Jump to content
DOSBODS
  • Welcome to DOSBODS

     

    DOSBODS is free of any advertising.

    Ads are annoying, and - increasingly - advertising companies limit free speech online. DOSBODS Forums are completely free to use. Please create a free account to be able to access all the features of the DOSBODS community. It only takes 20 seconds!

     

Guilty of complicity


Recommended Posts

9 minutes ago, invalid said:

I was just reading the following:

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-8494579/Former-Nazi-camp-guard-93-serve-three-years-prison.html

 

It's another old man being trialled because they were in the SS. While he didn't actually do anything directly, he was charged with being 'complicit'.

"chief prosecutor Lars Mahnke said Dey knew about the 'state-organised mass murder' happening around him and should have climbed down from the tower and handed in his weapon." - err, really?

My grandfather spent the war in a concentration camp. He was lucky to survive, probably helped in part because he was British and they did not know his true ethnicity. Despite that, I see no point or benefit in sending 90 year old men to jail. It's too late, it won't change anything and it would be nothing more than revenge.

 

So on to modern times.

I've seen comments on other forums, relating to BLM along the lines of "if you are not part of the solution, you are part of the problem".

In the coming years, will frail and old white people be put on trial because they did not 'take a knee' or did not clap on a Thursday, or did not do enough to stamp out racism?

 

 

 

They have to keep the nightmare alive.

Wait till they start going after the kids of the SS.

Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, GBDamo said:

They have to keep the nightmare alive.

Wait till they start going after the kids of the SS.

That's how it seems to me, they are desperately looking for anyone left alive to prosecute. As far as I'm concerend, its all history now. Just like statues of long dead slave traders.

I would wager that a number of people are benefitting financially from it.

Perhaps that is the next step - reparations due from the descendants.

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, invalid said:

In the coming years, will frail and old white people be put on trial because they did not 'take a knee' or did not clap on a Thursday, or did not do enough to stamp out racism?

 

This.

Why the new Red Guard are dangerous. Evil really.

You have made a strong and valid point.

I hope the collective wake up

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
50 minutes ago, stop_the_craziness said:

On the bright side, it means there's still another 25 years to get that fucker Tony Blair into jail.

Those who were in charge claim they were following the best expert advice available to them. This would be Blair’s defence. Those who were not in charge claim they were following orders. So it’s never anyone’s fault these days. 

It’s time we returned to the tradition where those in charge are automatically responsible for what is done, it’s the only way for them to be motivated enough to ensure the advice they receive is correct. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Had a very drunken and interesting late night chat with a German exchange student when younger, and discussed how they regard their grandparents history compared to ours.

"No, no ,no. It isn't a problem. Not one grandfather was a camp guard, served in th SS or even the front line. Cooks! All cooks. Cooks! Cooks! Cooks! But none can cook and there are no recipes left over"

Thought highly of her being so honest. She was vociferous about how it is the "thing that is never discussed".

Link to post
Share on other sites

So he was 17, a conscript assigned to guard duty because his heart condition made him unfit for front-line service.

He would have been four years old when Hitler came to power, so he grew up in a time of indoctrination, cleansing of other viewpoints, probably had to join the Hitler youth etc.

The rest of the world looked on as all that happened. They appeased and prevaricated and turned away Jews and thanked their lucky stars they didn't need to do anything about it (until they no longer had any choice).

Anyone condemning him should reflect what they themselves would have done at 17, living his life and standing in his shoes.

I bet not one of the oh-so-noble people prosecuting and sentencing him would have behaved any differently.

"There but for the Grace of God go I."

Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, NewryH said:

Shit. My uncle (by marriage) was in the ss. He's dead now a few years as is my aunty. Hopefully my cousins will cough up the cash for reparations and I'll be left out of it.

My great grandfather was in the SS. OMG I'm a fucking nazi 🙄

Link to post
Share on other sites

It's called emotional correctness.

Emotional correctness is basically defined as vehemence of expression as the marker of all sincerity. Ie the louder you shout the more correct you are perceived to be. 

In communist countries, it was dangerous to be the first to stop applauding the dictator’s speech and safer to exhibit one’s enthusiasm to the maximum. In addition, in a culture such as ours, which values the kind of emotional openness that is usually indistinguishable from psychobabble, vehemence is again to be expected.

Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, Lightly Toasted said:

So he was 17, a conscript assigned to guard duty because his heart condition made him unfit for front-line service.

He would have been four years old when Hitler came to power, so he grew up in a time of indoctrination, cleansing of other viewpoints, probably had to join the Hitler youth etc.

The rest of the world looked on as all that happened. They appeased and prevaricated and turned away Jews and thanked their lucky stars they didn't need to do anything about it (until they no longer had any choice).

Anyone condemning him should reflect what they themselves would have done at 17, living his life and standing in his shoes.

