Jump to content
DOSBODS
  • Welcome to DOSBODS

     

    DOSBODS is free of any advertising.

    Ads are annoying, and - increasingly - advertising companies limit free speech online. DOSBODS Forums are completely free to use. Please create a free account to be able to access all the features of the DOSBODS community. It only takes 20 seconds!

     

Recommended Posts

All on the thread but it is as easy as can be.

The quality, or the quality of mine anyway, is very variable.

I'm not a cider drinker myself but if you are than Lidl and Aldi both do 4x440m 5% cider cans for the frankly bonkers price of £1.89 or 47p per can.

The homebrew costs me 35p a pint so as long as minimum alcohol pricing isn't in and if you like cider than it's not really worth bothering IMO.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Apart from the cost of the beer kit, your first brew can be as cheap as you dare.

For fermenting, the 5 gallon wine fermenters as sold in Wilkos are ideal. To be cheap, use any large plastic bin you have. Or use a metal bin with a strong bin liner.

For bottling, use Newcastle Brown bottles or sterilised milk bottles. If cheap, use 2 litre pep soda bottles. (Max of 3 brews per bottle. Summat to do with chemical leaching.)

If an all grain best of brew = 100, then a follow the instructions beer kit brew is, at best, 70.

Here's how to add 10 to 20 points to your beer kit:

Using a large stockpot and 2 litres of water, dissolve the 1kg of white sugar and the contents of the beer kit.

Bring to the boil and then simmer for 10 minutes. Follow the beer kit instructions from then on.

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, jm51 said:

Apart from the cost of the beer kit, your first brew can be as cheap as you dare.

For fermenting, the 5 gallon wine fermenters as sold in Wilkos are ideal. To be cheap, use any large plastic bin you have. Or use a metal bin with a strong bin liner.

For bottling, use Newcastle Brown bottles or sterilised milk bottles. If cheap, use 2 litre pep soda bottles. (Max of 3 brews per bottle. Summat to do with chemical leaching.)

If an all grain best of brew = 100, then a follow the instructions beer kit brew is, at best, 70.

Here's how to add 10 to 20 points to your beer kit:

Using a large stockpot and 2 litres of water, dissolve the 1kg of white sugar and the contents of the beer kit.

Bring to the boil and then simmer for 10 minutes. Follow the beer kit instructions from then on.

Interesting, is the simmering to make sure the sugar is fully dissolved or is there another reason? I'm wondering whether this would improve a kit that doesn't call for white sugar (in the kits I've used, everything apart from the yeast arrives as delicious malty goo in a couple of big tins).

Link to post
Share on other sites

Used to do the box kits but never progressed to anything more complicated.  We bought the better quality beer kits which at the time were all priced around £23.   Really good results all round.  One of the kits made was listed as coming out at 7.1%🤪.  ( Evil dog double IPA )

Never got round to successfully monitoring the actual percentage though using the hydrometer or fancy refractometer we picked up. 

Anyway 40 pints at 7.1% for £23 nae bad at all.

Some of the kits if you were bottling gave instructions to individually insert a tea spoon of sugar into each bottle which seemed a bit pointless when you could add all the sugar after decanting into the second bucket to filter from the dead yeast etc.  In my experience just be careful with adding sugar as some instructions seemed to ask for a lot and it turned way too carbonated and whilst no bottle exploded wasn't nice having each bottle fizz out.

Then you could always invest in a keg at a later date and carbonate with co2 etc.  Seemed to be the kind of thing you can do very cheaply but also progress as much as you'd like.

The cider tried I think twice, both from kit.. An elderflower and a normal Apple... Both not great and recently tried someones attempt at work who made amazing beer from kit but terrible cider.   So personally would only be doing beer kit in future unless I wanted to take it the whole way and press my own apples etc.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I’ll be honest I never got in with beer kits. For me I get stuck fermentation’s and homebrew twang!

I just use brew in a bag method with malted grain on the hob to get 10 litre batches. you’ll need a big pot. I did find that using an immersion chiller Improved clarity but the Wilko beer yeast is pretty good and clears well.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I spent some time in an actual brewery with a friend. Making beer from scratch as opposed to a kit is not as complex as I thought. Start with barley, allow it to germinate and create sugars. This is called malting and even breweries buy it ready malted. Boil it for an hour then do something called sparging which is like a sewage works sprinkler going round sprinkling over the boiled stuff. Then stick it in a big pot and cook some more and put yeast in. Then leave it for 2 or 3 weeks can't remember. That's basically it although the detail takes a lot of effort and knowledge for example there are dozens of types of yeast and the one you choose makes a big difference to the finished product. Aliexpress has semi-pro brewing equipment for cheap. Too much trouble for me though I just want to drink it.

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, sarahbell said:

So honey?

Which is what son suggested

Golden syrup seems to be invert sugar, or it seems easy to make by simmering as suggested up thread:

https://www.northernbrewer.com/blogs/beer-recipes-ingredients/how-to-make-invert-sugar

At first sight it seems a shame to waste honey on brewing unless you're specifically making mead. In fact you probably would be making a kind of mead, or at least a beer-mead hybrid.

