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MrPin

Does anyone here still use film cameras?

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Just had a couple of films printed that go back some years.

I think these film cameras are not made any more. I also don't think they are worth much. The cameras I have would have bought a decent car when new, er 30 years ago.O.o

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I have a Canon EOS 50 which my daughter now uses and she has just bought a old Nikon from the 80's - everything on it is manual - for £80 - it's a good camera to really learn about how to take a good photo. 

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Oh no, definitely new toys for me. Digital photography is so much easier, and better. 

I started with a Box Brownie I think it was, it might have been made by Kodak! Then I bought some Russian thingy, they were quite common, sold it and purchased a Pentax ME Super, that I still have.  

With the advent of Digital I could really experiment and make progress. More than anything it was the cost of getting the photos developed and printed that was the issue. I'd shoot a roll of film over several months or maybe a year or so. Then send them off and a week or so later I could see the results. Then I'd flick through them, oh I just remember that day out or occasion, and then each shot, rubbish, rubbish, head cut off, overexposed, rubbish, rubbish, out of focus, this one's quite nice........... At one stage I bought a developer tank and black out bag. What a faddle that was, putting the camera in the bag, extracting the file by touch, putting it in the developer tank without spilling the chemical, waiting for the prescribed time and then taking out the developed roll and hanging it up to dry.

Digital is so superior. 

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I own a number of film cameras but realistically, much as I love them, I'm not sure if I'll ever get much use out of them again.

My last surge of interest was a happy period about 6+ years ago when large Tescos (as a loss-leader) would process/ scan to CD any size film for £1.99 during which I invested in a fancy negative scanner but alas! those days are now gone.

Thing is, I can't bring myself to flog the kit, especially my 1960s-70s half-frames and Japanese rangefinders

There is an undeniably unique quality to film which is difficult to achieve in digital but the faff and expense that is  currently involved requires more commitment than I am willing to invest.

 

 

Edited by Turned Out Nice Again

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I wonder if film will be the next big analogue revival once all the hipsters get bored with Vinyl? I've got dozens of film cameras that I don't use. Don't use my digital ones much either, to be fair.

Edit: I found my Contax G1 had just been plonked in a storage chest when my wife cleared it out yesterday. Fortunately it seems to have survived unscathed! 

Edited by Rave

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1 hour ago, Rave said:

I wonder if film will be the next big analogue revival once all the hipsters get bored with Vinyl? I've got dozens of film cameras that I don't use. Don't use my digital ones much either, to be fair.

Edit: I found my Contax G1 had just been plonked in a storage chest when my wife cleared it out yesterday. Fortunately it seems to have survived unscathed! 

I know someone with a record player and a cassette walkman, he also owns quite a few film cameras.

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Just now, Uptherebels said:

It's not superior. It's just cheaper. 

Whoa, whoa. Strong assertion.

With digital I can use the camera to change ISO at the flick of a switch, I can see the image immediately, enlarge it crop it. I can use all sorts of special effects to change the image in camera to black and white, sepia, saturate the colours.

How is film superior?

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I've still got two 35mm SLRs, and a twin lens 120 roll film camera. Don't use them these days. They'd be relatively low to mid budget stuff. Not worth selling even if there was a buyer. Pretty sure the top end stuff from 60s, 70s,and 80s is worth decent money. Especially lenses. 

1 minute ago, sleepwello'nights said:

Whoa, whoa. Strong assertion.

With digital I can use the camera to change ISO at the flick of a switch, I can see the image immediately, enlarge it crop it. I can use all sorts of special effects to change the image in camera to black and white, sepia, saturate the colours.

How is film superior?

Did I say film was superior? 

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45 minutes ago, Rare Bear said:

Funny, I had intended to start a thread on this as I was at an air show last weekend and was quite surprised to see a trader selling films.

Well for an air show, I think digital has advantages, like you can delete the pictures where you missed the plane.:CryBaby:

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2 hours ago, sleepwello'nights said:

Whoa, whoa. Strong assertion.

With digital I can use the camera to change ISO at the flick of a switch, I can see the image immediately, enlarge it crop it. I can use all sorts of special effects to change the image in camera to black and white, sepia, saturate the colours.

How is film superior?

The #1 advantage is exposure latitude since the dynamic range of film emulsions still exceeds the best digital sensors, even using RAW, meaning more information is retained in the highlights and shadows.

