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http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4776362/Ferret-30-feral-cats-live-bungalow-filled-poo.html

'The conditions in the house were horrific - there was so much animal faeces which in some parts of the bungalow were waist-high and completely embedded in surfaces.

'There was literally nowhere else for the animals to relieve themselves and they had resorted to defecating on the tops of wardrobes and kitchen surfaces.

:Sick1:

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I used to do co-responder shouts for the fire service.

Some of the houses we entered were so rank that we had to take it in two minute shifts otherwise there was a real danger of puking all over the place.

Not that you'd have noticed of course.

I also know some people who work in an HA in Blackpool, some of the stories they could tell you would make you boak. I'd want a hazmat suit do do half of their jobs.

 

That house above is unbelievable though. I think you'd have to knock it down.

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53 minutes ago, ccc said:

Is that an Italian dance music cd I can see poking out of the turds ? ....:D

It's definitely someone else with the cat magnet super power - I'm a bit envious but wouldn't swap my x-ray vision for it.

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It was his mother's house who had died.  After she died he put two cats in there who bred and then kept visiting to "throw" in food.

So it was like a big cat kennel but he never lived there or even spent any time with the cats. 

Why would he do this?  You wouldn't do this if you like cats and, conversely, you wouldn't do this if you don't like cats.  Weirdo.

 

The worst one for which I saw the pictures was a council tenant in Camborne or Redruth whose flush toilet had broken but they didn't report it (which any normal person would do and it would be fixed, for free, within hours as a priority repair) but kept using it anyway; backing as far into the toilet as they could each time until they were standing outside the door. 

 

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The point being missed in this story is that the person in the house is clearly sufffering some major life crisis - depression, a physical ailment, a mental health problem, unable to cope due to aging.

I have not read the article but when you see things like this it is often due to someone facing a crisis, having no one to turn to and simply slipping through the so-called NHS and social care safety net.

Again, and I know that I sound like a stuck record here, but this is probably someone who has worked most of their life, paid into the system and then, when help was needed, it was not forthcoming. How many of the people organising welcome hampers for islamic migrants and getting them into housing are even aware that the UK is full of British-born people who have slipped through the net.

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1 minute ago, The Masked Tulip said:

The point being missed in this story is that the person in the house is clearly sufffering some major life crisis - depression, a physical ailment, a mental health problem, unable to cope due to aging.

I have not read the article but when you see things like this it is often due to someone facing a crisis, having no one to turn to and simply slipping through the so-called NHS and social care safety net.

Again, and I know that I sound like a stuck record here, but this is probably someone who has worked most of their life, paid into the system and then, when help was needed, it was not forthcoming. How many of the people organising welcome hampers for islamic migrants and getting them into housing are even aware that the UK is full of British-born people who have slipped through the net.

Nobody was living in the house.

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1 minute ago, The Masked Tulip said:

The point being missed in this story is that the person in the house is clearly sufffering some major life crisis - depression, a physical ailment, a mental health problem, unable to cope due to aging.

I have not read the article but when you see things like this it is often due to someone facing a crisis, having no one to turn to and simply slipping through the so-called NHS and social care safety net.

Again, and I know that I sound like a stuck record here, but this is probably someone who has worked most of their life, paid into the system and then, when help was needed, it was not forthcoming. How many of the people organising welcome hampers for islamic migrants and getting them into housing are even aware that the UK is full of British-born people who have slipped through the net.

I used to watch a lot of those programmes on hoarders eg Life Of Grime , plus some family members aren't too many rungs down the ladder from this. The common factor I always noticed is loss and/or an inability to move on from their past. A lot of them lived with their parent(s) well into later life and then the parent died and they set it up as a shrine to the past, which then gets out of hand.

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Just now, spunko2010 said:

I used to watch a lot of those programmes on hoarders eg Life Of Grime , plus some family members aren't too many rungs down the ladder from this. The common factor I always noticed is loss and/or an inability to move on from their past. A lot of them lived with their parent(s) well into later life and then the parent died and they set it up as a shrine to the past, which then gets out of hand.

 

I saw it with my own Mum towards the end of her life. Things are memories. They are a way of holding on to those that people have lost. They are a way of holding on to life as the realisation that someone's own life is nearing the end. Things represent a life.

But it gets out of control and people end up collecting newspapers, crisp packets, etc - all neatly folded and stacked - in order to somehow let the universe that they exist and that they were around.

Yes, you are right - it usually happens after the loss of a parent, partner or child.

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3 minutes ago, The Masked Tulip said:

 

I know. I saw your post just as I posted. But I am going to stick to my rant :D

I agree with your rant.  Last year I helped somebody doing the door knocking for non-responds on the voting register.  It was a real eye opener where people lived, wooden shacks down lanes that you thought were adandoned paths.  I was along as security as a favour as a lone woman knocking on a door of an isolated shack in the middle of the nowhere is not the most safe thing in the world.