On second thoughts, the result might be interesting :)

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, MrLibertyRedux said:

Something I'm going to have a go at when I get around to getting some kit. Going to have a go at beer and wine.

I haven't started yet as I haven't collected enough bottles...

I will increase my endeavours.

Start with wine. So much easier. You do have to wait longer for the results though sadly. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I picked this ginger beer recipe off a brewing forum some years ago. I grated the ginger when i made it, and bottled it in a mixture of 2 litre pop bottles and whatever other bottles I had lying about. An old flip top grolsch bottle worked best. Probably something to do with the coloured glass not letting as much light in.

This is the cheapest booze i can make that actually tastes nice. I tried turbo cider but I'm not a big cider drinker and didn't get on with it.

If you follow these instructions you never deactivate the yeast, so it'll keep fermenting and get a bit drier over time before it eventually goes off.

5 gallons water
1-1 1/2 lbs. ginger root, coarsely chopped
17 cups sugar
4 lemons, sliced
3/4 tsp. cream of tartar
1 packet champagne yeast
 
 
Boil as much of the water as will fit in your largest pot.
 
Squeeze in lemons and add squeezed bits.
 
Add ginger root and cream of tartar.
 
Add as much sugar as you can if there's room.
 
Simmer gently for 20-30 minutes.
 
Put remaining sugar, if any, in 5 gallon plastic pail or similar. 
 
Pour water mixture over.
 
Add remaining water to 5 gallons and cool to lukewarm.
 
Taste - this will approximate the taste of the finished product. If necessary add more ginger or ginger powder.
 
Dissolve yeast in a cup of the mixture, then stir it back in.
Cover and ferment for 7 days at 65-70�F.
 
Siphon into sterilised bottles (I use 2-litre pop bottles). Cap. Age upright for one week at 60-65�F then store in cool place at 60�F or less.
 
If necessary release pressure in bottles occasionally to prevent explosions! Take care when opening bottles - can be very lively!!
 
Drink as is (will be 5-7% alc. by volume). Is also very good, but deadly, mixer for gin on a hot summer's day.
Link to post
Share on other sites
28 minutes ago, Sucralose Ray Leonard said:

Start with wine. So much easier. You do have to wait longer for the results though sadly. 

Yes, that is the plan. Several friends who brew suggested the same so I thought I'd start with a wine kit and see how I get on.

I've already read through the brewing thread and there are some good tips in there too.

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, MrLibertyRedux said:

Yes, that is the plan. Several friends who brew suggested the same so I thought I'd start with a wine kit and see how I get on.

I've already read through the brewing thread and there are some good tips in there too.

I wouldn't even bother with a kit for wine. In next couple of weeks it's Elderberry time. If you like a Port style wine, (sweet) then these are perfect. 

Or you could even buy a bag of frozen fruit, strawberrys or blueberrys etc. 

Have a look for a recipe. The prep really is simple. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Up to the limits of the yeast, more sugar = more alcohol.

I used to add an extra pound of sugar to my beer kits.

The downside is that the body of the beer is weaker. We're used to stronger brews having more body. It would taste like a weak beer when in fact one pint could have you fail a breathalyser.

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Sucralose Ray Leonard said:

I wouldn't even bother with a kit for wine. In next couple of weeks it's Elderberry time. If you like a Port style wine, (sweet) then these are perfect. 

Or you could even buy a bag of frozen fruit, strawberrys or blueberrys etc. 

Have a look for a recipe. The prep really is simple. 

I've got the CJ Berry book First Steps in Winemaking

I've made a few from there. 

I don't drink very much "wine" 

Link to post
Share on other sites
21 hours ago, Frank Hovis said:

All on the thread but it is as easy as can be.

The quality, or the quality of mine anyway, is very variable.

I'm not a cider drinker myself but if you are than Lidl and Aldi both do 4x440m 5% cider cans for the frankly bonkers price of £1.89 or 47p per can.

The homebrew costs me 35p a pint so as long as minimum alcohol pricing isn't in and if you like cider than it's not really worth bothering IMO.

 

I've mentioned this before but I use home grown or foraged fruit/veg to make 'prison wine' which if you add soda to make a sort of spritzer or fruit beer, works out around 5p a pint.

Link to post
Share on other sites
23 minutes ago, Stuey said:

Given how often even professional brewers and cellar keepers (the more important bit) get it wrong I'll stick to paying £2 a pint at the Thomas Sheraton or £3.20 at the Smog...

 

Keep it simple and stick to a tried and trusted recipe and not much can go wrong. Most mistakes are made by newbies. In all the years I've been making prison wine I've only had one 'bad' batch and that was still drinkable if used as a mixer. Most wrong 'uns never get made because they have a stuck fermentation (home brewing equivalent of a miscarriage).

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...