Arguably nicer grain. Arguably nicer colours.

The digital darkroom is definitely closing the gap but I think I would have been hard-pressed to get this (Olympus Trip 35mm) shot as nice even using my full-frame Nikon dSLR:

3698609263_cf91a6cc85_b.jpg

Edited by Turned Out Nice Again

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10 minutes ago, Turned Out Nice Again said:

The #1 advantage is exposure latitude since the dynamic range of film emulsions still exceeds the best digital sensors, even using RAW, meaning more information is retained in the highlights and shadows.

Arguably nicer grain. Arguably nicer colours.

The digital darkroom is closing the gap, however.

I'll bow to your superior technical knowledge and accept that that may well be the case. I can't tell the difference on a finished print, any differences I can detect are down to the quality of the printer not the image file. For me the sheer convenience and versatility of the digital camera makes it my choice

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5 hours ago, sleepwello'nights said:

 

So you think film is just as good as digital?

I do. 

I don't use it anymore though, even though I've still got the kit. I've just been away for a week, and taken 522 photos with a DSLR. Cheaper, easier etc etc. Better hit rate obviously. Took loads of pictures of a Buzzard in flight. Quick review of first couple, slight adjustment, then good exposure results on the rest. Makes it easier, but I use to enjoy it more with film. I may have more successful pictures these days, as in quantity, but I don't think they're better. I'll never get into using software, other than cropping. 

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Proper photography was quite an expensive task. You ended up with a bag of prints. Nowadays you can take hundreds of shots on a memory card, and nobody needs to see them. In fact I'll bet they will never be printed and will be lost.O.o

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37 minutes ago, MrPin said:

Proper photography was quite an expensive task. You ended up with a bag of prints. Nowadays you can take hundreds of shots on a memory card, and nobody needs to see them. In fact I'll bet they will never be printed and will be lost.O.o

Did anyone else have a darkroom?  I had one for years and am shocked looking back at old photos just how much kit I ended up with - all to produce some 'arty' prints of rocks or whatever.  Definitely was a hobby for those on 'the spectrum'.  I doubled down on my madness by starting a holographic studio that used a pulsed ruby laser to make 3D holograms of live subjects.  Caused myself a world of pain with that.  I'd just got it all working well and had orders coming in when Agfa - the only manufacturers of holographic film at the time - decided to cease production and left me with masses of completely useless (and unsellable) kit.  I made the move into computer based 3D graphics and manufactured 3D scanners instead (hence my username) which actually worked out for once.  I don't really mourn the passing of traditional film.

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l_10152822_003.jpg

I want to upgrade to one of these but for £400 will I get a return on this investment?

I am currently running with one of these, which is nearly 1080p. It does have a super powerful x75 optical zoom.

41p7Qpnkb1L._SX425_.jpg

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Mine cost a lot less than this, but it actually included a lens, you tight cunts!O.o

https://www.cameraworld.co.uk/used-nikon-f2-photomic-body.html?utm_source=google_shopping&gclid=EAIaIQobChMI7vqlg-bA1QIVBLftCh1DpATnEAQYASABEgLkHfD_BwE

It's still my film camera of choice! It's been half way round the world with me, and if anyone gets a bit "chirpy",I hit them with it, because it is hard.

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1 hour ago, Uptherebels said:

I do. 

I don't use it anymore though, even though I've still got the kit. I've just been away for a week, and taken 522 photos with a DSLR. Cheaper, easier etc etc. Better hit rate obviously. Took loads of pictures of a Buzzard in flight. Quick review of first couple, slight adjustment, then good exposure results on the rest. Makes it easier, but I use to enjoy it more with film. I may have more successful pictures these days, as in quantity, but I don't think they're better. I'll never get into using software, other than cropping. 

I know what you mean. It's weird but I'm just not attached to my digital kit in the way I was to the old black Canon AE-1 I had as an 18 yo - can't put my finger on why - perhaps it's more about being 18 and having your first serious camera. But all the deferred gratification and ritual (selecting film type, processing, contact sheets and physical prints) that went with film certainly added to the magic. I partially recaptured some of that with digital by pairing my modern kit with manual lenses and strobes from the 60s/70s/80s.

Edited by Turned Out Nice Again

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We all had serious cameras when young. It was a blokey rite of passage. But girls did it too. My GF had Canons, but as a Nikon man, there was no future in that relationship as we could not swap lenses.

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