She had some terrible stories of the conditions in which peopel were living; all old, on their own and poor so reliant upon adult social care which had been so stripped to the bone it was doing the absolute minimum.  One old lady had a bladder problem and was pretty immobile; the house stank of it but all the help she got was somebody popping in to change her dressings then straight off again. 

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3 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

I agree with your rant.  Last year I helped somebody doing the door knocking for non-responds on the voting register.  It was a real eye opener where people lived, wooden shacks down lanes that you thought were adandoned paths.  I was along as security as a favour as a lone woman knocking on a door of an isolated shack in the middle of the nowhere is not the most safe thing in the world.

She had some terrible stories of the conditions in which peopel were living; all old, on their own and poor so reliant upon adult social care which had been so stripped to the bone it was doing the absolute minimum.  One old lady had a bladder problem and was pretty immobile; the house stank of it but all the help she got was somebody popping in to change her dressings then straight off again. 

 

Yep, and the vast majority of the 'do-gooders' never see such things, and would probably argue till they are blue in the face that such things do not exist, whilst, as I saw recently, putting up posters for a 'cycle right for grenfell towers' posters in Mumbles.

Even if you can make people aware of the poor here in the UK - in their own towns - they would blame... Trump, Capitalism, Tories, etc, etc, and would seemingly be incapable of linking vast numbers of people flooding into the UK from Africa and the Middle East with there not being enough money for that elderly lady.

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1 minute ago, The Masked Tulip said:

 

Yep, and the vast majority of the 'do-gooders' never see such things, and would probably argue till they are blue in the face that such things do not exist, whilst, as I saw recently, putting up posters for a 'cycle right for grenfell towers' posters in Mumbles.

Even if you can make people aware of the poor here in the UK - in their own towns - they would blame... Trump, Capitalism, Tories, etc, etc, and would seemingly be incapable of linking vast numbers of people flooding into the UK from Africa and the Middle East with there not being enough money for that elderly lady.

And I think they just don't care.

The perfect example for me was Lynn Barber.  Right on journalist who:
 

Quote

 

After being deeply affected by stories of migrants Lynn Barber decided to help 

Syrian mother trying to hold her baby above the waves was her 'tipping point'

She allowed married Sudanese asylum seeker to move into her London home

 

 

That they were a total fraud was funny, though she got a story out of it, but the main point is that she lives in London and there are hundreds of desperate homeless people there that she will walk past and take no notice of them because they are white and British.  Don't care, fuck 'em, their own fault, get a job.  Whereas a "Sudanese asylum seeker" - ker-ching - oh you poor dear, have a room, have food, have money.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4560498/Woman-took-refugee-kindness-thrown-face.html

 

 

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8 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

She had some terrible stories of the conditions in which peopel were living; all old, on their own and poor so reliant upon adult social care which had been so stripped to the bone it was doing the absolute minimum.  One old lady had a bladder problem and was pretty immobile; the house stank of it but all the help she got was somebody popping in to change her dressings then straight off again. 

I was watching "The Old People's Home for 4 Year Olds" last night and it seemed like the old people even in the most luxurious nursing home have lives somewhere between utterly joyless and chronically depressed. How much worse must it be for the very poor and abandoned.

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1 minute ago, Hail the Tripod said:

I was watching "The Old People's Home for 4 Year Olds" last night and it seemed like the old people even in the most luxurious nursing home have lives somewhere between utterly joyless and chronically depressed. How much worse must it be for the very poor and abandoned.

If you are chronically ill then you would have that life but if you are basically fit but too frail to live on your own any more then I don't see why your life in one of these has to be bad.

Sure you can't go kite surfing but you can read books, go for short walks, do bird watching out of the window, play cards with the other residents, put on a Christmas show and so on.  Life remains what you make it even at an advanced age.

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3 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

And I think they just don't care.

The perfect example for me was Lynn Barber.  Right on journalist who:
 

 

That they were a total fraud was funny, though she got a story out of it, but the main point is that she lives in London and there are hundreds of desperate homeless people there that she will walk past and take no notice of them because they are white and British.  Don't care, fuck 'em, their own fault, get a job.  Whereas a "Sudanese asylum seeker" - ker-ching - oh you poor dear, have a room, have food, have money.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4560498/Woman-took-refugee-kindness-thrown-face.html

 

 

 

I made a simple observation a week or so back that all the homeless people begging in Swansea are white but that the local council estates have a new and big influx of people where the ladies of the family wear head to toe black sheets. Most of the people I mentioned this too looked at me as if I was the most vvilest person on planet for even suggesting it.

