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Thombleached

Talk me into/out of this

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I live in a little village by a slow moving part of the river Trent.

On a little walk with my middle daughter we started talking about kayaking. She's up for it.....so:

1) Does this count as my governbankment sanctioned outdoors time

2) Does this look any good? Clicky Link

3) Suggestions for lifevests?

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1) Not sure but might be pushing your luck.

2) I have that kayak and think it's great, especially considering the price.

3) I got some cheap basic jackets from Decathlon which do the job.

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Posted (edited)
13 minutes ago, Thombleached said:

3) Suggestions for lifevests?

Lifevests are for kayaking in the sea.

On rivers and canals, use a simpler, cheaper buoyancy aid, that does not need inflating.   It's a sleeveless jacket padded with closed cell foam.

I regret selling my kayak.

Quote

2) Does this look any good? Clicky Link

I'd call that a canoe, not a kayak.

Edited by Happy Renting

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Posted (edited)
30 minutes ago, Thombleached said:

I live in a little village by a slow moving part of the river Trent.

On a little walk with my middle daughter we started talking about kayaking. She's up for it.....so:

1) Does this count as my governbankment sanctioned outdoors time

2) Does this look any good? Clicky Link

3) Suggestions for lifevests?

 

1) Do it, rowing or paddling is exercise

2) I can't comment on that kayak, I do it but not in a serious enough manner to recommend equipment

3) British Canoeing recommends you don't go on the waterways (see quote beloe), which for me is good enough reason to go on the waterways.

If we don't abide by the law, and the law doesn't prohibit kayaking as a form of exercise, we will continue to allow people to interpret the law as they stupidly, see fit

 

Quote

With regards to paddlesport activity, British Canoeing has issued the following guidance:

In light of the government’s Stay at Home measures and following guidance issued by the Environment Agency and Canal & River Trust, which impacts the usage of waterways, British Canoeing strongly recommends that all paddlesport activity should cease on rivers, waterways and coastal areas until further notice.

This is in line with government advice requiring people to stay at home, except for very limited purposes, avoiding social gatherings and all non-essential travel.

 

That recommendation is clearly, bollocks

 

I am not an ardent canoeist, but I believe we should do what we are allowed to do legally (and even do it illegally if the law is bollocks) and live our life as fully as possible.

Edited by Hopeful

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Posted (edited)

1 ,Plod will be waiting ,if you are up for the argument do it

2,Buy a proper second hand one 

Personally i would wait until this is over then use a hire company/organised day if it`s your first time   

I have used these and can recommend them , they cater for just about everything and everyone from a day to three day trips 

http://www.wyecanoes.com/activities/river-wye-canoe-trips/

Edited by Long time lurking

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Huge moans about it, and surfing, down here by the RNLI because in the event of somebody getting into difficulty they woudl have to call out for a rescue and not be able to social distace (I ask you!).

Kayakers ignore RNLI warning to stay out of the water

The picture, which shows two people in separate kayaks, was taken by Tamerton Lake, Plymouth

https://www.plymouthherald.co.uk/news/plymouth-news/kayakers-ignore-rnli-warning-stay-4039527

 

I would (and have) paid the extra for a solid kayak.  I have tried two inflatables, not my own, and they had big downsides:

Lidl kayak - great price but you tend to "sink" in it so the sides start coming up to your armpit making it very hard to paddle.  Also high sides mean you are steered by the wind.

More expensive inflatable - tough outer and separate bladders - you don't get the sinking but you still have the high sides which means the wind catches you.  I tried this one at Mounts Bay and was practically paddling sideways.

You are though talking £300 for a solid.

 

If you are looking for a bit of warm weather fun and don't want to take it to sea then that's going to be fine for a few years until you decide whether you want to be more adventurous.

 

Lifevests - I bought one for £10 from a rental place at the end of season.  It is a good idea to try them on and make sure that your arms have free movement.

I would get a drybag as well for keys etc. that you can hang around your neck, again a tenner.

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Rivers are tricky..   you really want to start in a swimming pool or lake to get the feel for it.

The first time I went out on a river I was swimming within 5 minutes  (the current will just grab and roll you unexpectedly).    Admittedly we were in play boats,  but even in the canoe it's more of a risk.

