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Loki

England's Lost Heritage

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Looking into by the story behind the Derwent Dam mentioned in the 3GD thread, I found out that a village was demolished to make way for it.  I wondered if Derwent Hall was outside of the reservoir area (Sadly not) and found this site of all the 'lost' grand houses.

http://www.lostheritage.org.uk/lh_complete_list.html

https://www.getmapping.com/ and the Britain From Above website are good for a melancholic glimpse into the past.  Even my South East standard sub-urban town looks to have been a bucolic rural area, with it's own (Now lost) grand houses...

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30 minutes ago, Loki said:

Looking into by the story behind the Derwent Dam mentioned in the 3GD thread, I found out that a village was demolished to make way for it.  I wondered if Derwent Hall was outside of the reservoir area (Sadly not) and found this site of all the 'lost' grand houses.

http://www.lostheritage.org.uk/lh_complete_list.html

https://www.getmapping.com/ and the Britain From Above website are good for a melancholic glimpse into the past.  Even my South East standard sub-urban town looks to have been a bucolic rural area, with it's own (Now lost) grand houses...

Do a search on dmvs deserted medieval villages .very handy if your into metal

detecting 

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Buildings and settlements normally got abandoned for good reasons and it is only during the past few decades that building conservation has come more to the fore. No doubt some dosbodders are old enough to remember   a time when post war council homes near to jobs, with central heating and indoor plumbing were more desirable than a knackered 300 year old farmhouse in some god forsaken village. Rural life may well have had a good sense of community but it is easy to forget the never ending mud, animals, dirt roads, never being clean, hard manual labour and the very real possibility of going hungry. Halls and Manor Houses are hard to find a purpose for because the high maintenance costs, including many created by historic building conservation regulations, are difficult to balance with the income to be made by trying to adapt them to modern uses. 

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Just now, Caravan Monster said:

Buildings and settlements normally got abandoned for good reasons and it is only during the past few decades that building conservation has come more to the fore. No doubt some dosbodders are old enough to remember   a time when post war council homes near to jobs, with central heating and indoor plumbing were more desirable than a knackered 300 year old farmhouse in some god forsaken village. Rural life may well have had a good sense of community but it is easy to forget the never ending mud, animals, dirt roads, never being clean, hard manual labour and the very real possibility of going hungry. Halls and Manor Houses are hard to find a purpose for because the high maintenance costs, including many created by historic building conservation regulations, are difficult to balance with the income to be made by trying to adapt them to modern uses. 

Cars. That’s why those country hovels in the middle of nowhere are now desirable. When we run out of oil.... 

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Posted (edited)

584CCD35-BC34-4CA4-A5AF-18F81181703C.thumb.jpeg.0fc3ab2eed8726456336f23589ed6ce5.jpeg
 

Where I live was covered in grand houses built by industrialists.  Some still stand, but most were torn down. The area is now a mix of old and new - the old walls and impressive trees are still standing. Makes for an interesting place to walk around on a Summers evening.

9873655D-A2B8-42EF-B3A9-A1379C199F4E.jpeg.2dfa08d36143d9498f529f8aa870b091.jpeg

Edited by OurDayWillCome

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8 minutes ago, OurDayWillCome said:

584CCD35-BC34-4CA4-A5AF-18F81181703C.thumb.jpeg.0fc3ab2eed8726456336f23589ed6ce5.jpeg
 

Where I live was covered in grand houses built by industrialists.  Some still stand, but most were torn down. The area is now a mix of old and new - the old walls and impressive trees are still standing. Makes for an interesting place to walk around on a Summers evening.

Bristol. Exhibition. Now shut the fuck up :Old:

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Posted (edited)

I've just spent the past hour trawling Britain From Above and testing my family on 'what village is this' lol

None of them got the one they spent most of their lives in! Strangely the suburb of London was smaller than their local 'small town' in the countryside

 

Edited by honkydonkey

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1 minute ago, honkydonkey said:

I've just spent the past hour trawling Britain From Above and testing my family on 'what village is this' lol

 

I found an aerial photo of my area from 1928 - amazing detail. Fascinating to see the old building that used to be there before my house was built. I purchased the high res version off them for about £15.

