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Pure unadulterated Cultural Marxism


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16 minutes ago, maynardgravy said:

I also explained that we will be creating a range of new leadership and development opportunities for our BAME people, including creating new shadow management roles across a range of professions which will support our aspiring BAME managers to prepare for substantive roles when they are advertised.

 

bit racist mate.

 

Edited by snaga
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18 minutes ago, maynardgravy said:

Racial inequality has long roots in our history and society. Uprooting it will not happen overnight. But by truly listening to our BAME communities, asking ourselves the hard questions, and making concrete changes in the way we work, we can make a difference.

Damn, and I was going to pick the missus up in black face tonight.

What fucking changes? GRRRRRR.

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3 minutes ago, One percent said:

Two point. Has the chief exec got nothing better to do, such as save lives and stop the waste within the NHS. Second, if only 492 came across, they must be breeding like fucking rabbits.   o.O

You get that many floating over on a weekend from France.

Lazy black fuckers.

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2 minutes ago, maynardgravy said:

He is a prime example of a useful idiot who's climbed the arse-licking ladder of PC and once at the top told younger whitey to fuck off. The worst sort of sheister. 

Oh so a male?  Next you will be telling me he is middle age and horrendously white.  xD

funny how these people don’t see skin colour when they look in the mirror. 

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26 minutes ago, maynardgravy said:

Brace yourselves guys and gals, it's coming.

The missus sent me this from her NHS Trust Chief Exec. Sit down with a large brandy:

 

Dear colleagues,
 
Today is Windrush Day.

It marks the anniversary of the arrival of 492 workers from Jamaica, Trinidad, Tobago and other islands on the ship MV Empire Windrush. Many of them came to join the fledgling NHS, and dedicated their lives to caring for its patients.

On Windrush Day, we recognise the immense contribution of the generation of people who came to Britain at that time to offer their skills, hard work and generosity of spirit. Their diverse cultures have become a vital part of the rich tapestry of British life. Many of you may be their children or grandchildren.
This is an important day for us to reflect on our responsibilities towards the Windrush generation, their descendants, and our wider Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) communities.

Across the country, Covid-19 has laid bare the structural inequalities in our wider society. These inequalities will have already been starkly apparent to many in our BAME communities, for whom they are a lived experience each day.

Here at our Trust, it is a matter of fact that our BAME colleagues have a worse experience of the workplace than our White colleagues. And we know that our BAME people are over-represented in disciplinary procedures but under-represented in our senior leadership.

We can and must do better.

Taking action to change

We recently published a statement about our need to do more for our diverse communities, including both our patients and our colleagues.

But we know that words alone are not enough: it is our actions that matter. We must make practical changes that have a direct impact on how we treat our BAME colleagues.

On Friday, I wrote to our managers to set out a number of changes that we will make to our recruitment and disciplinary processes, making them more transparent and fairer.

Among other things, we will:

  • require all our recruitment panels to include at least one panel member who is from a BAME group
  • involve BAME colleagues in our disciplinary processes as Cultural Ambassadors.

I also explained that we will be creating a range of new leadership and development opportunities for our BAME people, including creating new shadow management roles across a range of professions which will support our aspiring BAME managers to prepare for substantive roles when they are advertised.

You can read more about these changes on our intranet

Looking to the future

This is only the first step in earning the trust of our BAME communities. I want you to feel able to hold us to account, and to tell us when we get things wrong.

I want to encourage conversations that, until now, have felt too difficult or futile to hold. Your voices are important: we want you to feel confident in speaking up and telling us about your experiences.

At our most recent engagement session, we discussed a number of other ways in which the Trust can offer support, both practically and symbolically. We will continue to work with you in taking these actions forward thoughtfully and with respect.

And to our white colleagues, I ask for your help. We must all take responsibility for creating a culture of inclusion and respect in the way we speak and behave to one another.


We must think critically about how and why things are the way they are – and whether they cause inadvertent harm to our friends and colleagues.

And we must each take action wherever we can to put things right, whether that means fixing a system that doesn’t work well for our non-English speaking patients, or challenging racism whenever we come across it.

Racial inequality has long roots in our history and society. Uprooting it will not happen overnight. But by truly listening to our BAME communities, asking ourselves the hard questions, and making concrete changes in the way we work, we can make a difference.

We are all part of a Team, and we all share our HEART values. I want to thank you all as we start this new work together in the spirit of equality and respect.

Best wishes,

Oh. That's easy.

Say it's a great idea.

Than ask which hospital workers arrived on Windrush so you could have a Thank you tea or something.

 

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2 hours ago, maynardgravy said:

Brace yourselves guys and gals, it's coming.

The missus sent me this from her NHS Trust Chief Exec. Sit down with a large brandy:

 

Dear colleagues,
 
Today is Windrush Day.

It marks the anniversary of the arrival of 492 workers from Jamaica, Trinidad, Tobago and other islands on the ship MV Empire Windrush. Many of them came to join the fledgling NHS, and dedicated their lives to caring for its patients.

On Windrush Day, we recognise the immense contribution of the generation of people who came to Britain at that time to offer their skills, hard work and generosity of spirit. Their diverse cultures have become a vital part of the rich tapestry of British life. Many of you may be their children or grandchildren.
This is an important day for us to reflect on our responsibilities towards the Windrush generation, their descendants, and our wider Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) communities.