I bet not one of the oh-so-noble people prosecuting and sentencing him would have behaved any differently.

"There but for the Grace of God go I."

I think you make some very good points.... but '17 and a heart condition', he's 93 now  What was his heart condition?

Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, Lightly Toasted said:

So he was 17, a conscript assigned to guard duty because his heart condition made him unfit for front-line service.

He would have been four years old when Hitler came to power, so he grew up in a time of indoctrination, cleansing of other viewpoints, probably had to join the Hitler youth etc.

The rest of the world looked on as all that happened. They appeased and prevaricated and turned away Jews and thanked their lucky stars they didn't need to do anything about it (until they no longer had any choice).

Anyone condemning him should reflect what they themselves would have done at 17, living his life and standing in his shoes.

I bet not one of the oh-so-noble people prosecuting and sentencing him would have behaved any differently.

"There but for the Grace of God go I."

If this was happening anywhere else in the world it would be condemned as a Kangaroo Court.

Hypocrites.

A kangaroo court may ignore due process and come to a predetermined conclusion.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
15 hours ago, GBDamo said:

They have to keep the nightmare alive.

Wait till they start going after the kids of the SS.

Probably partly so that they can keep the insult "nazi" alive - now aimed at all who disagree with the narrative.

I doubt they haven't known about him all along.  After committing an offence during WW2 then they should have held him to account decades ago.

 

 

Edited by twocents
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, NewryH said:

I think you make some very good points.... but '17 and a heart condition', he's 93 now  What was his heart condition?

I wondered that myself. I think it's probably irrelevant to the justice of the matter, other than as a slightly belated charge of medical malingering.

It occurs to me that Germans who "went along" with things were in a kind of Catch-22 situation. If they resisted, they faced imprisonment or execution by the Nazi authorities. If they followed orders (even passively) they later faced the same fate, but with the Allied authorities.

The only sure way out was not to be a young German man in the 1940s.

Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Lightly Toasted said:

I wondered that myself. I think it's probably irrelevant to the justice of the matter, other than as a slightly belated charge of medical malingering.

It occurs to me that Germans who "went along" with things were in a kind of Catch-22 situation. If they resisted, they faced imprisonment or execution by the Nazi authorities. If they followed orders (even passively) they later faced the same fate, but with the Allied authorities.

The only sure way out was not to be a young German man in the 1940s.

I guess it was a career move in the regime of the time. There are still such regimes today. Obey, or you don't have a job. I have met several people who left Iran, as they wouldn't obey the Ayahtollahs, for very different reasons. As one bloke put it "No Pray, No Pay".

Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

On a much smaller scale of course

2 hours ago, Chewing Grass said:

If this was happening anywhere else in the world it would be condemned as a Kangaroo Court.

Hypocrites.

A kangaroo court may ignore due process and come to a predetermined conclusion.

 

.

Quote

But chief prosecutor Lars Mahnke said Dey knew about the 'state-organised mass murder' happening around him and should have climbed down from the tower and handed in his weapon.

On a much smaller scale of course but you just need to read reports of what happens to whistle blowers in the UK to know about figuratively climbing down from the tower and handing in the weapon. 

Leaving his post - firing squad?  Possibly even in the UK military sometimes in the past during war?

Edited by twocents
Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Capital punishment in (Nazi) Germany

Additional forms declared treason could (in some cases, especially for soldiers, mandatorily) be prosecuted with death, as could grave arson,[16] aiding and abetting treason, betraying a secret (mandatorily), procuring a secret for the sake of betraying it, insidious publishing or rhetoric, failure to denounce a capital crime, destroying means for military use, sabotage (mandatorily for soldiers), kidnapping (mandatorily),[17] compassing or imagining the death of a NS or state official for political reasons or the reason of their service,[18] setting a car trap for the means of robbery (mandatorily), espionage (mandatorily), partisanry (mandatorily), all cases of desertion

From this distance we can't tell if he would have been executed for "climbing down from the tower" but the rules appeared to mandate that. Unthinkable? The comparatively-civilised British were shooting exhausted young men for falling asleep when they'd been told not to, not long before.

Edited by Lightly Toasted
Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Part of the narrative in movies and just generally about nazi Germany during the war has been how about brutal and ruthless they were and according to the movies officers would shoot people including soldiers there and then for just speaking a word out of place.  That might have been the reality. 

Now it seems that there's a different narrative - he could just climb down from the tower and hand in his weapon and I expect the prosecutors think after that he could have just walked away and gone back home.  Maybe even take a ride on a military bus to do that - even a Mercedes..

You have to ask which is true.

Whatever - it's a fair bet that the public are being played yet again.

Edited by twocents
Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, twocents said:

Whatever - it's a fair bet that the public are being played yet again.

Yes, we believe Ficts. Snapshots of a previous era where John Mills saved the British Empire, narrated by Noel Coward.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...