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Bus Stop Boxer

You are the Vet

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Posted (edited)

OK pop pickers. What do the panel think is going on here? Male retriever. 6 years old. Patch is just behind his left eye going towards his ear flap.

Im now £160 down the road with the local vet and this patch is still producing a thickish colourless, odourless lymph type substance.

Its never been infected or pus producing.

I have had him on Rilexene antibiotics for a week and now a steroid cream. Im giving it a wash with hibiscrub every night. Its been there nearly 2 weeks.

I suggested ringworm to the vet but she has said its not that. Poor fella has a sock (safely) cable tied to his back foot so he cant scratch the hell out of it.

DSC_0303.JPG

Edited by Bus Stop Boxer

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31 minutes ago, The Masked Tulip said:

Looks like a sebaceous cyst to me. Humans get them. Dogs get them. Mammals... You get my drift.

Warm water applied several times per day I would guess. What does the internet say?

 

skincyst201801scaler.jpg?la=en&hash=81F8

 

https://vcahospitals.com/know-your-pet/cysts

Vet described it as a "hotspot", which i didnt think was particularly scientific language.

Could well be this, thanks. However its never been anything other than flat against his skin.

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Posted (edited)

Your vet described it as a hotspot yet did not prescribe sulphur? Change vets.

Use this in your dog's drinking water, a piece the size of half a walnut will do:

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Hatchwells-Rock-Sulphur-for-All-Animals-Keep-Pets-Cool-Dogs-Cats-Horse-Mammals/251686557433

Topically, dab on cooled black tea—no milk, no sugar. It is very soothing and in case of secondary fungus infestation it will knock it out.

 

 

Edited by Conniption
chuck all steroidals in the bin. They are poison. And addictive. Just because your vet's a doctor doesn't mean he knows what he's doing when it comes to corporate pharmaceuticals.

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Posted (edited)
30 minutes ago, Bus Stop Boxer said:

Vet described it as a "hotspot", which i didnt think was particularly scientific language.

Could well be this, thanks. However its never been anything other than flat against his skin.

 

A hotspot usually refers to a bit of dermatitis or folliculitis.

I am not a vet. But there is no money in telling you that it is a cyst that may go away by itself in time. Applying warm compresses might help - i.e. dip a bit of cotton wool or tissue in warm water and dab regularly.

Sometimes they grow bigger and need to be popped or cut away.

You can go on youtube and do a search for 'dog sebaceous cyst' to see plenty of them. Or you can just go on youtube and find Dr. PimplePopper's channel where she pops and cuts away lots of these cysts on humans.

The cause of these cysts can be anything from a simple knock, to an infection, to a gland getting over-active for a while, to a hair folicle going nuts. Mostly they are keratin - the stuff your hair is made of - from a gland or hair folicle.

Either it will settle down by itself and gradually go away. Or it will get bigger and might then need removing.

 

If it is more dermatitis then consider using a special sensitive skin shampoo to wash your dog. I think you can get special dog ones but I have washed dogs using human sensitive shampoos such as:

Alphosyl 2-In-1 Medicated Shampoo (I use this on my hair as I have a tiny bit of dermatitis that flares up if I use most branded shampoos.)

But you can also look at Neutrogena T/Gel Therapeutic Shampoo or Nizoral Anti-Dandruff Shampoo. All can be bought in a chemist or from Boots, Amazon, Superdrug, etc.

Most shampoos have wheat in them so if you, or a dog, has a wheat intolerance then you can end up with demeratitis. Friends have a French blue bulldog - ugly dog IMPO. The dog's skin got very tender and, several hundred pounds later paid to a vet for special food and tablets, the dog was no better off.

My friend then went to a different vet who, for free, told them to not let the dog eat wheat and to wash it regularly with a dermatitis shampoo like one of the above. Within a few weeks the dogs was healing, eventually got better and is still ugly... but my friends love her.

Edited by The Masked Tulip
typo

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Seems the hotspot decription is widely recognised. 4th retriever in my family and never had an incident before.

Most likely got it from dampness under his ear flap after a bath.

Will be washing it more frequently with hibiscrub now and drying off then using more frequent applications of Isaderm cream prescribed by vet.

Vet said only clean up once a day with hibscrub but im now going to do 3 times a day. A good pat dry and then apply the cream. A breeder i know suggested a puff of talc to help dry out the site.

The vet charged me nearly 50 quid for 14 rilexene pills that are .72p each online. I have registered my displeasure and will be changing vets anyway.

They have done his booster jab as a geture of goodwill but the blatant profiteering and slightly off advice means i am done with them.

They never waste an opportunity to fleece the punter, and now having to wait outside, due to Convid while they see to your animal, removes the to and fro, which can often result in a lower bill in my experience.

 

Cheers for all input.

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17 minutes ago, The Masked Tulip said:

 

A hotspot usually refers to a bit of dermatitis or folliculitis.

I am not a vet. But there is no money in telling you that it is a cyst that may go away by itself in time. Applying warm compresses might help - i.e. dip a bit of cotton wool or tissue in warm water and dab regularly.

Sometimes they grow bigger and need to be popped or cut away.

