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Excessive dog barking?


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We have had our neighbour have a paddy about the dog barking.

Yes the dog barks but never for more than twenty seconds before hes brought in or distracted. 

It's mainly in reponse to other dogs, postman or the other neighbour's kids winding him up over the fence.

He never barks at night or left outside barking but he is an over exited greeter and walking him is embarrassing at times.

He is a rescue and we got him over a year old and training is nigh on impossible, he has next to no recall and has no interest in treats.

Other than this he is an absolute joy, totally trusted with the kid and a gteat dog.

Any ideas as to what can be done, one to alleviate the situation?

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No, he's a dog, he can't fathom the peddles.

Seems that just yelling QUIET! should do the trick, as dog owners seem to think dogs speak English. Seriously though good on you for trying to sort it, wish more dog owners realised not everyone

I agreed to look after a neighbour's Jack Russell for a couple of weeks while she made her first visit to east Germany since escaping (this was a while ago). The little cunt was a right PITA, running

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Posted (edited)
7 minutes ago, GBDamo said:

We have had our neighbour have a paddy about the dog barking.

Yes the dog barks but never for more than twenty seconds before hes brought in or distracted. 

It's mainly in reponse to other dogs, postman or the other neighbour's kids winding him up over the fence.

He never barks at night or left outside barking but he is an over exited greeter and walking him is embarrassing at times.

He is a rescue and we got him over a year old and training is nigh on impossible, he has next to no recall and has no interest in treats.

Other than this he is an absolute joy, totally trusted with the kid and a gteat dog.

Any ideas as to what can be done, one to alleviate the situation?

try to teach to dog to respond to a stimulus in a way other than to bark

For example if the postman comes to the door teach the dog to run to you. Or, if that's not practical because nobody will be home most times, teach the dog to do something else such as to put a toy in his bed.

 

Edited by Hopeful
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7 minutes ago, Libspero said:

Maybe keep him in the back of the house / back garden if distractions at the front are setting him off ?

Perhaps throw a shoe at him every time he starts barking  :D

 

That's pretty much what we do and he's by no means bad or consistent. 

I think there is an element of cabin fever involved but it would be nice to be seen to be doing something.

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Last resort a bark collar.

 

But barking is natural for a dog and as long as he isn't barking for hours at a time they are being a bit precious?

 

We also have 2 young rescue dogs. (They bark but neighbours are at a distance and haven't complained yet!)

One of ours (younger one) will do anything for food. But the other one (a small hunting hound) would rather carry on doing whatever she is doing (wrong) - isn't that interested in food most of the time. So I do understand that this makes training a lot harder.

But I reckon you can still train him to bark less - it'll just be a huge (unnecessary) effort for you!

Edited by whocares
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Posted (edited)
17 minutes ago, GBDamo said:

That's pretty much what we do and he's by no means bad or consistent. 

I think there is an element of cabin fever involved but it would be nice to be seen to be doing something.

A phrase that I've used with a great variety of animals, and that they all seem to understand, is

"What the bloody hell do you think you're doing"

Said firmly in the right tone and as a statment rather than a question, it can be very effective

It works with the GF too.

Don't want to blow my trumpet but a friend has a very, very barky dog when she has visitors, her solution is to give it treats to stop it barking FFS. It is a procession of treats into the dog's mouth.

If I visit I just have to look at the dog when it starts barking for her attention and say 'WTBHDYTYD" and point to the carpet by my feet and the dog shuts up and lays at my feet silent, if it stirs to bark I just point at the carpet and the dog lays back down.

"How do you do that?" the owner says.

 

Edited by Hopeful
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23 minutes ago, GBDamo said:

We have had our neighbour have a paddy about the dog barking.

Yes the dog barks but never for more than twenty seconds before hes brought in or distracted. 

It's mainly in reponse to other dogs, postman or the other neighbour's kids winding him up over the fence.

He never barks at night or left outside barking but he is an over exited greeter and walking him is embarrassing at times.

He is a rescue and we got him over a year old and training is nigh on impossible, he has next to no recall and has no interest in treats.

Other than this he is an absolute joy, totally trusted with the kid and a gteat dog.

Any ideas as to what can be done, one to alleviate the situation?

