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Best outdoor paint


Question

Question to all,  in case we have any experts..

I have to paint a load of outdoor stuff that’s starting to look a bit tired.  Plastic down pipes,  wooden shed etc.

Is it me,  or is all paint:

1). Expensive 

2). Water based 

3).  Not very good

I feel that for things like plastic piping I should be using something that stinks to high heaven and coats like a rock.

For wood..  something that penetrates a bit and doesn’t just peel off like a layer of PVA glue after a year or two.

Am I doing it wrong..  is is that just the standard of paint these days?

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No. Eu directives ensures that it’s all shite.  Go for professional stuff, not ‘professional’ from the diy sheds but proper professional.  I use this internally which seems pretty good. 

https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B00OKCWT30/ref=ox_sc_saved_title_2?smid=A1D8KIFGI9PTVE&psc=1

maybe look for their external range 

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On 04/10/2020 at 15:36, Libspero said:

Question to all,  in case we have any experts..

I have to paint a load of outdoor stuff that’s starting to look a bit tired.  Plastic down pipes,  wooden shed etc.

Is it me,  or is all paint:

1). Expensive 

2). Water based 

3).  Not very good

I feel that for things like plastic piping I should be using something that stinks to high heaven and coats like a rock.

For wood..  something that penetrates a bit and doesn’t just peel off like a layer of PVA glue after a year or two.

Am I doing it wrong..  is is that just the standard of paint these days?

Paint chemistry is one area I can claim to know a bit about on DOSBODS...for plastic piping/PVC use a solvent based acrylic coating (albeit make sure manufacturer states compatible with PVC) .

And I'd agree water based is crap, typically packed full of constituents trying to offset the crapness relative to an equivalent solvent based system.

Vast majority of wood coatings on the market are simply not that effective - we were very active in all the nasty stuff back in the day and incidentally we're still cleaning up our site from years of (mis)handling creosote, anthracene, naphthalene, coal tar blends and all other other manners of effective but nasty wood treatments. Stuff we produce today (nastiest allowable being creocote) is simply "not as good".

Edited by SillyBilly
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Very little sticks to PVC piping and guttering in outdoor conditions, it might even be cheaper to replace the PVC, good paint is so expensive. There is stuff you can treat PVC with to make paint bind to it but I don't know if it's any good. It's actually called Humbrol 'Makes Paint Stick' so I imagine the product is aimed at undscriminating or retarded people.

Wilco do a water-based outdoor paint for general use that seems durable.

I usually stain wood, but then I have many disgusting habits.

One thing I avoid is vinyl paint where other plastics are involved, as the plasticiser in the paint can damage other plastics.

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2 minutes ago, Libspero said:

Down pipes disappear into concrete and look a bit of a pain to get out, otherwise I would.  I think the previous owner “slapped some paint on” to make it pretty for selling the house..  now it’s peeling off and looks untidy.  I’ve sanded it down,  but not sure what best to prevent me having to repeat the whole process again in two years time.

Flexacryl. Does the job and stinks to high heaven. 

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26 minutes ago, Sucralose Ray Leonard said:

Flexacryl. Does the job and stinks to high heaven. 

Used something similar I think - anyway a upvc /guttering specifically paint and worked. Was extremely liquid though to put on and cleaning.prep needs to be pretty good to ensure a decent finish and longvity.

Osmo finishes are stunning for wood but also eye wateringly expensive. If time is more precious than the money then a good one to use.

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25 minutes ago, Happy Renting said:

Very little sticks to PVC piping and guttering in outdoor conditions, it might even be cheaper to replace the PVC, good paint is so expensive. There is stuff you can treat PVC with to make paint bind to it but I don't know if it's any good. It's actually called Humbrol 'Makes Paint Stick' so I imagine the product is aimed at undscriminating or retarded people.

Wilco do a water-based outdoor paint for general use that seems durable.

I usually stain wood, but then I have many disgusting habits.

One thing I avoid is vinyl paint where other plastics are involved, as the plasticiser in the paint can damage other plastics.

As said before, replacing them is probably better.   But the concrete is a complication - you'd be looking at breaking that open to disconnect the next joint under the ground.
Also, if it's a 4" soil pipe, (i.e connected to a bog), and you're not confident, its got the potential to be one of those DIY episodes your whole family talks about at parties for a long, long time.

