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In common with my views about astrology I think that dowsing rods do work but not for the reasons that people think they work. As someone with a (distant) backgroudn in archaeology it is usually

Over the years I have found a golf club and a golf ball an infallible way of finding water.

Just one of many examples of this being bunkum and poppycock: Kassel 1991 studyEdit A 1990 double-blind study[63][64][65] was undertaken in Kassel, Germany, under the direction of the Gesell

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Yes when I was a wee lad in Northern Ireland my mum gave me a silver birch wishbone branch and showed me how to hold it which is with the wrists in the opposite direction to if you were pushing a wheel barrow. I walked along and as I went over a culvert the thing went mental really pulling hard against my wrists. In my memory it was actually bending strongly. Due to the water in the culvert.

Then I explored dowsing a bit more with the Devon Dowsers. Using metal rods. They were right into the mythology of the Michael line, a lay line which allegedly goes through ancient sites and templar sites eg the chapel on top of Brent Tor and goes on to meet the sunrise point on midsummers day off the coast of Suffolk and terminates in Greece. ( I have an open mind been too busy to research this ) Any way there were various things in the area that dowsing rods reacted to fairly strongly for what ever reason.

Then I have a farmer friend who uses dowsing to find things if he has lost them.

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14 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

 

You also get plants that actively prefer disturbed ground such as nettles.

If something has been buried under the ground or water is running reasoanbly close to the surface then that will cause a change in the surface vegetation and also the surface itself.  A burial will leave a small hump, running water may give slight sinkage.

I learnt this from an episode of Dangerfield last week. 

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Yes, years ago and it does work, you just have to give it a go and persevere with it and comes down to the electric field and disturbances that are all around us, the conductivity of the human body and flemmings left hand rule twitching muscles and/or moving metal rods if you use them.

Archaeologists and Geophysicists use magnetometers to look under the ground and perhaps we can attune ourselves to do something similar.

Some people can allegedly do dowsing with a pendulum and a map, now that to me is totally different to sensing the earths electrical field and disturbances in it in the great outdoors.

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1 minute ago, Chewing Grass said:

Yes, years ago and it does work, you just have to give it a go and persevere with it and comes down to the electric field and disturbances that are all around us, the conductivity of the human body and flemmings left hand rule twitching muscles and/or moving metal rods if you use them.

Archaeologists and Geophysicists use magnetometers to look under the ground and perhaps we can attune ourselves to do something similar.

Some people can allegedly do dowsing with a pendulum and a map, now that to me is totally different to sensing the earths electrical field and disturbances in it in the great outdoors.

We have many "senses" that we've stopped using over the centuries. If birds can steer by the earth's magnetic field there's no reason we can't re-sensitise ourselves to it.

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1 hour ago, Great Guy said:

Anyone use them?

I've met a lot of people that have said they work....

 

they work, but specific situations ..

use copper L shaped rods rather than wood, if you use wood it must be green wood, I've never used wood.

it won't work to detect water in pipes.

Water must be flowing, won't detect static water.

doesn't work for everyone.

My Dad was taught how to do it, and used it to detect underground streams in Africa. Ideal for digging water wells. He was taught by a Catholic Priest.

There's nothing mysterious about it, but science ignores it. My theory is flowing water creates an electric field, the copper rods align with it similar to a magnet in electric field. Where we did it the soil was very high in iron, making the soil red. May be an important factor.

You need to hold the rods extremely softly to minimise friction to movement. Not working for everyone may be to do with dry or sweaty hands.

done correctly, a single rod can be used to indicate direction of flow, 2 rods crossing to indicate location. You can then map underground streams.

 

 

Edited by snaga
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40 minutes ago, Option5 said:

We have many "senses" that we've stopped using over the centuries. If birds can steer by the earth's magnetic field there's no reason we can't re-sensitise ourselves to it.

I agree with this.  We have abilities as part of our evolutionary past that aren't used (much) in modern life -- IMO dowsing rods are a way that we tune into a deeply buried ability to find water.

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1 hour ago, snaga said:

they work, but specific situations ..

use copper L shaped rods rather than wood, if you use wood it must be green wood, I've never used wood.

it won't work to detect water in pipes.

Water must be flowing, won't detect static water.

doesn't work for everyone.

My Dad was taught how to do it, and used it to detect underground streams in Africa. Ideal for digging water wells. He was taught by a Catholic Priest.

There's nothing mysterious about it, but science ignores it. My theory is flowing water creates an electric field, the copper rods align with it similar to a magnet in electric field. Where we did it the soil was very high in iron, making the soil red. May be an important factor.

