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Benefits of the current lockdown


Rare Bear
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Since the council here in Redbridge have required that all the rubbish that is to be collected is properly bagged and takeaways are operating under severe restrictions, I've noticed that the streets are a helluva lot tidier.

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Thombleached

Understand this isn't in the spirit of the thread 🤐 but I'm seeing the opposite on country lanes. Roadkill piling up (bit of an exaggeration but at least 5 on my 6 mile run) and bits of flytipping here and there.

Can't say what the nearest town looks like as I've not been in a month.

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5 minutes ago, Thombleached said:

Understand this isn't in the spirit of the thread 🤐 but I'm seeing the opposite on country lanes. Roadkill piling up (bit of an exaggeration but at least 5 on my 6 mile run) and bits of flytipping here and there.

Can't say what the nearest town looks like as I've not been in a month.

What sort of road kill ?

Can it be eaten ?

Pheasant, rabbit, hare, pigeon?

 

Edited by Hopeful
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Thombleached
1 minute ago, Hopeful said:

Can it be eaten ?

Guess so, probably a bit old by now 🤮

3 badgers, couple of birds and a pheasant.

If I could guarantee they died that day I'd give it a crack though. 

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11 minutes ago, Thombleached said:

Guess so, probably a bit old by now 🤮

3 badgers, couple of birds and a pheasant.

If I could guarantee they died that day I'd give it a crack though. 

You can usually tell if they died that day.

Good signs

is it still warm and floppy

Can you see bright red blood, mouth nostrils, elswhere

is it cold but still stiff

bad signs

is it cold and floppy

Can you see maggots

 

Warm and floppy and rigor mortis or bright red blood are a good sign of freshness. Rigor mortis will set in 30 mins after death and dissipate between 24-48 hrs hours in a pheasant. Then the maggots appear.

Edited by Hopeful
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29 minutes ago, Hopeful said:

You can usually tell if they died that day.

Good signs

is it still warm and floppy

Can you see bright red blood, mouth nostrils, elswhere

is it cold but still stiff

bad signs

is it cold and floppy

Can you see maggots

 

Warm and floppy and rigor mortis or bright red blood are a good sign of freshness. Rigor mortis will set in 30 mins after death and dissipate between 24-48 hrs hours in a pheasant. Then the maggots appear.

I had some thoughts about picking up aa pheasant during my recent (essential obviously) drive but these are exactly the kind of considerations that have put me off. I may revisit the idea once food prices increase 10 times

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1 minute ago, Bear Hug said:

I had some thoughts about picking up aa pheasant during my recent (essential obviously) drive but these are exactly the kind of considerations that have put me off. I may revisit the idea once food prices increase 10 times

As long as it's not mushed you can easily tell the condition

I'd only ever pick up whole birds, glancing blowes, never anything where the carcass had split open.

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Democorruptcy
58 minutes ago, Thombleached said:

Understand this isn't in the spirit of the thread 🤐 but I'm seeing the opposite on country lanes. Roadkill piling up (bit of an exaggeration but at least 5 on my 6 mile run) and bits of flytipping here and there.

Can't say what the nearest town looks like as I've not been in a month.

They are lulled into a false sense of security because they are not being pestered by humans. The more curious are coming to see where the humans have gone, like the Great Orme goats wandering around Llandudno. We already know curiosity killed the cat.

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9 minutes ago, Hopeful said:

As long as it's not mushed you can easily tell the condition

I'd only ever pick up whole birds, glancing blowes, never anything where the carcass had split open.

Have you ever eaten Badger* @Hopeful ? 

Was thinking of giving it a go one day. 

I’ve tried most other ‘wild meat’. everything from a squirrel casserole to a baked hedgehog* (A traditional Gypsy favourite). 

(* Not killed but found recently deceased?). 

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2 minutes ago, Vendetta said:

Have you ever eaten Badger* @Hopeful ? 

Was thinking of giving it a go one day. 

I’ve tried most other ‘wild meat’. everything from a squirrel casserole to a baked hedgehog* (A traditional Gypsy favourite). 

(* Not killed but found recently deceased?). 

never eaten badger, squirell or hedgehog (an elderly (70s) lady friend did eat a squirrel last week, to my surprise)

My list, Pheasant, hare, pigeon, rabbit, deer in that order of abundance

Edited by Hopeful
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I was taught by my mother (who was a sister in A&E having previously been a matron) never to touch a dead animal as you could never be sure that it wasn't carrying any diseases.  I remember this lesson clearly. When I was about 10 years old, I picked up a dead bird in the garden.  When I told her, she called me in to the house.  I immediately had my outer clothes removed and put in the washing machine, my hands scrubbed with a nail brush and my face washed, and I was then sent to take a shower.