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Posted (edited)
39 minutes ago, Caravan Monster said:

Buildings and settlements normally got abandoned for good reasons and it is only during the past few decades that building conservation has come more to the fore. No doubt some dosbodders are old enough to remember   a time when post war council homes near to jobs, with central heating and indoor plumbing were more desirable than a knackered 300 year old farmhouse in some god forsaken village. Rural life may well have had a good sense of community but it is easy to forget the never ending mud, animals, dirt roads, never being clean, hard manual labour and the very real possibility of going hungry. Halls and Manor Houses are hard to find a purpose for because the high maintenance costs, including many created by historic building conservation regulations, are difficult to balance with the income to be made by trying to adapt them to modern uses. 

But if we want to save statues as a part of our history, then we definitely need to save historically important buildings... 

Edited by SomersetMatt

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I've been doing a lot of walking in the Moors recently, building up to the Lyke Wake Walk and I always find the houses in the middle of nowhere fascinating. Some derelict, but some obviously inhabited. There's one just outside Osmotherly going towards Carlton Bank, a tiny row of houses miles from anywhere, really. Still has a postbox with a daily collection. Made me laugh.

I came across one the other day walking through the woods at the back of Cod Beck - a stone house, completely derelict and overgrown, in the middle of the woods. The walls around the house are still there, and the gateposts, but it made me wonder how long it had been deserted. Probably not as long as you might think. 

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5 minutes ago, Roger_Mellie said:

I've been doing a lot of walking in the Moors recently, building up to the Lyke Wake Walk and I always find the houses in the middle of nowhere fascinating. Some derelict, but some obviously inhabited. There's one just outside Osmotherly going towards Carlton Bank, a tiny row of houses miles from anywhere, really. Still has a postbox with a daily collection. Made me laugh.

I came across one the other day walking through the woods at the back of Cod Beck - a stone house, completely derelict and overgrown, in the middle of the woods. The walls around the house are still there, and the gateposts, but it made me wonder how long it had been deserted. Probably not as long as you might think. 

Take some pics next time you're out that way

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, Loki said:

Heathrow airport and Milton Keynes are worth a look too xD

I worked in MK a couple of years ago. I hated it. In the evenings I fortunately found the original MK village in one of the blocks and went to the pub there.

A lot of the houses are 1970's 'experimental' and haven't aged well.

The straight roads and badly designed junctions were lethal. Never seen so many road accidents in one month.

Everything is 'planned'. No organic evolution and adaptation over centuries; no historic interest.

I expect I would hate Prince Charles' Poundland even more, where every class has their own little pigeon hole according to Charles' fantasy social hierarchy.

Might as well be Marie Antoinette's fantasy village. Prince Charles could dress up as a shepherdess instead of his usual Scottish Laird.

Edited by Happy Renting

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7 hours ago, Caravan Monster said:

 a time when post war council homes near to jobs, with central heating and indoor plumbing were more desirable than a knackered 300 year old farmhouse in some god forsaken village. 

Most of the EA ramping throughout Covid has been the narrative that the rural property market will see a ''resurgence''

A resurgence?? All my adult life rural property has been as in demand and pricey as any other desirable area. You'd think you could still buy a hovel in the hills for pennies the way they're talking.

 

On the theme of changing desirability I remember reading somewhere that back in the pre-tourism days when coastal villages were proper working villages inhabited by locals, the houses with the sea views were the least desirable... partly because they were most exposed to the elements but also the sailors and fishermen who were the residents of those villages would be sick of the sight of the sea and preferred to not have to look at it!