You need to hold the rods extremely softly to minimise friction to movement. Not working for everyone may be to do with dry or sweaty hands.

done correctly, a single rod can be used to indicate direction of flow, 2 rods crossing to indicate location. You can then map underground streams.

 

 

Heard it helps to place the L shaped rods in plastic tubes so theres no physical contact with them ,

 My grandad was said to be good at it, using a Y shaped piece of wood, gripping two ends , it would flex down over a source of water, people got him in for well digging,

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2 hours ago, Frank Hovis said:

In common with my views about astrology I think that dowsing rods do work but not for the reasons that people think they work.

As someone with a (distant) backgroudn in archaeology it is usually the case that what is under the ground leaves traces upon the ground.  Here is a classic deserted medieval village.

N10588.jpg

 

You also get plants that actively prefer disturbed ground such as nettles.

If something has been buried under the ground or water is running reasoanbly close to the surface then that will cause a change in the surface vegetation and also the surface itself.  A burial will leave a small hump, running water may give slight sinkage.

Walk across a flat piece of land holding gentle rods and you will unconsciously bump them as the ground level dips or rises or vegetation changes; which will be where there is something below ground.

IMHO anyway.

 

 

Wow. Where is that?  They are (were) using the system whose name escapes me, where each person has a strip of land that they can use. I loved this stuff at school, the ways in which society has organised itself. 

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12 minutes ago, One percent said:

Wow. Where is that?  They are (were) using the system whose name escapes me, where each person has a strip of land that they can use. I loved this stuff at school, the ways in which society has organised itself. 

Somehwere I hadn't heard of in County Durham @The XYY Man

IIRC it's called open field or common field which is one massive field with the strips doled out annually amongst the villagers rather than anyone owning one; and with shared horse and plough.

This was a product of the "mid Saxon shuffle"; prior to this you had several farmsteads scattered around the parish farming their own land.  In c. 850 across a strip from Northumberland to Dorset the old farms were abandoned and people moved into a central planned village set amongst one big open field per village with characteristic ridge and furrow pattern; though with their own livestock penned behind their homes.

It continued until enclosure started in I think the late 14th and 15th centuries, in the wake of the black death and much increased wages for agricultural workers, where the lord of the manor, who had always owned all of it and took rents, saw that it was far more profitable to chuck everyone off and run sheep upon it with a single shepherd.

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have tried it and the rods do cross over for whatever reason, grandad was a farmer and used it to locate water 

always seem to find golf balls better if I'm holding an iron  

once had a street light that would go out when I walked past it until it was replaced, a bit spooky.

Edited by ashestoashes
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Picking peaches in Australia I worked with a couple of families who were following the harvests. The two brothers had bought a big plot in WA. They'd dowsed as much of it as they could before buying to check there was water. The farmer we were working for got them to survey his land as well.  I had a go with their rods - one of the kids showed me how they worked by walking over power cables which were laying on the ground (!).  It seemed pretty normal amongst farming families to put faith in it.

Closer to home I've used them on Baildon (Ilkley) moor around the stone circles up there. They move around alright - in the spaces between the stones they'll always move.  My home made rods are two bits from a coat hanger with the handles made from bic pen inserts - but handles not essential - they'll move around plenty on their own. Walking towards someone will make them cross or open.  Moving over bull rushes or open water will move them straight away.

I have not done any investigative work along the lines of exploring old foundations but can get my head around how it would work.  

Have explored pendulums a little. Can get them to swing clockwise/anticlockwise for yes/no. Have not done more pendulum dowsing than that.  How about you @sarahbell

 

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29 minutes ago, Happy Renting said:

Having never tried it, I am unlikely to, as I think it is complete bollocks.

Just one of many examples of this being bunkum and poppycock:

Kassel 1991 studyEdit

A 1990 double-blind study[63][64][65] was undertaken in Kassel, Germany, under the direction of the Gesellschaft zur Wissenschaftlichen Untersuchung von Parawissenschaften (Society for the Scientific Investigation of the Parasciences). James Randi offered a US$10,000 prize to any successful dowser. The three-day test of some 30 dowsers involved plastic pipes through which water flow could be controlled and directed. The pipes were buried 50 centimeters (19.7 in) under a level field, the position of each marked on the surface with a colored strip. The dowsers had to tell whether water was running through each pipe. All the dowsers signed a statement agreeing this was a fair test of their abilities and that they expected a 100 percent success rate. However, the results were no better than chance, thus no one was awarded the prize.

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