Sometimes you just have to paint some plastic.  I'd have another look at your sanding handywork.  Hope all the old paint is gone, AND you've proper scratched up the plastic pipe.  If it looks smooth anywhere, like the original plastic surface, do it some more with some 40 grit.
Clean it off with a rag soaked in meths, turps, or something like that.
Then, you want a good primer.  I'd use Zinsser Bin Primer, (cos I've usually got some and it sticks pretty good to things like that).  
Then, gloss paint of your choice.
 

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Just look at the tin of Exterior Gloss and see if its VOC content is HIGH, it it is it is good shit.

This should do you - other colours are available, as ever if the substrate is dubious use a primer.

https://www.screwfix.com/p/leyland-trade-high-gloss-paint-black-750ml/98165#product_additional_details_container

 

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1 hour ago, spunko said:

Are you trying to preserve the wood colour, enhance it, stain it? Needs more detail...

In terms of paint rather than stain, I find that Johnstone's is very good. Just make sure you get the oil based not the resin based.

The shed is a bit of a story.   When we moved in it was just a shed,  and a lot of the outer panelling was well past its best.   I replaced all of the outer panelling (and refelted the roof) putting in a couple of windows to turn it in to more of a summerhouse.

I painted all of the outer timber with Dulex Weathersheen thinking “good brand,  seems to be the main sort of thing they are selling for this”.

looked great,  but now it is starting to peel off, especially on edges and detailing.. completely exposing the wood underneath.   I spent an hour this afternoon retouching all the cracks,  but I don’t imagine it will last all that long and it will probably only be another 5 years before I’m replacing all the outer timber again.

If there is something I can paint over it with that will last better, that would be great.  If not,  when I next start from scratch.. what should I use that will last a bit better and actually stick/bond to the wood?

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1 hour ago, One percent said:

No. Eu directives ensures that it’s all shite.  Go for professional stuff, not ‘professional’ from the diy sheds but proper professional.  I use this internally which seems pretty good. 

https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B00OKCWT30/ref=ox_sc_saved_title_2?smid=A1D8KIFGI9PTVE&psc=1

maybe look for their external range 

Why don’t i get a tick for this?   How does the tick system work?  Is it all nepotism and currying favours?   o.O

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2 hours ago, Sucralose Ray Leonard said:

Flexacryl. Does the job and stinks to high heaven. 

Seems to be a roof sealing compound.. am I looking at the right thing?    Gets rave reviews,  but all from people doing roofs,  not pipes.. will it stick to plastic ok? 

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21 minutes ago, Libspero said:

Seems to be a roof sealing compound.. am I looking at the right thing?    Gets rave reviews,  but all from people doing roofs,  not pipes.. will it stick to plastic ok? 

Sticks to anything. Not for you if you want a smooth finish as it contains small fibres that make a waterproof barrier. I've used it on a flat roof and to coat the joints on downpipes and the like. 

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3 hours ago, One percent said:

I use this internally

I don't think you are meant to do that !

Painters talk about TSP a lot for getting a good bond on old surfaces and MSP(multi surface paint) if you don't know what you are painting over eg acrylic over oil-based doen't work. It seems MSP is recommended by Dulux for uPVC else a primer might be needed.

 

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DIY creosote........car oil from your next oil change, then mix it with some white spirit...

Wood treatment, especially natural Oak, 50/50 linseed oil and white spirit.....dirt cheap too

Years ago I was conned into treating some wooden floors with stain and varnish....it looked ok for a while then....

the linseed approach is miles better and it looks 'natural'

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7 hours ago, 5min OCD speculator said:

Wood treatment, especially natural Oak, 50/50 linseed oil and white spirit.....dirt cheap too
Years ago I was conned into treating some wooden floors with stain and varnish....it looked ok for a while then....
the linseed approach is miles better and it looks 'natural'

Boiled linseed, I presume?

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On 04/10/2020 at 18:01, Libspero said:

I had a feeling the good stuff had probably all been banned.

BREEAM looked into this and came to the conclusion that modern water-based acrylic (basicly, a paint on plastic) paint lasted longer than high VOC oil-based paint on external wood, and therefore protected it better. I half remember it was something to do with its flexibility so it didn't crack during expansion and contraction. If oil-based didn't crack, it would be the more durable and longer lasting.

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41 minutes ago, Nippy said:

I half remember it was something to do with its flexibility so it didn't crack during expansion and contraction. If oil-based didn't crack, it would be the more durable and longer lasting.

Interesting, and I’m sure you’re right.

Ironic then that the problem I’m having with the modern water based acrylic paint is it cracking and peeling :/

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