You can go on youtube and do a search for 'dog sebaceous cyst' to see plenty of them. Or you can just go on youtube and find Dr. PimplePopper's channel where she pops and cuts away lots of these cysts on humans.

The cause of these cysts can be anything from a simple knock, to an infection, to a gland getting over-active for a while, to a hair folicle going nuts. Mostly they are keratin - the stuff your hair is made of - from a gland or hair folicle.

Either it will settle down by itself and gradually go away. Or it will get bigger and might then need removing.

 

If it is more dermatitis then consider using a special sensitive skin shampoo to wash your dog. I think you can get special dog ones but I have washed dogs using human sensitive shampoos such as:

Alphosyl 2-In-1 Medicated Shampoo (I use this on my hair as I have a tiny bit of dermatitis that flares up if I use most branded shampoos.)

But you can also look at Neutrogena T/Gel Therapeutic Shampoo or Nizoral Anti-Dandruff Shampoo. All can be bought in a chemist or from Boots, Amazon, Superdrug, etc.

Most shampoos have wheat in them so if you, or a dog, has a wheat intolerance then you can end up with demeratitis. Friends have a French blue ugly dog. The dog's skin got very tender and, several hundred pounds later paid to a vet for special food and tablets, the dog was no better off. My friend then went to a different vet who, for free, told them to not let the dog eat wheat and to wash it regularly with one a dermatitis shampoo like one of the above. Within a few weeks the dogs was healing, eventually got better and is still ugly... but my friends love her.

Cheers for this. He's on a grain free diet anyway as he gets terrible shits with regular dog food. I use a pets at home special dog shampoo or a mild flea one.

Not Bob Martin though. Bob Martin is the devils work.

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21 minutes ago, Conniption said:

Your vet described it as a hotspot yet did not prescribe sulphur? Change vets.

Use this in your dog's drinking water, a piece the size of half a walnut will do:

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Hatchwells-Rock-Sulphur-for-All-Animals-Keep-Pets-Cool-Dogs-Cats-Horse-Mammals/251686557433

Topically, dab on cooled black tea—no milk, no sugar. It is very soothing and in case of secondary fungus infestation it will knock it out.

 

 

Will give the black tea a whirl. I must say the sock and cable tie combo has kept him off it for a good while.

Dont think i could handle a retriever with a lampshade on his head. Carnage.

Cheers.

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4 minutes ago, Bus Stop Boxer said:

Cheers for this. He's on a grain free diet anyway as he gets terrible shits with regular dog food. I use a pets at home special dog shampoo or a mild flea one.

Not Bob Martin though. Bob Martin is the devils work.

 

Check the shampoo for gluten or wheat. I, as someone who avoids all wheat, was shocked to discover a fee years ago that most shampoo contains it. They often list it using some letters and numbers or some science babble name. I have read that some shampoos do not list it at all.

 

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18 minutes ago, Hopeful said:

Sudacrem is a good cream

You should visit "Vibe" nightclub in Peterlee - perhaps the best place in the North East to find a box of assorted creams...

 

XYY

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2 minutes ago, The XYY Man said:

You should visit "Vibe" nightclub in Peterlee - perhaps the best place in the North East to find a box of assorted creams...

 

XYY

so long as here are no custard creams

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One of our dogs has numerous patches of tough, bare skin, mainly on his joints, from his previous life of I'm guessing being farmyard dog and sleeping on a bare concrete floor, these occasionally become inflamed and irritable for him, we usually find good old Savlon works well to soothe and calm it. 

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9 minutes ago, Heart's Ease said:

Thumbs up for sudacrem and T/gel shampoo.

Have not heard of black tea treatment @Conniption - our three year old spaniel suffers with dry skin in the summer so will scratch and scratch. Tea bag bath next.

Tea is a funny thing.

Ginger bloke I knew at school would apply cold tea bags to sunburn. Swore by it as a soothing mechanism.

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Heart's Ease said:

Thumbs up for sudacrem and T/gel shampoo.

Have not heard of black tea treatment @Conniption - our three year old spaniel suffers with dry skin in the summer so will scratch and scratch. Tea bag bath next.

steep ten black bags for twenty minutes while it cools, then add it to your spaniel's warm bath and ladle it over them for three or four minutes with your soft, pink dimpled hands—no shampoo, just tea. I think you will be amazed at the glossy state of his/her coat when dry. The tannins in the tea are kind to skin and soak dirt and debris away without stripping all the oils like detergents are designed to do.

If he/she is really muddy after a walk, rinse first (no shampoo), then do the tea bath, towel them off and let them dry.

If he ever gets hotspots, a small piece rock sulphur slowly dissolving in his drinking bowl is a classic treatment that is old as the hills. Pharmaceutical companies can't charge an arm and a leg for it since it's so old it's un-patentable, hence vets hardly ever prescribing it. Dogs don't sweat through their pores like people do so the sulphur will cool their blood in summer and help them get through when they itch one particular spot that troubles them until it becomes a hairless patch.

(PS: If your spaniel rolls in a puddle of oil on the driveway that's when you break out the detergents!)

Edited by Conniption
dirty is as dirty does

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