My current understanding of how the pandemic started was that someone in China ate a wild animal.  If this is how the pandemic started, is it possible that someone in the UK eating a dead animal found by the road could start another pandemic?  If not, please could someone explain why?

Pardon my ignorance - and I know I am completely ignorant in this instance - but I am genuinely concerned by this thought.

 

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ashestoashes
11 minutes ago, Lipid said:

I was taught by my mother (who was a sister in A&E having previously been a matron) never to touch a dead animal as you could never be sure that it wasn't carrying any diseases.  I remember this lesson clearly. When I was about 10 years old, I picked up a dead bird in the garden.  When I told her, she called me in to the house.  I immediately had my outer clothes removed and put in the washing machine, my hands scrubbed with a nail brush and my face washed, and I was then sent to take a shower.

My current understanding of how the pandemic started was that someone in China ate a wild animal.  If this is how the pandemic started, is it possible that someone in the UK eating a dead animal found by the road could start another pandemic?  If not, please could someone explain why?

Pardon my ignorance - and I know I am completely ignorant in this instance - but I am genuinely concerned by this thought.

 

thought it was that one of the scientists at wuhan germ warfare lab had been accidently sprayed with bat's blood/urine

think your mother was over reacting - have you not seen children of the elite getting blooded at fox hunts 

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16 minutes ago, Lipid said:

I was taught by my mother (who was a sister in A&E having previously been a matron) never to touch a dead animal as you could never be sure that it wasn't carrying any diseases.  I remember this lesson clearly. When I was about 10 years old, I picked up a dead bird in the garden.  When I told her, she called me in to the house.  I immediately had my outer clothes removed and put in the washing machine, my hands scrubbed with a nail brush and my face washed, and I was then sent to take a shower.

My current understanding of how the pandemic started was that someone in China ate a wild animal.  If this is how the pandemic started, is it possible that someone in the UK eating a dead animal found by the road could start another pandemic?  If not, please could someone explain why?

Pardon my ignorance - and I know I am completely ignorant in this instance - but I am genuinely concerned by this thought.

 

New zoonoses (viral transmission from animals to humans) generally occur when people decide to eat animals that live deep in the jungle where we don't normally interact with them. The worry with birds is some of them are migratory so can pick things up thousands of miles away and bring it here. It would be strange for pheasants to be infected with something we could catch but not pigeons or farmyard birds so if an avian virus was going to make the jump to humans it would do it whether or not we eat roadkill pheasant. The good news is that's it's really hard to catch avian viruses - cases of bird flu have been pretty much limited to poultry farmers.

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17 minutes ago, Lipid said:

I was taught by my mother (who was a sister in A&E having previously been a matron) never to touch a dead animal as you could never be sure that it wasn't carrying any diseases.  I remember this lesson clearly. When I was about 10 years old, I picked up a dead bird in the garden.  When I told her, she called me in to the house.  I immediately had my outer clothes removed and put in the washing machine, my hands scrubbed with a nail brush and my face washed, and I was then sent to take a shower.

My current understanding of how the pandemic started was that someone in China ate a wild animal.  If this is how the pandemic started, is it possible that someone in the UK eating a dead animal found by the road could start another pandemic?  If not, please could someone explain why?

Pardon my ignorance - and I know I am completely ignorant in this instance - but I am genuinely concerned by this thought.

 

No problems eating wild animals, as long as you follow basic common sense preparations. 

The problem in China is keeping all manner of animals alive and dead in close proximity to each other in densely populated human areas and in suspect hygiene conditions. 

 

Having said that, the more I look into what's happening the more I'm comming round to @ccc thinking that this situation doesn't exist. The situation being COViD 19 catastrophe.*

There's a man made catastrophe in the making right now caused by lockdown. And for whatever purpose we'll see eventually. 

*not saying this corona virus doesn't exist or people aren't dieing from it. I'm just not see vast amounts of bodies that is statistically different from noise

 

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1 minute ago, Poseidon said:

I'm just not see vast amounts of bodies that is statistically different from noise

Of course you aren't - the stats are more than two weeks old. The 700 SARS2 deaths we'd had to that point were never going to make an impact.

