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sarahbell

Makes sense?

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If the people who can "afford to earn low wages" live in Poland, then take the jobs that require low wages over there?

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/business/analysis-and-features/uk-farmers-poland-farms-business-brexit-leave-eu-eastern-europe-union-migrant-workers-a7860456.html#gallery



This year, Chambers found it harder to recruit workers at the start of the season in June. Many workers hesitated about coming to Britain after the fall in the value of the pound since the vote for Brexit in the June 2016 referendum..

Nothing to do with the stopping of housing benefit to new arrivals? https://www.gov.uk/government/news/new-rules-to-stop-migrants-claiming-housing-benefit

Or does it if they're employed? 
The Housing Benefit changes do not affect UK and Irish Republic nationals, or EEA migrants genuinely self-employed or in a job. EEA nationals who have been working in the UK, and are subsequently made redundant and claim JSA, will not be affected by this measure.

Edited by sarahbell

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11 minutes ago, sarahbell said:

"For every job, we used to have 10 applicants. Now, we've had three," he said.

Never a case of outright greed and wanting their cake and eating it of course.

Likely they all want far more than 66% of all UK workers unemployed (the 3 applicants per job) and say nearer 90% unemployed (the 10 applicants per job) before they'd be happy. 

Edited by twocents

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Quote

 

For 70 years, Tim Chambers’ family has harvested fruit in south-east England, but after Britain’s vote last year to leave the European Union he expanded into Poland and is ready to sell some of his land if a shortage of migrant workers worsens.

His firm, WB Chambers & Son, has relied heavily on seasonal staff from Eastern Europe for the past two decades as it focused on growing raspberries and blackberries that require laborious harvesting by hand.

...

If the shortage in migrant labour gets worse and pushes up his costs, he is prepared to shift more of his business to Poland and might even sell some of his family’s land in England, he said

 

They should up sticks and farm in a cheaper country and the UK could import the product  Then the UK wouldn't need to import so many workers from those same overseas countries with all the benefits and tax credits,  Win win and probably cheaper all round - and a reduction in overcrowding and congestion along with a bit towards house price reductions and less cost of infrastructure, quadruple win for the country as a whole.

Just do it.

Join the bankers - are they still here.

Edited by twocents

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1 hour ago, sarahbell said:

If the people who can "afford to earn low wages" live in Poland, then take the jobs that require low wages over there?

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/business/analysis-and-features/uk-farmers-poland-farms-business-brexit-leave-eu-eastern-europe-union-migrant-workers-a7860456.html#gallery



This year, Chambers found it harder to recruit workers at the start of the season in June. Many workers hesitated about coming to Britain after the fall in the value of the pound since the vote for Brexit in the June 2016 referendum..

Nothing to do with the stopping of housing benefit to new arrivals? https://www.gov.uk/government/news/new-rules-to-stop-migrants-claiming-housing-benefit

Or does it if they're employed? 
The Housing Benefit changes do not affect UK and Irish Republic nationals, or EEA migrants genuinely self-employed or in a job. EEA nationals who have been working in the UK, and are subsequently made redundant and claim JSA, will not be affected by this measure.

Funny how a paper that normally has such a "progressive" editorial line can flip to crying over the plight of hereditary landowners wanting a workforce at below subsistence wages. Almost like they have no coherent principles at all.

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5 minutes ago, Happy Renting said:

I think that moving agricultural jobs to Poland would involve moving large amounts of agricultural land to Poland.

. Of the 18,727,000 hectares of agricultural land (about 60 percent of Poland's total area), 14,413,000 hectares were used for crop cultivation, 265,000 for orchards, and about 4,048,500 for meadows and pastures in 1989. In most areas, soil and climatic conditions favored a mixed type of farming.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Agriculture_in_Poland

 

By 1992 nearly all the 3,000 remaining state farms had substantial unpaid bank loans and other liabilities. For this reason, and because the government had not devised usable privatization plans at that point, the Farm Ownership Agency of the State Treasury was authorized to take over all the state farms in 1992. The agency was authorized to lease state farm lands to either Polish or foreign renters, as a temporary measure to ensure continued productivity.

http://www.politico.eu/article/poland-raises-fences-to-block-farmland-sales/

 

Poland raises fences to block farmland sales

New land law makes it almost impossible for foreigners to buy Polish farms. But it’s difficult for Poles, too.

 

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