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7 hours ago, honkydonkey said:

I've just spent the past hour trawling Britain From Above and testing my family on 'what village is this' lol

None of them got the one they spent most of their lives in! Strangely the suburb of London was smaller than their local 'small town' in the countryside

 

There's a small village on the edge of my old hometown in Derbyshire called Charlesworth, 1 shop and 1 pub and yet pre-industrial revolution and pre-cotton, back when wool was a valuable commodity it was a bigger, wealthier and more important place than a neighbouring village a few miles down the road called ''Manchester''

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, Royston said:

There's a small village on the edge of my old hometown in Derbyshire called Charlesworth, 1 shop and 1 pub and yet pre-industrial revolution and pre-cotton, back when wool was a valuable commodity it was a bigger, wealthier and more important place than a neighbouring village a few miles down the road called ''Manchester''

Same with some of the hamlets in Staffordshire to local market towns take stoke its hardly got any history then things got interesting when they got into makeing pots big time

Edited by stokiescum

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That Britain From Above site is actually quite depressing in a way.

I look at aerial photos of where I live (which is a very nice area now) and realise how un-built-up/spoilt it was just 80/90 years ago.

 

There's a bit of a parallel with society too. 

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11 hours ago, SomersetMatt said:

But if we want to save statues as a part of our history, then we definitely need to save historically important buildings... 

Yes, but the problem is where to draw the line. Churches are a prime example, virtually every village has one and with dwindling congregations how will the maintenance be paid for into the future. Residential conversions never seem all that great and demolishing them is too much an expression of a defeated culture having it's history erased. Difficult to get right.

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4 minutes ago, Caravan Monster said:

Yes, but the problem is where to draw the line. Churches are a prime example, virtually every village has one and with dwindling congregations how will the maintenance be paid for into the future. Residential conversions never seem all that great and demolishing them is too much an expression of a defeated culture having it's history erased. Difficult to get right.

They will be repurposed as mosques. 

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1 hour ago, Boglet said:

That Britain From Above site is actually quite depressing in a way.

I look at aerial photos of where I live (which is a very nice area now) and realise how un-built-up/spoilt it was just 80/90 years ago.

 

There's a bit of a parallel with society too. 

Yeah, that's why I shan't be taking a look. I know how fucked this area is now, and how beautiful it was even 30 years ago, I don't need to remind myself.

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Posted (edited)

The example I always use when taking about English heritage is the centre of Gloucester. Now Gloucester has always had one of the best cathedrals in Europe, but it used to have one of ‘the finest medieval market squares’ as well. The post-war, egalitarian planners, saw fit to knock this down in favour of a ‘utilitarian, modern, market place with concrete walk-ways and accessible spaces!’ Whereas the medieval market-place lasted 500 years, the new monstrosity is soon to be replaced after 50 years. Progress!!! I honestly believe that whoever was responsible for knocking down the medieval architecture, should be hung, drawn (over the non existent cobble stones) and quartered. I thank you... 

Edited by SomersetMatt

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On 29/06/2020 at 21:49, Caravan Monster said:

Buildings and settlements normally got abandoned for good reasons and it is only during the past few decades that building conservation has come more to the fore. No doubt some dosbodders are old enough to remember   a time when post war council homes near to jobs, with central heating and indoor plumbing were more desirable than a knackered 300 year old farmhouse in some god forsaken village. Rural life may well have had a good sense of community but it is easy to forget the never ending mud, animals, dirt roads, never being clean, hard manual labour and the very real possibility of going hungry. Halls and Manor Houses are hard to find a purpose for because the high maintenance costs, including many created by historic building conservation regulations, are difficult to balance with the income to be made by trying to adapt them to modern uses. 

A lot of the old terraced houses that were demolished in the 60s could have been saved a few years later with modern methods of retro-fitting.

At the time it was cheaper just to pull them down and put people in tower blocks. Like most of the worst social policies, it happened because it pleased both left and right: the right got the money and building contracts and the left hoped that by forcing people to live in Stalinist conditions the working class would become more Stalinist themselves.

 

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