exchange of cash as a gesture of 'I'm likely to look after it'.  You only have to look at the parents (or more usually, look at the bitch and have a verbal description of the stud) to see what sort of dog you're going to get.

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