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yeah, I use that on my kids and they get mad. Then being a great dad I can say "See, you aren't bored any more.  Now you're angry"

Imposing boredom on ourselves might be healthy.  Modern life offers so many hyper-stimulating things - internet, porn, alcohol, sugar, stressful jobs, stock price tickers, etc. that probably hit a lot

Blair was and is a malevolent cunt of satanic proportions, it is of no great surprise that even Epstein never invited him to the island.

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7 hours ago, Roger_Mellie said:

I'm really, really bored. 

Cheer me up Dosbodians. 

Bored or depressed?

I’II certainly admit to boredom, in the last century, when on a rainy Sunday stuck indoors, every book in the house has been read, every board or card game played to death and only the Eastenders Omnibus on TV.

Since broadband internet speeds though I don’t think I’ve ever honestly been bored whilst being in a position to freely dispose of my time.

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In the end, it was the Sunday afternoons he couldn't cope with, and that terrible listlessness which starts to set in at about 2:55, when you know that you've had all the baths you can usefully have that day, that however hard you stare at any given paragraph in the papers you will never actually read it, or use the revolutionary new pruning technique it describes, and that as you stare at the clock the hands will move relentlessly on to four o'clock, and you will enter the long dark teatime of the soul

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I find a big clear out of books and replacing them with new purchases from charity shops is a big boost; when there is a shelf full of books that you want to read then you're not bored.

When it's "read, read, read but didn't finish as too turgid, read, read, reference book" then the the books merge into the bookshelf as furniture inofthemselves. 

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10 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

I find a big clear out of books and replacing them with new purchases from charity shops is a big boost; when there is a shelf full of books that you want to read then you're not bored.

When it's "read, read, read but didn't finish as too turgid, read, read, reference book" then the the books merge into the bookshelf as furniture inofthemselves. 

So first I find out that some wierdos on here have physical CDs and in some cases actual records, and now you're telling me people have books ? I don't think I've read a physical book in the last 5 years.

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2 minutes ago, goldbug9999 said:

So first I find out that some wierdos on here have physical CDs and in some cases actual records, and now you're telling me people have books ? I don't think I've read a physical book in the last 5 years.

I did try an E-reader - never let it be said I have a closed mind! - and didn't get on with it at all.  Horrible thing.

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4 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

I did try an E-reader - never let it be said I have a closed mind! - and didn't get on with it at all.  Horrible thing.

Can't stand the things Francis. I would rather hold a proper book with pages. Mind you I can't imagine accountants ever getting bored.

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The whole "IT Crowd" Mr @The Generation Game, is an appalling stereotype, of an industry I do know, for the benefit of the "beans" ie, them, the public. People are varied and have hobbies. Whether it's motor racing, football, or gardening, of even golf. It's something I mentioned earlier, about a group of people you actually know being totally misrepresented for entertainment purposes.

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Having  a deep aversion to boredom (cue electric shock machine in waiting room experiment) is meant to be connected with high creativity. The brain will do anything to find something to stimulate it. I quite like sitting still and doing nothing, however.

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10 minutes ago, MrPin said:

The whole "IT Crowd" Mr @The Generation Game, is an appalling stereotype, of an industry I do know, for the benefit of the "beans" ie, them, the public. People are varied and have hobbies. Whether it's motor racing, football, or gardening, of even golf. It's something I mentioned earlier, about a group of people you actually know being totally misrepresented for entertainment purposes.

Yes, always thought it was shockingly bad and written by people who knew nothing of the industry.

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1 minute ago, MrLibertyRedux said:

Yes, always thought it was shockingly bad and written by people who knew nothing of the industry.

Absolutely, but now somebody will tell me accountants are interesting. It's actually quite a mix who went into IT. You didn't need any particular background. Some I know I know were English or Geography graduates, not mathematicians, and certainly didn't do an IT degree. Different skills are required. Who wants an identikit team?

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11 minutes ago, MrPin said:

Absolutely, but now somebody will tell me accountants are interesting. It's actually quite a mix who went into IT. You didn't need any particular background. Some I know I know were English or Geography graduates, not mathematicians, and certainly didn't do an IT degree. Different skills are required. Who wants an identikit team?

Are you suggesting that Roy, Moss and Richmond (not including Jen in this) are identikit?