River kayaking is mostly about knowing the river..  what are the dangers,  where are they,  where will you get in/out.     There's also the legal aspect..  there tend to be seasons and rivers you can/can't paddle in.

Kayaking's great and I would definitely recommend doing it..  but I'm not sure that's the best way to start..   if you have a bad experience it might put her off for life.

If you don't want to join a club I'd suggest starting on a beach somewhere sheltered..  you can paddle out and look at the rocks etc without the risk of getting swept away.

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Posted (edited)
15 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

Huge moans about it, and surfing, down here by the RNLI because in the event of somebody getting into difficulty they woudl have to call out for a rescue and not be able to social distace (I ask you!).

Kayakers ignore RNLI warning to stay out of the water

The picture, which shows two people in separate kayaks, was taken by Tamerton Lake, Plymouth

https://www.plymouthherald.co.uk/news/plymouth-news/kayakers-ignore-rnli-warning-stay-4039527

 

I would (and have) paid the extra for a solid kayak.  I have tried two inflatables, not my own, and they had big downsides:

Lidl kayak - great price but you tend to "sink" in it so the sides start coming up to your armpit making it very hard to paddle.  Also high sides mean you are steered by the wind.

More expensive inflatable - tough outer and separate bladders - you don't get the sinking but you still have the high sides which means the wind catches you.  I tried this one at Mounts Bay and was practically paddling sideways.

You are though talking £300 for a solid.

 

If you are looking for a bit of warm weather fun and don't want to take it to sea then that's going to be fine for a few years until you decide whether you want to be more adventurous.

 

Lifevests - I bought one for £10 from a rental place at the end of season.  It is a good idea to try them on and make sure that your arms have free movement.

I would get a drybag as well for keys etc. that you can hang around your neck, again a tenner.

Not having a pop at you Frank

But again, this is just another example of people interpreting the law as they wish

You cannot argue that kayaking is not a form of exercise, and I bet if the person was disabled such that kayaking was the only form of exercise they could take then Political Correctness would suddenly trump every consideration.

The RNLI is a charity, it has no authority to tell people what to do or how the law should be applied

Unfortunately, too many people, plod included, probably see the RNLI as an authority.

Edited by Hopeful

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Posted (edited)
4 minutes ago, Libspero said:

Rivers are tricky..   you really want to start in a swimming pool or lake to get the feel for it.

The first time I went out on a river I was swimming within 5 minutes  (the current will just grab and roll you unexpectedly).    Admittedly we were in play boats,  but even in the canoe it's more of a risk.

River kayaking is mostly about knowing the river..  what are the dangers,  where are they,  where will you get in/out.     There's also the legal aspect..  there tend to be seasons and rivers you can/can't paddle in.

Kayaking's great and I would definitely recommend doing it..  but I'm not sure that's the best way to start..   if you have a bad experience it might put her off for life.

If you don't want to join a club I'd suggest starting on a beach somewhere sheltered..  you can paddle out and look at the rocks etc without the risk of getting swept away.

 

I really am assuming that @Thombleached has some common sense and won't take an inflatable kayak into white water but might take it on a canal or a lake when the air is still, or an estuary having considered the tide.

In the absence of common sense, we have Darwin Awards

Edited by Hopeful

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3 minutes ago, Hopeful said:

 

I really am assuming that @Thombleached has some common sense and won't take an inflatable kayak into white water but might take it on a canal or a lake when the air is still, or an estuary having considered the tide.

In the absence of common sense, we have Darwin Awards

This particular part of the trent is more a wide canal - I've kayaked down it plenty of times in the past with a friend, I wouldn't say it's perfectly still, but even a child on their own would be able to move against the current (not that I'm suggesting middle daughter goes on her own...).

Think for the money I may as well get it and take it out a few times to see how to holds up, maybe stick a few bags of topsoil in it to see what it's like for the weight of two an all.

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4 minutes ago, Hopeful said:

 

I really am assuming that @Thombleached has some common sense and won't take an inflatable kayak into white water but might take it on a canal or a lake when the air is still, or an estuary having considered the tide.

In the absence of common sense, we have Darwin Awards

Well he did say a slow moving stretch of the river.