Across the country, Covid-19 has laid bare the structural inequalities in our wider society. These inequalities will have already been starkly apparent to many in our BAME communities, for whom they are a lived experience each day.

Here at our Trust, it is a matter of fact that our BAME colleagues have a worse experience of the workplace than our White colleagues. And we know that our BAME people are over-represented in disciplinary procedures but under-represented in our senior leadership.

We can and must do better.

Taking action to change

We recently published a statement about our need to do more for our diverse communities, including both our patients and our colleagues.

But we know that words alone are not enough: it is our actions that matter. We must make practical changes that have a direct impact on how we treat our BAME colleagues.

On Friday, I wrote to our managers to set out a number of changes that we will make to our recruitment and disciplinary processes, making them more transparent and fairer.

Among other things, we will:

  • require all our recruitment panels to include at least one panel member who is from a BAME group
  • involve BAME colleagues in our disciplinary processes as Cultural Ambassadors.

I also explained that we will be creating a range of new leadership and development opportunities for our BAME people, including creating new shadow management roles across a range of professions which will support our aspiring BAME managers to prepare for substantive roles when they are advertised.

You can read more about these changes on our intranet

Looking to the future

This is only the first step in earning the trust of our BAME communities. I want you to feel able to hold us to account, and to tell us when we get things wrong.

I want to encourage conversations that, until now, have felt too difficult or futile to hold. Your voices are important: we want you to feel confident in speaking up and telling us about your experiences.

At our most recent engagement session, we discussed a number of other ways in which the Trust can offer support, both practically and symbolically. We will continue to work with you in taking these actions forward thoughtfully and with respect.

And to our white colleagues, I ask for your help. We must all take responsibility for creating a culture of inclusion and respect in the way we speak and behave to one another.


We must think critically about how and why things are the way they are – and whether they cause inadvertent harm to our friends and colleagues.

And we must each take action wherever we can to put things right, whether that means fixing a system that doesn’t work well for our non-English speaking patients, or challenging racism whenever we come across it.

Racial inequality has long roots in our history and society. Uprooting it will not happen overnight. But by truly listening to our BAME communities, asking ourselves the hard questions, and making concrete changes in the way we work, we can make a difference.

We are all part of a Team, and we all share our HEART values. I want to thank you all as we start this new work together in the spirit of equality and respect.

Best wishes,

Bless them, they must get such a warm feeling placing their big loving arm round the shoulders of the poor helpless little pickaninnies.

How would they survive without the leg up from their well meaning, and highly paid, white masters.

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2 minutes ago, One percent said:

That woman poleski (sp? Again?). Oh, wait, she was descended (not) from native Americans. 

Americans are often confused about their identity. Their great grandparents were just happy to be American. The traditional joke about "talking about the old country" whilst not being sure which one it is, has been in a few films.

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Two points:

The %age BAME in the NHS is way above the level in the population.  Are they doing anything to even out this racial bias?  And are they doing anything to understand this bias -- perhaps there's an institutionalised bias -- maybe management target certain sectors for jobs, etc.

And:

Quote

And we know that our BAME people are over-represented in disciplinary procedures but under-represented in our senior leadership.

The implication is that it is racism.  The answer to that is to work harder to understand the problem, not simply to go with a kneejerk 'it's racism' and suffer downstream consequences.

[I believe that there is a poverty effect going on, and poorer people (of whatever race) might well be more likely to do stuff that needs disciplinary action.  But the answer to that problem isn't to stop the discipline (madness), but to work 'upstream' to sort out the poverty effects.  But note that you don't solve poverty by throwing money at people -- that won't work in the longer term.  You solve poverty by understanding the behaviours that lead to generational poverty.  Eg, at the moment 'nice kids' seem to be doing their homework every day (even though parents are working) while 'feral kids' aren't (even though parents are home) -- there's clearly something very deep that needs to be resolved.  It is quite possibly cultural (but not necessarily 'racial cultural').]

Edited by dgul
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1 minute ago, dgul said:

Two points:

The %age BAME in the NHS is way above the level in the population.  Are they doing anything to even out this racial bias?  And are they doing anything to understand this bias -- perhaps there's an institutionalised bias -- maybe management target certain sectors for jobs, etc.

And:

The implication is that it is racism.  The answer to that is to work harder to understand the problem, not simply to go with a kneejerk 'it's racism' and suffer downstream consequences.

[I believe that there is a poverty effect going on, and poorer people (of whatever race) might well be more likely to do stuff that needs disciplinary action.  But the answer to that problem isn't to stop the discipline (madness), but to work 'upstream' to sort out the poverty effects.  But note that you don't solve poverty by throwing money at people -- that won't work in the longer term.  You solve poverty by understanding the behaviours that lead to generational poverty.  Eg, at the moment 'nice kids' seem to be doing their homework every day (even though parents are working) while 'feral kids' aren't (even though parents are home) -- there's clearly something very deep that needs to be resolved.  It is quite possibly cultural (but not necessarily 'racial cultural').]

👍 reps out of again. Good post. 

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