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Broadband Jammer


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https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-54239180?at_medium=custom7&at_custom3=BBC+News&at_custom4=05630A40-FCB4-11EA-888B-87B296E8478F&at_custom2=facebook_page&at_campaign=64&at_custom1=[post+type]

The mystery of why an entire village lost its broadband every morning at 7am was solved when engineers discovered an old television was to blame.

An unnamed householder in Aberhosan, Powys, was unaware the old set would emit a signal which would interfere with the entire village's broadband.

After 18 months engineers began an investigation after a cable replacement programme failed to fix the issue.

The embarrassed householder promised not to use the television again.

---

410ab3b3fb69d657d244ba5a8f4590bb.jpg

^The humble CRT TV could jam broadband?!

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Engineers walked around the village with a monitor called a spectrum analyser to try to find any "electrical noise" to help pinpoint the problem.

"At 7am, like clockwork, it happened," said Mr Jones.

"Our device picked up a large burst of electrical interference in the village.

"It turned out that at 7am every morning the occupant would switch on their old TV which would, in turn, knock out broadband for the entire village."

The TV was found to be emitting a single high-level impulse noise (SHINE), which causes electrical interference in other devices.

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1 hour ago, 201p said:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-54239180?at_medium=custom7&at_custom3=BBC+News&at_custom4=05630A40-FCB4-11EA-888B-87B296E8478F&at_custom2=facebook_page&at_campaign=64&at_custom1=[post+type]

The mystery of why an entire village lost its broadband every morning at 7am was solved when engineers discovered an old television was to blame.

An unnamed householder in Aberhosan, Powys, was unaware the old set would emit a signal which would interfere with the entire village's broadband.

After 18 months engineers began an investigation after a cable replacement programme failed to fix the issue.

The embarrassed householder promised not to use the television again.

---

410ab3b3fb69d657d244ba5a8f4590bb.jpg

^The humble CRT TV could jam broadband?!

I have that exact TV in my pile of junk, it needs a new CRT but that shouldn't stop it :D

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1 hour ago, 201p said:

Engineers walked around the village with a monitor called a spectrum analyser to try to find any "electrical noise" to help pinpoint the problem.

"At 7am, like clockwork, it happened," said Mr Jones.

"Our device picked up a large burst of electrical interference in the village.

"It turned out that at 7am every morning the occupant would switch on their old TV which would, in turn, knock out broadband for the entire village."

The TV was found to be emitting a single high-level impulse noise (SHINE), which causes electrical interference in other devices.

This sounds like what the Telly Tax inspectors pretended to do in the 80s. I hope they had a decorative oversized satellite dish on top of their van too.

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Quote

Retired GP receptionist Elaine Rees said: 'One morning during lockdown at around 8.30am we could hear two men outside talking about signal strength.

'We looked out of the window and saw they were BT engineers holding some kind of meters. One of them was pointing at our front door.

'Next thing they're knocking the door and asking us to turn the telly off at the wall.'

Mrs Rees went on to explain: 'I love watching Piers Morgan in the mornings.'

 

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2 hours ago, 201p said:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-54239180?at_medium=custom7&at_custom3=BBC+News&at_custom4=05630A40-FCB4-11EA-888B-87B296E8478F&at_custom2=facebook_page&at_campaign=64&at_custom1=[post+type]

The mystery of why an entire village lost its broadband every morning at 7am was solved when engineers discovered an old television was to blame.

An unnamed householder in Aberhosan, Powys, was unaware the old set would emit a signal which would interfere with the entire village's broadband.

After 18 months engineers began an investigation after a cable replacement programme failed to fix the issue.

The embarrassed householder promised not to use the television again.

---

410ab3b3fb69d657d244ba5a8f4590bb.jpg

^The humble CRT TV could jam broadband?!

That looks..from long memory...like the Fergusson model my late father would buy. Same one. Year in. Year out.

Black and white version.

The only TV I saw set itself onfire when I came back from school and switched it on.

