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Back to work, ye skurvy dawgs!


Dave Bloke
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Wight Flight
41 minutes ago, Roger_Mellie said:

My last day in the office was 11th of March. My productivity and motivation are in tatters and I'm really struggling to stay positive. 

You must work for one of my suppliers.

Now where is that bloody quote I asked you for on Tuesday?

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1 hour ago, stop_the_craziness said:

Nice cheeky bit of propaganda there from the so-called.  I look forward to next week's article about all of us who hated working in offices and all the many reasons why that nobody ever cared enough to write an article about.

Winners and losers BBC, winners and losers.  Maybe if they actually cared about their impartiality remit they could have put the winners and losers into this same article?  Wonder why they didn't do that?

I would say that the losers are having more negative effects than the winners' positive.

The separation from colleagues slows things down so that everything takes longer.  For some that's a decent quid pro quo for not having to commute but for others, especially those with children at home, it means working until ten or eleven at night.  I know two people who had been doing this and one went off with stress and then just left.  Their work / life balance had gone out of the window.

There is also a big problem for people who are in small and particularly shared accommodation.  There is no office for quiet and separation from the rest of the house; there isn't room for a proper office chair and big screen and keyboard so it's hunched over a laptop with accompanying back ache and eye strain.  Plus when you do finish you're often looking at your work area so you never really leave work as it's taken over a part of your home.

And this is all for existing workers.  How do you train up new workers?  And how do new processes originate?

Everyone working from home is a short term Elastoplast with far more losers than winners IMO.

Prior to this I used to work one or two days from home per week and would encourage my staff to do the same.  I found that the contrast boosted overall productivity and energy levels.  Hopefully a positive outcome from this long-running Whitehall Farce will be that other companies view their staff working from home one or two days a week as being to both their and the company's benefit.

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stop_the_craziness

Yeah, I guess everyone's personal experiences are different so fair enough.   

My organisation had a pretty strong working from home culture already, so the communication patterns are unaffected.  We had a new comms developer start the day after lockdown who is an absolute superstar and has learned everything via Microsoft Teams knowledge sessions that we have run with him, but perhaps that's because he fully expected to work from home 3 days a week already before things changed so he has the right kind of personality for that sort of remote working and learning.  His contributions to those sessions via his fresh perspective have also meant that we've changed established working practices that the person in his role previously didn't question so I think process innovation comes from people having innovative minds rather than from people necessarily having physical proximity.

I also share a house and work on the sofa on my laptop and haven't had any issues with either of those things but I guess it depends on who you share with and what the rest of your mental and physical health and fitness are like.  I also do a totally paper-free job so as soon as my day is over the laptop goes in the cupboard, I go out for a long walk and when I come home the lounge is just the lounge again.

The kids one I can't argue.  It must be difficult.  It will be interesting to see how things pan out if/when kids go back to school but their parents haven't gone back to the office.

The best outcome from this situation is that people are allowed to make the choices that suit them and their employer the best.  Like I said, we had a pretty flexible culture before so I guess in this case it will depend on the starting point as much as the end point in what comes next.

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Virgil Caine
1 hour ago, stop_the_craziness said:

Yeah, I guess everyone's personal experiences are different so fair enough.   

My organisation had a pretty strong working from home culture already, so the communication patterns are unaffected.  We had a new comms developer start the day after lockdown who is an absolute superstar and has learned everything via Microsoft Teams knowledge sessions that we have run with him, but perhaps that's because he fully expected to work from home 3 days a week already before things changed so he has the right kind of personality for that sort of remote working and learning. 

I personally know about an upcoming office move planned before Covid-19 that was planning a 6 workstations to 10 people hot desk environment.This essentially meant they had a substantial element of home working already baked into their projections. Personally I think employers will be looking to select staff in the future who can handle that set up so people that can not function without the prop of the office environment may struggle in the job market going forward. 

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4 hours ago, Wight Flight said:

You must work for one of my suppliers.

Now where is that bloody quote I asked you for on Tuesday?

