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I find it amazing that we (our colony) landed on the moon (and returned!) in 1969;  just 24 years after the end of WWII.

Scale that onto the present and the war ended in 1996 - yesterday IMHO - and we landed on the moon this year.

Look at Britain at the end of the war (I know we didn't land on the moon but the lifestyle and technology was similar) as depicted in something like Dad's Army which would have been true to the period.

You've gone from Bakelite radios, cardboard gas mask boxes, and cars that look like antiques today to Saturn 5 in 24 years.

As I said: that's pretty bloody amazing.

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1 hour ago, sarahbell said:

The SDP breakaway from Labour in 1981 was closer to the Second World War than to the present day.

 

 

how old do you feel?

https://www.independent.co.uk/voices/the-top-10-timespan-quirks-a8200846.html

I was born closer in time to the Battle of the Somme than to 2020. In fact I was born closer to the seige of Mafeking than now. 

Edited by Virgil Caine
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13 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

I find it amazing that we (our colony) landed on the moon (and returned!) in 1969;  just 24 years after the end of WWII.

Scale that onto the present and the war ended in 1996 - yesterday IMHO - and we landed on the moon this year.

Look at Britain at the end of the war (I know we didn't land on the moon but the lifestyle and technology was similar) as depicted in something like Dad's Army which would have been true to the period.

You've gone from Bakelite radios, cardboard gas mask boxes, and cars that look like antiques today to Saturn 5 in 24 years.

As I said: that's pretty bloody amazing.

Yes, technology has advanced at a rapid and amazing pace.....scary even.

I fear though that the human brain is much slower to evolve and humanity has been thrown into turmoil trying to adjust to unprecedented technological advances in such a short time!

Edited by Van Lady
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2 hours ago, sarahbell said:

The SDP breakaway from Labour in 1981 was closer to the Second World War than to the present day.

 

 

how old do you feel?

https://www.independent.co.uk/voices/the-top-10-timespan-quirks-a8200846.html

Urggh. Makes me feel a real bone shaker.

Mind my house was built in 1904, 8 years before my late nan was born to this world.

That dosent make me feel old though. More of a temporary custodian of both house and country.

I am as close to WWII ending as the start of the first Gulf War. The latter seems like yesterday when my physics teacher called a halt to classes to discuss during one episode of that adventure to discuss. 

Referring to "The War" now means little to anyone younger than me without exacting which.

 

Edited by The Grey Man
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- At the beginning of WW2, the Germans and British were still using biplanes. By 1943 they were using jets and by 1944 the Germans were using rockets capable of reaching near-space.

- The Falklands War was closer to the Second World War in time, than we are now to the Falklands War.

- The Great Fire of London is less than four long lifetimes away from us.  A centenarian alive today could theoretically have met and spoken with (say at age five) another centenarian, who could have met at age five another centenarian, who would have been born in 1730 and who could easily have met someone who witnessed the Great Fire of London. (This is a concept I call 'living memory of living memory')

- Theoretically (whilst acting legally), a woman can become a mother at 17, a grandmother at 34, a great grandmother at 51, a great-great grandmother at 68, a great-great-great grandmother at 85, a great-great-great-great-grandmother at 102. Since the world's oldest woman lived to 123, in theory also it would be possible to be a great-great-great-great-great grandmother at 119.

- The first man made object to enter the stratosphere (near space) was in 1918 - it was a German shell from the enormous 'Paris Gun' used to shell the French capital.

Edited by Austin Allegro
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The first episode of the BBC comedy Dad's Army was broadcast 52 years ago in 1968.

That was just 23 years after the end of WW2. By today's standards that would mean the war ended in 1997.

The first episode begins with a Home Guard reunion of the platoon in 1968. By a strange twist it shows Private Walker (James Beck) who was the first and youngest member of the cast to die.

 

 

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2 hours ago, sarahbell said:

The SDP breakaway from Labour in 1981 was closer to the Second World War than to the present day.

 

 

how old do you feel?

https://www.independent.co.uk/voices/the-top-10-timespan-quirks-a8200846.html

There was another if those.

Back to future is further away from today (1985) 35 than they went back in time 1955, 30 years.

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11 minutes ago, Austin Allegro said:

The first episode of the BBC comedy Dad's Army was broadcast 52 years ago in 1968.

That was just 23 years after the end of WW2. By today's standards that would mean the war ended in 1997.

The first episode begins with a Home Guard reunion of the platoon in 1968. By a strange twist it shows Private Walker (James Beck) who was the first and youngest member of the cast to die.

 

 

I was 10 when Dad’s Army came on the telly. Bloody loved it. I can still watch episodes and laugh. Reminds me of a simpler world!

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The USA is actually an older country than the UK.

The USA came into being at the Treaty of Paris in 1783 but the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland did not come into being until 1922.

Even if one considers the original United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, that still post-dates the USA by 17 years.

Edited by Austin Allegro
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1 hour ago, Frank Hovis said:

I find it amazing that we (our colony) landed on the moon (and returned!) in 1969;  just 24 years after the end of WWII.

Scale that onto the present and the war ended in 1996 - yesterday IMHO - and we landed on the moon this year.

Look at Britain at the end of the war (I know we didn't land on the moon but the lifestyle and technology was similar) as depicted in something like Dad's Army which would have been true to the period.

You've gone from Bakelite radios, cardboard gas mask boxes, and cars that look like antiques today to Saturn 5 in 24 years.

As I said: that's pretty bloody amazing.

I think it's amazing going from the first Wright brothers flight in 1903 to landing on the moon 66 years later. 

(Or having the ability to fake the Moon landings, if that floats your boat)

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7 minutes ago, Austin Allegro said:

The USA is actually an older country than the UK.

The USA came into being at the Treaty of Paris in 1783 but the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland did not come into being until 1922.

Even if one considers the original United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, that still post-dates the USA by 17 years.

Alaska and Hawaii didn't join until 1959 so by that logic the USA didn't reach its final form until 1959.

It isn't purely about names.

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3 minutes ago, SomersetMatt said:

There has never been a war between 2 democracies! I think....

IIRC that was a Jeremy Clarkson claim on QI that war was declared upon Finland by the Allies and that was the only one.

The next episode trotted out half a dozen - mainly involving South American countries.

23 minutes ago, maynardgravy said:

there's only about 80 generations between us and Jesus Christ

 

Even if he never existed. 

Eighty sounds a lot.

Of course He existed.

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4 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

IIRC that was a Jeremy Clarkson claim on QI that war was declared upon Finland by the Allies and that was the only one.

The next episode trotted out half a dozen - mainly involving South American countries.

Eighty sounds a lot.

Of course He existed.

What South American democracies?? 

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