If I fancied it I would have a go; as others have said, it’s exercise and you are unlikely to come within 2 m of anyone else. Also we need to resist all these who seem to delight in making up their own interpretations of guidelines,

My only caution would be that if and when you go into the water, it will be shockingly, possibly incapacitatingly cold, so I would think about wetsuits as well.

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2 minutes ago, Thombleached said:

This particular part of the trent is more a wide canal - I've kayaked down it plenty of times in the past with a friend, I wouldn't say it's perfectly still, but even a child on their own would be able to move against the current (not that I'm suggesting middle daughter goes on her own...).

Think for the money I may as well get it and take it out a few times to see how to holds up, maybe stick a few bags of topsoil in it to see what it's like for the weight of two an all.

 

I'm happy with the law

It is easy to interpret.

I'm doing loads of stuff within the law. I'm sure much of it would get me spoken to by the plod if they came across me, and probably fined when I carried on regardless.

I'd welcome a day in court.

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2 minutes ago, Thombleached said:

This particular part of the trent is more a wide canal - I've kayaked down it plenty of times in the past with a friend, I wouldn't say it's perfectly still, but even a child on their own would be able to move against the current (not that I'm suggesting middle daughter goes on her own...).

Think for the money I may as well get it and take it out a few times to see how to holds up, maybe stick a few bags of topsoil in it to see what it's like for the weight of two an all.

The kayak you linked to is quite stable especially with the skeg in.  From memory there are a few reviews on YouTube which might be worth watching.  Buy one you won't regret it.

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Another thing to wear is a helmet, particularly in a kayak that you have to get out of when it capsizes. There's all sorts of rocks and junk on the bottom of rivers.

BTW capsizing and *Eskimo rolling is all part of the fun of kayaking.

 

 

* I expect it is now called First Nation Traditional Inuit Craft inversion and is regarded as cultural appropriation.

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2 minutes ago, Happy Renting said:

Another thing to wear is a helmet, particularly in a kayak that you have to get out of when it capsizes. There's all sorts of rocks and junk on the bottom of rivers.

BTW capsizing and *Eskimo rolling is all part of the fun of kayaking.

 

 

* I expect it is now called First Nation Traditional Inuit Craft inversion and is regarded as cultural appropriation.

I think you need to look at the link in the OP :D

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I used to go kayaking on Sydney harbour and every now and then would get proper freaked out by a big, silent, grey shape sliding deep underneath me...the water was too clear for my peace of mind.

 

brrr - just gave myself the shivers

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1 minute ago, Happy Renting said:

I've already pointed out that it is a canoe, not a kayak.

I only understand boats with a Ward Room full of gin.

1 minute ago, wherebee said:

I used to go kayaking on Sydney harbour and every now and then would get proper freaked out by a big, silent, grey shape sliding deep underneath me...the water was too clear for my peace of mind.

 

brrr - just gave myself the shivers

It was a New Zealand submarine visiting its mating ground.

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Posted (edited)
11 minutes ago, Happy Renting said:

Another thing to wear is a helmet, particularly in a kayak that you have to get out of when it capsizes. There's all sorts of rocks and junk on the bottom of rivers.

BTW capsizing and *Eskimo rolling is all part of the fun of kayaking.

 

 

* I expect it is now called First Nation Traditional Inuit Craft inversion and is regarded as cultural appropriation.

 

I think a helmet is a bit OTT - it's very liberating to not be all safety'd up to the nines. The only equipment I'd put on the child would be a life vest.

Although falling out is not impossible, it should be very unlikely and with that kayak @Thombleached will never end up upside down, and there is minimal chance of your head going more than a few inches under water if at all.

The OP is just planning a paddle.

My No 1 sport is horse riding, Always wear a hat in this country, never abroad and ironically, I usually ride much faster abroad because of the space. The first few minutes you feel a bit vulnerable, and then you realise how much better it is to have the wind in the remains of your hair given the probability of an accident.

Edited by Hopeful

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Everyone knows that under normal circumstances if you are out cycling, motorbiking or kayaking then you are often in an out of hospital. I see MAMILs all the time getting rushed to A&E.
I'm joking of course, the heightened risk stuff is nonsense IMO. And in any case, the ambulance took 3-4 hours to turn up before all this Covid business started anyway.

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