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1 minute ago, ashestoashes said:

thought it was that one of the scientists at wuhan germ warfare lab had been accidently sprayed with bat's blood/urine

think your mother was over reacting - have you not seen children of the elite getting blooded at fox hunts 

I don't know.  Infections were unheard of on her wards though.  Also, I think I have never had antibiotics despite having loads of cuts as she taught me to always make sure a would is clean before dressing it.

It prevents this sort of thing from happening:

https://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/woman-who-woke-find-leg-13845073

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2 minutes ago, Poseidon said:

No problems eating wild animals, as long as you follow basic common sense preparations. 

The problem in China is keeping all manner of animals alive and dead in close proximity to each other in densely populated human areas and in suspect hygiene conditions. 

 

Having said that, the more I look into what's happening the more I'm comming round to @ccc thinking that this situation doesn't exist. The situation being COViD 19 catastrophe.*

There's a man made catastrophe in the making right now caused by lockdown. And for whatever purpose we'll see eventually. 

*not saying this corona virus doesn't exist or people aren't dieing from it. I'm just not see vast amounts of bodies that is statistically different from noise

 

My view on this thing has gone full circle. 

I was the one telling all my pals to stock up and how bad it was going to be etc a few months back. 

Now having looked at it daily I think it's much ado about not very much. 

And being a fairly stubborn cunt I don't often admit if I think I was wrong. But I fully do for this thing. 

Time will tell but so far the body count simply doesn't stack up. Not even close. 

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3 hours ago, Hopeful said:

You can usually tell if they died that day.

Good signs

is it still warm and floppy

Can you see bright red blood, mouth nostrils, elswhere

is it cold but still stiff

bad signs

is it cold and floppy

Can you see maggots

 

Warm and floppy and rigor mortis or bright red blood are a good sign of freshness. Rigor mortis will set in 30 mins after death and dissipate between 24-48 hrs hours in a pheasant. Then the maggots appear.

There were a couple of dead badgers on my walk to work last year. It was interesting to see the decomposition over time in a morbid way.

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5 minutes ago, ccc said:

Time will tell but so far the body count simply doesn't stack up. Not even close. 

Because we've only got all cause stats from before we went full Italy. I wonder what the new straw grasping will be once this past week's 6k deaths feed through into the stats.

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3 hours ago, Hopeful said:

never eaten badger, squirell or hedgehog (an elderly (70s) lady friend did eat a squirrel last week, to my surprise)

My list, Pheasant, hare, pigeon, rabbit, deer in that order of abundance

My rule for eating dead animals is simple, don't eat anything that would eat you if the roles were reversed.

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5 minutes ago, This Time said:

Because we've only got all cause stats from before we went full Italy. I wonder what the new straw grasping will be once this past week's 6k deaths feed through into the stats.

We shall see when we get the numbers in. Anything other than a huge overall increase means this reaction has been way over the top. 

I find it difficult to see how anyone could even argue against this point. 

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3 hours ago, Hopeful said:

never eaten badger, squirell or hedgehog (an elderly (70s) lady friend did eat a squirrel last week, to my surprise)

My list, Pheasant, hare, pigeon, rabbit, deer in that order of abundance

You could try and supplement the badger with some bat, ideally an adult horseshoe bat. I find that roasting the whole badger with the live bat inside the badger, like those multi-roast birds, works best. The various strong viruses from the bat are mellowed by the tuberculosis in the badger. I think the double-roast with live bat it is an old Chinese cooking tip but they use pangolin instead of badger, then finish off with songbird canapés … oh and a few vegetables to make sure you get your five a day.

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4 hours ago, Thombleached said:

Understand this isn't in the spirit of the thread 🤐 but I'm seeing the opposite on country lanes. Roadkill piling up (bit of an exaggeration but at least 5 on my 6 mile run) and bits of flytipping here and there.

Can't say what the nearest town looks like as I've not been in a month.

It's not any different here either I've been doing my fortnightly litter picking as normal. Mostly beer cans now rather than McDonald's. 

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Thombleached
1 minute ago, spunko said:

It's not any different here either I've been doing my fortnightly litter picking as normal. Mostly beer cans now rather than McDonald's. 

Ditto. all cheap lager cans and RTD cans (gin and slim in a can jobbies). Seems alkies are taking their hour walk just like the rest of us.

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