 

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23 minutes ago, Nippy said:

Having  a deep aversion to boredom (cue electric shock machine in waiting room experiment) is meant to be connected with high creativity. The brain will do anything to find something to stimulate it. I quite like sitting still and doing nothing, however.

As this is a boredom thread then that gives me licence to discourse upon the theme of boredom.

 

This is very much from a male / my perspective.  I think that women have a different experience of it.

 As a child I, like my friends, would often get bored.  Mostly this was in the teenage years when your parents had ceased to take responsibility for entertaining you through waking hours.  I particularly recall Sundays during the winter when the weather was bad.  Your books were read, your homework was done, your stamp collections assembled.  Nothing to do but to look out of the window and at the rain running down it waiting for lunch or dinner to break up the day.

That boredom, or fear of it, drove me to join clubs and societies, take up new things, talk to people, work hard at my books to go to an interesting college and read something interesting.  Those dreary dead hours produced far more for me through a wish to avoid them than did any amount of entertainment.

Teenagers these days however have a cornucopia of entertainment available on their screens at any time. They may become fatigued or jaded but the mind-numbing boredom of nothing to do is something they may only briefly experience when their battery runs out on the train.

Where then do they derive their drive to go out and do new things?  Maybe they don't.

 

Then there is the adult boredom; first tasted during student years.  This differs from the teenage boredom as you have far more freedom to shape your own life but the multiple possibilities themselves bring a state of ennui and retreat.  When you can do anything then doing nothing becomes an attractive option.

I heard of people who had dropped out of their degrees and of everything else.  Slumped in stinking and filthy shared houses numbing their boredom with weed and, when they could afford it, drink.  Rarely washing or shaving.

This was visualised beautifully (drugs excepted), IMHO, in Bottom of which I know that @JoeDavola is a fellow fan.  What do adult men actually do all day when they have no work, no hobbies and cannot afford to drink very often? Whilst it was painted comically they were generally in a state of despair.  In putting themselves into a position of no responsibilities or duties they had made themselves redundant and didn't know what to do with their waking hours. 

As an older person without much to do you can easily go for those things which temporarily relieve boredom - drive somewhere, mooch about, drive back - or turn to what is there as ever-present temptations to relieve boredom for adults: fags, drugs, and the bottle.

When I had a high pressure job with a lot of travel I used to try to get an hour, or failing that half an hour, sitting still in silence which served to clear my head and hugely reduce the stress I was under and made me perform much better in my job because my mind was clear rather than chattering away.

These days, now retired, such is not necessary but if I feel that I am in a mental rut I will go to bed early with the alarm set to give me about ten hours.  I will think, sleep, drift, think, and generally let my mind wander.  I have no concern about getting ten hours sleep and find that the best thinking happens in the latter hours when one is washing backwards and forwards between dreams and being half-awake.  I find that it acts as huge mental reset which takes me out of that rut, brings me back to being what I regard as "myself", and boosts my energy levels for days afterwards.

I know some people who couldn't do that.  No reading, no checking the phone.  Ten hours entirely in their own heads.   It's however very worth it if you can.

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2 hours ago, Sasquatch said:

In the end, it was the Sunday afternoons he couldn't cope with, and that terrible listlessness which starts to set in at about 2:55, when you know that you've had all the baths you can usefully have that day, that however hard you stare at any given paragraph in the papers you will never actually read it, or use the revolutionary new pruning technique it describes, and that as you stare at the clock the hands will move relentlessly on to four o'clock, and you will enter the long dark teatime of the soul

Exactly.

Douglas Adams grew up in an era which specialised in the subject

If you have not experienced an English Sunday before the early 1970s you do not know true boredom. Even now at some time on that day between 2.00 pm  and 7.00 pm that sense of the futility of existence descends on me. A time too late to start something new and only school/work etc to look forward to.


 

Edited by Virgil Caine
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12 minutes ago, Virgil Caine said:

Exactly.

Douglas Adams grew up in an era which specialised in the subject

If you have not experienced an English Sunday before the early 1970s you do not know true boredom. Even now at some time on that day between 2.00 pm  and 7.00 pm that sense of the futility of existence descends on me. A time too late to start something new and only school/work etc to look forward to.
 

 

Just that.

I'd say however that it ran on much later than the early 1970s.

Sunday afternoon boredom disappeared as a combination of Sunday afternoon pub opening ?92, freely available immersive video games initially on Spectrums - ?83, and daytime multi-channel TV - ?95. 

 

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