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There's no defined theme here; more how classical has fed into pop either directly or through adapting.  Anything interesting really.

Most people know that The Farm's "No Man's Land" lifted the chord sequence form Pachelbel's Canon, that the horn section in "Since Yesterday" by Strawberry Switchblade is directly lifted out of Sibelius's 5th symphony.

 

"Could it Be Magic" - Barry Manliow, covered by Take That, is a speeded up version of a Chopin Prelude - it gets more recognisable as it goes on:

 

I also see a big parallel between The Cure's "All Cats are Grey" and  Handel's "Zadok the Priest" with their extended repetitive introduction building small variations before crashing into the lyrics.

 

 

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7 minutes ago, The XYY Man said:

I believe both of these songs are based on melodies by Bach.

 

 

 

 

Perhaps Frank can confirm this, as I haven't got a fucking clue...

 

XYY

@Frank Hovis

 

 

Cheers, I didn't know either of those.

 

The first clearly is in the vocal melody. 

I can well believe that the Beach Boys song is also but I wouldn't have picked up upon it.

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24 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

 

Cheers, I didn't know either of those.

 

The first clearly is in the vocal melody. 

I can well believe that the Beach Boys song is also but I wouldn't have picked up upon it.

I'm not sure why I remembered those two songs as being based on classical melodies, as I'm not into classical music at all - but then many a pub quiz team that I've been a member of over the years have asked me "where did you pull that fucker from Andy...?"

My brain just soaks shit like that up. Mind, I did have a girlfriend called Linda when Lady Lynda was in the charts...!

But anyway, from Wikipedia: The first song was based on the Minuet in G major - and the second one was influenced by Jesu, Joy of Man's Desiring. Both written by J.S. Bach...

 

 

 

XYY

Edited by The XYY Man
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3 minutes ago, The XYY Man said:

I'm not sure why I remembered those two songs as being based on classical melodies as I'm not into classical music at all - but then many pub quiz team I've been a member of over the years have asked me "where did you pull that fucker from Andy...?"

My brain just soaks shit like that up. Mind, I did have a girlfriend called Linda when Lady Lynda was in the charts...!

But anyway, from Wikipedia: The first song was based on the Minuet in G major - and the second one was influenced by Jesu, Joy of Man's Desiring. Both written by J.S. Bach...

 

 

 

XYY

 

I'm glad I started this thread; I'm learning things here.

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21 minutes ago, The XYY Man said:

:)

What, even from a fucking Philistine like me...!!!

;)

 

XYY

 

Whatever impression I may give I know ten times more about pop music than classical music where I regard myself as a novice.

That's not false modesty; when I speak to someone who knows their stuff and talks about a beautiful key change in Das Rheingold I feel like a chimpanzee going "Oook ook" and rocking back and forth with a portable radio when I like a tune.

What has happened is that any knowledge of classical music has started to disappear amongst the general public meaning that someone who can recognise Beethoven's fifth has become regarded as an expert. 

Similarly with Latin.  My knowledge of Latin is laughably poor but because most people now know nothing beyond veni vidi vici they are impressed by a phrase like alea iacta est (the die is cast) when they really shouldn't be.

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When the LSO and RPO toured their 'Classic Rock' and what was it 'hooked on classics' the reverse happened.

Rehearsals were play it like you would a section of this or that, even though they had scores and some of the players were right pisstakers in recognising chord patterns. What does one keep in a double violin case, one violin, cut glass tumblers and a bottle of whiskey.  I must be really bored sharing shit like this, but it was fascinating to listen as the conductor bought a full orchestra, rock band in the middle and 300 choir into order using classical musical terms.

 

 

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Trance - the dance genre that got going in the early to mid 1990s and continues to this day - at times incorporated classical music alongside electronica. For example..

 

This one doesn't incorporate any known classical tunes, but is in the same vein and the artist could be described as trance's "Mozart". Stunningly beautiful electronica packed with emotion.

 

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On 13/10/2020 at 14:56, Roger_Mellie said:

Bill Bailey has a lot to say about Bach. Ski Sunday theme is Bach. 

 

Funny clever bloke. I particularly like his Andrew Lloyd Weber piss take in the style of (Bless them) Chas'n'Dave.

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On 12/10/2020 at 19:42, Frank Hovis said:

 

Whatever impression I may give I know ten times more about pop music than classical music where I regard myself as a novice.

That's not false modesty; when I speak to someone who knows their stuff and talks about a beautiful key change in Das Rheingold I feel like a chimpanzee going "Oook ook" and rocking back and forth with a portable radio when I like a tune.

What has happened is that any knowledge of classical music has started to disappear amongst the general public meaning that someone who can recognise Beethoven's fifth has become regarded as an expert. 

Similarly with Latin.  My knowledge of Latin is laughably poor but because most people now know nothing beyond veni vidi vici they are impressed by a phrase like alea iacta est (the die is cast) when they really shouldn't be.

Ah, but come now. In any episode of University Challenge when the answer is an English composer it's basically one of three. If it isn't and it's sodding miserable it's probably Mahler. If it sounds quite tech and posh it's Silbelius and if it's downright sinister it's Shostakovic.

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On 12/10/2020 at 18:42, Frank Hovis said:

What has happened is that any knowledge of classical music has started to disappear amongst the general public meaning that someone who can recognise Beethoven's fifth has become regarded as an expert. 

Anyone else remember the first movement of Mozart's 40th Symphony being in the UK charts?

Not a few bars incorporated into a pop song but a chunky symphonic excerpt, maybe the entire movement? (looking back that seems unlikely).

Then who could forget the Wombles mining the same seam with Minuetto Allegretto? Try as I might, I can't :D

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