Or teachers pensions. They are beyond incompetent and blame it on the virus.  
 

it is run by Crapita though, so not really a surprise. 

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Roger_Mellie
3 hours ago, Virgil Caine said:

I personally know about an upcoming office move planned before Covid-19 that was planning a 6 workstations to 10 people hot desk environment.This essentially meant they had a substantial element of home working already baked into their projections. Personally I think employers will be looking to select staff in the future who can handle that set up so people that can not function without the prop of the office environment may struggle in the job market going forward. 

Which is entirely different to enforced full time working at home. 

2 hours ago, One percent said:

Or teachers pensions. They are beyond incompetent and blame it on the virus.  
 

it is run by Crapita though, so not really a surprise. 

I'm not incompetent, just struggling a bit as I enter my 7th month of working full time from my spare room. 

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4 minutes ago, Roger_Mellie said:

Which is entirely different to enforced full time working at home. 

I'm not incompetent, just struggling a bit as I enter my 7th month of working full time from my spare room. 

Soz. Didn’t mean to suggest you were. A response to flighty. 

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Wight Flight
1 hour ago, Roger_Mellie said:

Which is entirely different to enforced full time working at home. 

I'm not incompetent, just struggling a bit as I enter my 7th month of working full time from my spare room. 

Technically it is no longer a spare room.

It is now a divisional office of Bastard Inc.

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People on the radio pushing for a tax break for those going back to work in the cities like London (but I wonder if they really mean just their London) rather than working from home.  Apparently it's irresponsible not being a commuting wage slave giving unto Caesar.  Also coercion through the idea some cheaper bod over in India will get your job if you work from home.  Presumably life in London not as good for the residents without all the support workers and not nice having people spend their money locally rather than in precious London.  Somehow spending the money locally at home is not so good for the economy, or should that be their London economy.  And tax and regulation is bad unless it works for you.  As the guest MP said, you probably just need to get used to it sonny.  After all it was not an issue when locals in Cornwall couldn't compete with Londoners wanting second homes.  The apparent sense of privilege and entitlement......

Edited by Harley
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  • 3 weeks later...

If working from home is so efficient, why do.so many firms have an automated telephone message saying 'please understand that your enquiry may take longer to answer as all our staff are working from home'?

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On 22/08/2020 at 14:41, Frank Hovis said:

Everyone working from home is a short term Elastoplast with far more losers than winners IMO.

I'm loving it, and I don't give a monkeys toss how much damage its doing to any one/thing else. 

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1 minute ago, goldbug9999 said:

I'm loving it, and I don't give a monkeys toss how much damage its doing to any one/thing else. 

 

I think that's the commonest attitide and I don't blame you in the slightest; people rarely work for altruistic reasons.

I woudl however like to think that Chief Execs can do the thought exercise of what will happen to their company if their staff all work in semi-isolation.

The big sin used to be "silo working" - departments working independently of each other - well now we have silo working for indviduals.

Everything slows and sytems ossify until you realise that your competition has just buried you and everyone is out of a job.

This isn't nostalgia on my part - computers are better than typewriters, no argument there - but thirty years working at senior levels in companies and knowing how the incremental improvements happen.  These are generally through ideas floated after meetings rather than during them and on the agenda.

 

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27 minutes ago, Wight Flight said:

If working from home is so efficient, why do.so many firms have an automated telephone message saying 'please understand that your enquiry may take longer to answer as all our staff are working from home'?

Same reason as when everyone is sat in a fucking office.

 

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unregistered_guest
20 hours ago, ashestoashes said:

who'll be the first company to make their offices more like a working from home experience ?

By scattering a few random pets and children about the place to act as distractions?

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Creative destruction, with winners and losers, just as it ever was.  Some companies fail to meet the challenge, whilst others start up or step in to take their business, or carve new niches.

I feel the pain of those who have lost out, or are about to lose out. It's not going to be easy for them, but there are others who have seized the crisis and turned it into an opportunity. Those are the people that will build the new economy, creating jobs and wealth for the future.