Those screens really live up to the gold fish bowl look.

Screens so flat now they almost boast being concave.

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10 hours ago, spunko said:

This sounds like what the Telly Tax inspectors pretended to do in the 80s. I hope they had a decorative oversized satellite dish on top of their van too.

Well that's exactly what they did. modern  LED screens emit little electrical noise.

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“The TV was found to be emitting a single high-level impulse noise (SHINE), which causes electrical interference in other devices.”

what’s the physics? Ok so I get digital freeview interference from chips / mobiles but that is local. But how can a CRT Tv emit over wide area range ? Does the interference  go back up into the aerial and transmit ?

or is it the bt equipment / engineers rubbish ?

Edited by Ash4781b
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50 minutes ago, Ash4781b said:

“The TV was found to be emitting a single high-level impulse noise (SHINE), which causes electrical interference in other devices.”

what’s the physics? Ok so I get digital freeview interference from chips / mobiles but that is local. But how can a CRT Tv emit over wide area range ? Does the interference  go back up into the aerial and transmit ?

or is it the bt equipment / engineers rubbish ?

Maybe the house with the death Ray TV was right next to the phone junction box? 

 

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12 hours ago, spunko said:

This sounds like what the Telly Tax inspectors pretended to do in the 80s. I hope they had a decorative oversized satellite dish on top of their van too.

It's a myth that they couldn't detect teles. Back when it was administered by the GPO, so going back a while, my dad did it. I even got a ride in the van. Which was pretty cool. Must have been one of these:

 

BLW_TV_Detector_Van.jpg

Edited by Roger_Mellie
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5 hours ago, Ash4781b said:

“The TV was found to be emitting a single high-level impulse noise (SHINE), which causes electrical interference in other devices.”

what’s the physics? Ok so I get digital freeview interference from chips / mobiles but that is local. But how can a CRT Tv emit over wide area range ? Does the interference  go back up into the aerial and transmit ?

or is it the bt equipment / engineers rubbish ?

Pretty sure, it’s nothing to do with the TV local oscillator or RF.

It was a big, noisy electrical current spike on tv switch-on, which was getting coupled onto the phone line. 

Edited by Transistor Man
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19 hours ago, 201p said:

An unnamed householder in Aberhosan, Powys, was unaware the old set would emit a signal which would interfere with the entire village's broadband.

really? if the photo is in-situ then that looks like a electronic enthusiast's workbench, why would someone turn such a TV on at 7am? for what use was it really being used?

 

 

Edited by snaga
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44 minutes ago, snaga said:

really? if the photo is in-situ then that looks like a electronic enthusiast's workbench, why would someone turn such a TV on at 7am? for what use was it really being used?

 

 

They've probably used a stock photo of a CRT TV, why bother doing any actual proper reporting?

The article also deliberately fails to mention WiFi, because a lot of people think that "WiFi" IS the internet, so my gut instinct is telling me there's more to this story, and the BBC are as usual reporting half of it.
At the bottom of the page they suggest using equipment that meets modern standards, but the standards in that respect have barely changed in decades.

Not only this, but the TV is in no way connected to the phone line, it's almost completely electrically isolated aside from it's earth connection and if the earth connection was carrying noise, then the problem is not the TV but the electrical installation of the entire village.

If the problem was EMI, then the TV was simply positioned to close to something like the phone or had a phone line running past/near to it.

Edited by Snark
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6 hours ago, sam1994 said:

But the link you shared appears to be from Facebook, based on the google analytics data in the query string.

Ah........... but my use of FB use is virtuous (i.e. Stolen Car Group), not virtue signalling :)

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21 hours ago, spunko said:

This sounds like what the Telly Tax inspectors pretended to do in the 80s. I hope they had a decorative oversized satellite dish on top of their van too.

Telly Tax inspectors was bollocks. 

Spectrum Analysers are pretty cool and expensive. Have a read on TEMPEST is is amazing what you can pick up from emissions if you really want too

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