I agree with you - they don't care if they can't virtue signal. They don't like things pointed out to them.

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5 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

If you are chronically ill then you would have that life but if you are basically fit but too frail to live on your own any more then I don't see why your life in one of these has to be bad.

Sure you can't go kite surfing but you can read books, go for short walks, do bird watching out of the window, play cards with the other residents, put on a Christmas show and so on.  Life remains what you make it even at an advanced age.

I think you might find that some staff would view you as a work creating troublemaker.

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:)

Watching some of those "Obsessive Compulsive Cleaners" programmes (they're quite fun, that woman who uses a bottle of bleach a day has me in hysterics), you quickly realise that what the person the programme is about (often, a serial hoarder) actually needs is psychological help and not a cleaner.

They are and always were quite capable of cleaning the house themselves, but did not do so. The reason why they did not do so, is the thing that needs exploring. "Clean" the house and before long it will be back the way that it was, because the actual issue has not been addressed.

And, in just about every case, the reason for the hoarding behaviour is loss, usually of their spouse. The still-ongoing pain of that is written all over their faces.

Edited by DTMark

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5 minutes ago, DTMark said:

:)

Watching some of those "Obsessive Compulsive Cleaners" programmes (they're quite fun, that woman who uses a bottle of bleach a day has me in hysterics), you quickly realise that what the person the programme is about (often, a serial hoarder) actually needs is psychological help and not a cleaner.

They are and always were quite capable of cleaning the house themselves, but did not do so. The reason why they did not do so, is the thing that needs exploring. "Clean" the house and before long it will be back the way that it was, because the actual issue has not been addressed.

And, in just about every case, the reason for the hoarding behaviour is loss, usually of their spouse. The still-ongoing pain of that is written all over their faces.

What I don't understand is how hoarders can take it so far without apparently realising. You mention OCD Cleaners, I have often wondered if I'm not far off that level of obsessiveness - although I've never bothered to go for a diagnosis - I do like things lined up and my home is always spotless, spending at least 30 minutes a day cleaning. But I am acutely aware that if I were to spend an hour a day cleaning, it would progress to 2 hours, 4 hours, etc. I have the awareness that it could easily scale, and get out of proportion, but why don't some people have that? Always wondered.

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Yes generally Mark it is exactly that, the state of the house is the external symptom of an internal problem.  There was a programme that had a therapist with a Greek name who worked with them and solved the internal problem, rather than just throwing everything away.

One exception I do remember is two blokes sharing a small house in Ipswich. The owner was a long distance lorry driver and the other guy was a previously homeless bloke who was his friend.  Just friends who got on very well.

They both liked watching the telly, getting pissed at home or down the pub, and eating takeaways. They seemed perfectly happy and had zero interest in the house which had whole areas of exposed brickwork where the plaster had fallen off.

They seemed perfectly happy to live there until it fell down and the cleaners descending was an unwelcome intrusion which they accepted with good grace.

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1 minute ago, Frank Hovis said:

Yes generally Mark it is exactly that, the state of the house is the external symptom of an internal problem.  There was a programme that had a therapist with a Greek name who worked with them and solved the internal problem, rather than just throwing everything away.

One exception I do remember is two blokes sharing a small house in Ipswich. The owner was a long distance lorry driver and the other guy was a previously homeless bloke who was his friend.  Just friends who got on very well.

They both liked watching the telly, getting pissed at home or down the pub, and eating takeaways. They seemed perfectly happy and had zero interest in the house which had whole areas of exposed brickwork where the plaster had fallen off.

They seemed perfectly happy to live there until it fell down and the cleaners descending was an unwelcome intrusion which they accepted with good grace.

I remember that one! - funny, my interpretation of it was they were fucking slobs locked in Manchild syndrome in perpetuity and were just too bone idle to clean up. xD

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1 minute ago, spunko2010 said:

What I don't understand is how hoarders can take it so far without apparently realising. You mention OCD Cleaners, I have often wondered if I'm not far off that level of obsessiveness - although I've never bothered to go for a diagnosis - I do like things lined up and my home is always spotless, spending at least 30 minutes a day cleaning. But I am acutely aware that if I were to spend an hour a day cleaning, it would progress to 2 hours, 4 hours, etc. I have the awareness that it could easily scale, and get out of proportion, but why don't some people have that? Always wondered.

It's a spectrum and we all think we're perfect (well I do anyway!).

I know several people who to varying degrees just like buying things and "bagging a bargain" on eBay where they will be bidding on several auctions at any one time. Not only do they not need 90% of this stuff but they don't appear to even want most of it based upon the piles of unopened purchases I see behind settees and beside armchairs in their houses.

I could do more cleaning, I'm rather too reactive and don't do things until I notice that they need doing. A routine would be better.

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