What I think the government should be doing is figuring out how to minimise the pain and personal damage so as many people as possible are able to grasp the new opportunities that are arising. 

I'd be looking to overhaul the bankruptcy laws for a start.  We've always had a culture in this country of "fail once, no second chances", and this needs to change. It won't help the economy to recover if small business owners and entrepreneurs are prevented from picking up the pieces and starting over because government action has destroyed their businesses.  Some specific changes might include :-

1. For small businesses, a no-fault bankruptcy.  If your business failed purely due to the lockdown, your credit rating and ability to start over aren't affected.

2. Supply chain bailouts.  If your customer can't pay their debt for goods / services rendered, or you can't pay your suppliers, the state steps in to compensate the creditor to minimise knock-on effects.

3. Primary home protection. e.g  If you put up your home as security to get a loan to start a new business that was then killed by the lockdown, the state should take on the guarantee instead. Even the most talented entrepreneurs will find it hard to start over if they suddenly find themselves homeless.

The above should apply to real, productive SMEs, not leveraged BTL / rent-seeking businesses of course.  Investors shouldn't be bailed out, since their job is to take risks.

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59 minutes ago, MvR said:

The above should apply to real, productive SMEs, not leveraged BTL / rent-seeking businesses of course.  Investors shouldn't be bailed out, since their job is to take risks.

Great, so all you have to do now is find a bullet proof way of telling the difference. 

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stop_the_craziness
On 09/09/2020 at 22:04, Wight Flight said:

If working from home is so efficient, why do.so many firms have an automated telephone message saying 'please understand that your enquiry may take longer to answer as all our staff are working from home'?

Poor management, or inflexible systems that can't adapt?  Or they've furloughed half the staff so the government pays their wages rather than the company even though they were actually needed as the business volumes weren't that different?  

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  • 11 months later...
Dave Bloke

After a further batch of home working everyone, or practically everyone, seems to be back in the office in France. Only some people sold their houses and moved to the sticks !

The traffic is worse than ever. French GPS maker estimates journey times are 10% longer than before lockdown.

At the same time there are 1 million vacancies at the job center, the first time it has ever gone over a million... but 5 million unemployed.

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Frank Hovis
11 hours ago, Dave Bloke said:

After a further batch of home working everyone, or practically everyone, seems to be back in the office in France. Only some people sold their houses and moved to the sticks !

The traffic is worse than ever. French GPS maker estimates journey times are 10% longer than before lockdown.

At the same time there are 1 million vacancies at the job center, the first time it has ever gone over a million... but 5 million unemployed.

I'm hopeful that the same will happen here because Cornwall to London is an impossible commute so they will all have to sell up at a loss and move back to their two bed flats in the suburbs; so crashing the local market.

I heard of someone who was commuting daily from Polperro to Gloucester which made my jaw drop.

Three hours eight minutes without traffic jams and 176 miles.

Each way.

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Frank Hovis
3 hours ago, Frank Hovis said:

I heard of someone who was commuting daily from Polperro to Gloucester which made my jaw drop.

Three hours eight minutes without traffic jams and 176 miles.

Each way.

 

I'm quoting myself here but just mulling on the sheer horror of that it's:

Seven hours a day commuting even if it goes smoothly when you add in parking and walking to and from your car.

Most normal business days are typically nine and a half to ten hours (start at nine, leave between half five and six) say ten.

That means that you are physically at home for seven hours in which time you need to eat, wind down for sleep, and then shit shower and shave and away.

Five hours sleep absolute max.

Apparently he looked like Mick Aston off Time Team but was probably only thirty.

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15 hours ago, Dave Bloke said:

After a further batch of home working everyone, or practically everyone, seems to be back in the office in France. Only some people sold their houses and moved to the sticks !

The traffic is worse than ever. French GPS maker estimates journey times are 10% longer than before lockdown.

At the same time there are 1 million vacancies at the job center, the first time it has ever gone over a million... but 5 million unemployed.

5 million!

Then why are all the immigrants coming to the UK then?

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