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Here come the shysters!


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Is the company with a 20-second coronavirus test for real?

iAbra touted Heathrow as its ‘launch customer’ but doubts arise over the technology

https://www.ft.com/content/e7a279df-3239-4e00-be29-f38d98f4d730


The “Virolens” test was unveiled last week by an obscure British tech company called iAbra. People take a simple mouth swab, which is dropped into a black box. Inside the box — iAbra says — is a digital camera attached to a microscope that can examine the sample and see if it contains any Covid-19 virus. It displays the answer within seconds.



The Virolens test is “based on microscopic holographic imaging and artificial intelligence (AI) software technology”, according to iAbra, which is a highly specialised field of structural biology. The company says the technology “uses a digital camera attached to a microscope to analyse saliva samples, with the data run through a computer which is trained to identify the virus from other cells”.

 

H,, no bitcoins.

https://virolens.keyoptions.com/

 

https://www.business-live.co.uk/manufacturing/major-investment-electronics-firm-set-18913794

 

If it doenst work will I be able to put it in my fuel tank and get 100mpg?

 

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Smells like bullshit, the virus isn't another type of cell, you could argue that maybe you could see the effects on some cells but that effect would be more generic would have thought. Plus only read the peter day of first pictures of virus under electron microscopes digital camera / microscope to see the actual virus, a no again.

The company says the technology “uses a digital camera attached to a microscope to analyse saliva samples, with the data run through a computer which is trained to identify the virus from other cells”.

 

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25 minutes ago, dgul said:

What gets me is that it fails the sniff test from about a mile away, but serious companies spend significant money investigating, if not actually deploying.

 

Or spending not a lot of money in a pretence of doing something and the ability to throw hands up in the air and say oh well we tried, government give us some more money.

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Lets have a looky at CEOs linkedin:

 

Lead Architect

i-abra

Feb 2011 – Present9 years 8 months

Providing strategic technology leadership for HPC PaaS vendor and service provider

Senior ISP Systems Consultant

Synetrix

Feb 2009 – Feb 20112 years 1 month

Farnborough Hampshire

ISP services technology leadership for internal and external customers delivering scale out solutions in fixed and wireless L7+ web filtering+caching, domain services, identity provision and web hosting+streaming

Various

Tiscali

2006 – 20093 years

 

 

Soooooo .... its a PaaS, run by someone who thinks hes running an ISP.

A more cynical person would think its some bunch of idiots whove bought some moonbeam BS off a Chinese scammer.

You cant argue with the balance sheet:

https://companycheck.co.uk/company/05206429/I-ABRA-LIMITED/companies-house-data

 

Nature of business (SIC)

62090 Other information technology service activities - Software development and marketing.

 

I like Shane Tingeys linked in. Does he mean 0 to 20m, or sales between 0m-20m?

https://uk.linkedin.com/in/shane-tingey-76802745

An expert in the Aviation sector, I have exceptionally broad business and aviation experience having worked for Rolls Royce, Britannia Airways, Goodrich and Airbus amongst others. A tangible enthusiasm for the aviation sector is balanced with core senior management skills and fundamental understanding of business development on a global scale.

A natural entrepreneur and trouble shooter, I gravitate towards roles where change, improvement and growth are on the agenda. I enjoy exploring and developing new opportunities, overcoming obstacles and recognising with accuracy (so far!) the Joint Ventures and Acquisitions that will work to transform an organisation.

Notable career accomplishments include setting up and developing a new, aviation sector businesses achieving sales of $0-$23m in under 3 years; setting up numerous JVs in Asia; developing great contacts in the Middle East and securing major repair contracts with key Airline Operators.

Hired to provide leadership and direction, my strengths lie in managing people, improving relationships, driving sales and developing businesses in existing, emerging and new markets. With an up-to-date awareness of the Aviation sector internationally and extremely knowledgeable in the areas of commercial aircraft MRO, aviation material sales and repairs, I am able to provide effective, workable solutions to a range of complex issues.

 

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iAbra seems an unlikely company to deliver such a product. Mr Compton, who grew up in Bedfordshire and left school aged 17, said he was “always a computer kid”, and wrote his first computer program aged seven.

He had several IT jobs, first at Italian telecoms company Tiscali, then at Capita and BSkyB, but never any formal training.

He said he came up with the idea for the Covid-19 testing technology while standing at Dubai airport with his sister.

None of the other employees has any expertise in viruses or microscopy, though one has a PhD in physics.

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https://www.eenewseurope.com/news/production-starts-20s-covid-19-test

TT Electronics has started production of a Covid-19 test system that can produce a result in just 20s at Hartlepool in a £2m deal

A Covid-19 test system that delivers a result in seconds rather than hours or days has been developed in UK and is entering production

An initial £2m deal with TT Electronics will see the Virolens system developed jointly with iAbra made at the TT plant in Hartlepool, UK.

Rather than analysing DNA, the Virolens system uses a 'holographic' microscope and imaging machine learning algorithms to identify the shape of the virus in saliva. Like PCR systems from DNAnudge and Bosch, it uses a cartridge system, but delivers a result in 20s rather than 45 minutes. 

Current medical imaging systems have a resolution down to 120nm, the size of a Covid-19 virus. A 4K resolution imaging system in Virolens is used to identify individual Covid-19 viruses in a sample using an AI inference model trained with virus samples from the University of Bristol. The inference engine and image processing algorithms run on an Intel processor.

“This is a significant step forward in the battle against COVID-19, much of which has revolved around our inability to keep society moving with the constant background threat of infection,” said Greg Compton, CEO of iAbra, a neural networking image analysis startup founded in Bedfordshire, UK, in 2010. “Our system allows simple, high speed, reliable and low-cost testing in dynamic environments. In short, with the Virolens system, we can get the world moving again.”