Are you getting out with him everyday. Exercise will help take the edge off. I have a barker, my little bitch has been a pita this last fortnight but we’re always quick to stop her. I’m very aware of other people however we do have a number of dogs on our row so it can be anY of them that starts it off. 
 

A few weeks back, untiL the clocks changed, next door had geese and every time my dogs went out the back they’d all make a racket. The dogs, the geese, it was bloody awful. Thankfully the geese have moved for the summer.

 

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29 minutes ago, GBDamo said:

Yes the dog barks but never for more than twenty seconds before hes brought in or distracted. 

Sounds within the bounds of reason and I don't particularly like dogs (or dog owners to be more specific - they nearly always overrate their little darlings).

I once had a neighbour who's dog barked for hours on end. Mind you, i don't suppose listening to an hour's worth of scales is on anyone's wish list so fair's fair.

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2 minutes ago, whocares said:

Last resort a bark collar.

 

But barking is natural for a dog and as long as he isn't barking for hours at a time they are being a bit precious?

 

We also have 2 young rescue dogs. (They bark but neighbours are at a distance and haven't complained yet!)

One of ours (younger one) will do anything for food. But the other one (a small hunting hound) would rather carry on doing with whatever she is doing (wrong) - isn't that interested in food most of the time. So I do understand that this makes training a lot harder.

But I reckon you can still train him to bark less - it'll just be a huge (unnecessary) effort for you!

Ours is a cross beagle/pointer.

I think they're being a bit OTT as you'll not hear a peep from him for 14 hours but he annoys me at times so would be nice to settle him down a bit.

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3 minutes ago, GBDamo said:

Ours is a cross beagle/pointer.

I think they're being a bit OTT as you'll not hear a peep from him for 14 hours but he annoys me at times so would be nice to settle him down a bit.

Needs a hell of a lot of exercise probably.

Beagles can run all day, Pointers can work all day too.

Juts needs to be too tired to want to get up and bark

Edited by Hopeful
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6 minutes ago, Hopeful said:

Needs a hell of a lot of exercise probably.

Beagles can run all day, Pointers can work all day too.

Yes, and he don't get enough. The missus takes him out running and it doesnt even take the edge off him, she's bolloxed but he just ready for more.

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4 minutes ago, GBDamo said:

Yes, and he don't get enough. The missus takes him out running and it doesnt even take the edge off him, she's bolloxed but he just ready for more.

 

The other way to reduce energy is to put less fuel in

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47 minutes ago, GBDamo said:

he is an over exited greeter and walking him is embarrassing at times.

Our dog is the same when he sees another dog out and about. Over excited and just wants to meet / play.

The only thing I have found, which half works, is to stay completely calm. Keep your grip on the lead as loose as you can (not easy when you have a hound pulling towards the other dog). Don't shout or talk to him. Keep your pace exactly the same.

Alternatively, you can stop and get in front of him to block his view of the other dog, until he stops barking. And repeat to infinity, until he learns not to. This is a ballache though

 

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Depends on why the dog is barking, things like fear, aggression, excitement. The solution will be in him learning to find greater peace or focus in doing something other than barking, or getting away from the source of fear (physical or perceived) to a place of safety. It sounds like he may also need to increase his bond with the family by doing stuff that brings his focus to the handler, which going on the breeding is most likely going to involve a lot of finding by scent and retrieving. Getting your head around what trainers mean by vague sounding terms like 'grounding energy' helps. Kevin Behan is worth a read, but it's quite hard work.

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2 minutes ago, Caravan Monster said:

Depends on why the dog is barking, things like fear, aggression, excitement. The solution will be in him learning to find greater peace or focus in doing something other than barking, or getting away from the source of fear (physical or perceived) to a place of safety. It sounds like he may also need to increase his bond with the family by doing stuff that brings his focus to the handler, which going on the breeding is most likely going to involve a lot of finding by scent and retrieving. Getting your head around what trainers mean by vague sounding terms like 'grounding energy' helps. Kevin Behan is worth a read, but it's quite hard work.

He's a frustrated greeter and we have not found anything he is more interested in than meeting people and dogs.

Don't want to go down the deterrent collar route as I believe they introduce anxieties where there was none.

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