Internal testing of the system has shown 99.8% sensitivity and 96.7% specificity. It has also been trialled at London Heathrow Airport, but the system would need further trials to demonstrate its accuracy and effectiveness.

As the exclusive manufacturing partner, TT Electronics has custom parts in the design, and expects that the deal could be worth up to £280m. “Providing critical products and services to support life-saving and other essential technology, including medical applications, lies at the heart of what TT does,” said Richard Tyson, CEO of TT Electronics. “Virolens has the potential to be a

 

Lets assume the system works. The market is going to be quite a bit bigger than '280m' FFS.

 

Here's the DNAnudge, the competitor, Im led to believe.

https://www.dnanudge.com/

 

The DnaBand. Choose a colour combination and wear your digital DNA. Your own DNA can now be your guide every time you shop, nudging you towards healthier choices.

 

 

??????????

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16 minutes ago, Melchett said:

So ridiculous I wonder how the fuck they are not falling foul of the very real regulations on developing, verifying, validating and gaining approval to market medical diagnostic devices and ending up in prison for fraud to boot.

Perhaps it has ‘Michael Green’ on the board of directors?

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12 minutes ago, onlyme said:

Well that makes more sense, you would use a self learning / pattern recognition system nowadays, not sure about the optical resolution, maybe doable.  TT Group not fly by nights either, mixed engineering company over all sorts of sectors.

Viruses are not optically visible. You need an electron microscope, a high voltage power supply to run it, a huge room to stick it in and a day or two to prepare your samples in most cases.

Edited by Melchett
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I looked into this last night.

I think they’ve read:

Particle-Aggregation Based Virus Sensor Using Deep Learning and Lensless Digital Holography

Yichen Wu, A. Ray, +5 authors A. Ozcan

Published 2019

2019 Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics (CLEO)

Or

https://innovate.ee.ucla.edu/wp-content/uploads/2010/03/Lensless-Microscopy-Ozcan-Group-Methods-2017.pdf

 

You can overcome the diffraction limit using holography.

 

Edited by Transistor Man
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With automated pattern matching you wouldn't necessarily be able to see what you think you would need to see, there may be enough resolving of shapes into certain patterns for the pattern matcher to differentiate between infected / non infected cells or virus particles say. It could even be heavily buried in noise and if set up right could just work because there is a differences difference that our vision/interpretation just wouldn't spot.

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19 minutes ago, Transistor Man said:

@onlyme I am also very sceptical this method would work in reality. Resolving SARS-CoV-2 from other coronaviruses? I am doubtful. 

 

Exactly. Even if it "works" there could be a million and one other things aggregating in that mucky sample that give a similar  signal and a whole slew of other (corona or other) viruses  that give the same signal.  I'd want to know what known samples they tested of other things to be convinced otherwise.

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3 hours ago, Melchett said:

Viruses are not optically visible. You need an electron microscope, a high voltage power supply to run it, a huge room to stick it in and a day or two to prepare your samples in most cases.

All theyve got to do is train the computer t look for these:

GettyImages-1200706447-crop.jpg

Dead fucking easy - those pointy out bits are red. I can see 4 viruses right there.

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, Transistor Man said:

@onlyme I am also very sceptical this method would work in reality. Resolving SARS-CoV-2 from other coronaviruses? I am doubtful. 

 

 

1 hour ago, Melchett said:

Exactly. Even if it "works" there could be a million and one other things aggregating in that mucky sample that give a similar  signal and a whole slew of other (corona or other) viruses  that give the same signal.  I'd want to know what known samples they tested of other things to be convinced otherwise.

 

Agree to both, but I've seen these algorithms do weird and wonderful things in the most unexpected ways and that was 30 years ago, if they have some verified data on selectivity then they may just have done it.

I've also seen the same tech do absolutely dumb stuff too to be fair, well it did what the data told it to do but the data was crap. Absolutely must use very good and extensive data that covers all the bases to get anything meaningful out.

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1 minute ago, unregistered_guest said:

I had a computer with that much RAM in it too...

 

...about 40 years ago!

I've just bought a new home esxi host.

Not really pushing it - small nuc, for a handful of vms for clients.

16g ram.

When I first worked for one of the clients, as an employee, in the late 90s, my work computer had 32m.

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4 minutes ago, spygirl said:

I've just bought a new home esxi host.

Not really pushing it - small nuc, for a handful of vms for clients.

16g ram.

When I first worked for one of the clients, as an employee, in the late 90s, my work computer had 32m.

Used to run neural net training algorithms on a screamingly fast Compaq dx2/66, alternative was a VAX but that would hardly have been quicker.

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32 minutes ago, onlyme said:

Used to run neural net training algorithms on a screamingly fast Compaq dx2/66, alternative was a VAX but that would hardly have been quicker.

My Aha! moment in software was in 1993.

The org I was working on had spent several 100k updating a vax cluster, which was used for development n finance.

The build of some software  - not huge, transcompiling about 100k of z80, took 40min.

We had some sparc boxes for other stuff, which was good.

We spent some leftover budget on a tank-like box - stupid slow,  looking back- 66mhz 486, 100m disk, about 4m of ram. It cost 3k/4k - about 150 times cheaper than the vax.

We put a version of bsdi on - this was about time of the att settlement/Jolitz Byte port.

A v early Linux was about but rough as fuck.

We cross compiled the z80s stuff in 5m.

At that point I knew the days of hierarchy large firms was over.

Edited by spygirl
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