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Thermally Disregulated Burds On The School Run


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Just back from my morning 'walk to working from home.' I was a bit hot in my rugby top and fleece, so I took the fleece off half way round. Which was about the time I became aware that all the women out walking, presumably to and from school drop offs, were dressed in either those walking quilt coats plus woolly hats or parkas with the hoods up, in both cases fully zipped up.

Are they not hot? I was feeling almost clammy from the warmth and humidity today. Has the human race been quietly body snatched by alien lizard people who cant thermoregulate their bodies? How can they stand to be that wrapped up on a warm day? And how the fuck do they cope when it gets proper cold?

Edited by Melchett
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maybe you've got the virus, did you try and lick or sniff the women to see if your senses have been affected ?

Our sensation of 'temperature' isn't fixed, but is relative to what we have experienced recently. These women will have come out of a house with central heating turned on.  The relative temperatu

Our sensation of 'temperature' isn't fixed, but is relative to what we have experienced recently.

These women will have come out of a house with central heating turned on.  The relative temperature difference between their house's temperature and the outside world would tell them that they need a coat.  If they'd lived in a shack without central heating then they'd probably consider it to be rather mild outside.

IMO we'd all be better off if we spent more time at ambient temperatures -- apart from the very coldest months 'the outside' in the UK is pretty compatible with the European* human's thermoregulatory system.

[I have a suspicion that Europeans* have an annual cycle driven by things like temperature and light -- modern man has disrupted those signals through central heating and electric lighting and this then results in some health issues.  Eg, it would make sense for human dietary impulses to be driven by 'what's needed next'; if we're constantly in 'early autumn' then you'd imagine that the body would constantly be getting ready for winter...]

[* because of the Neanderthal genes]

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1 hour ago, Melchett said:

Which was about the time I became aware that all the women out walking, presumably to and from school drop offs, were dressed in either those walking quilt coats plus woolly hats or parkas with the hoods up, in both cases fully zipped up.

Are they not hot?

Wimmin only get hot once they are over 45, the ones you saw were well under that age and therefore cold and in the need of warming up.

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1 hour ago, ashestoashes said:

maybe you've got the virus, did you try and lick or sniff the women to see if your senses have been affected ?

Ah! So that's why Joe Biden sniffs those young girls?

And here's me thinking he was just a pervy old bastard. 

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3 hours ago, dgul said:

Our sensation of 'temperature' isn't fixed, but is relative to what we have experienced recently.

These women will have come out of a house with central heating turned on.  The relative temperature difference between their house's temperature and the outside world would tell them that they need a coat.  If they'd lived in a shack without central heating then they'd probably consider it to be rather mild outside.

IMO we'd all be better off if we spent more time at ambient temperatures -- apart from the very coldest months 'the outside' in the UK is pretty compatible with the European* human's thermoregulatory system.

[I have a suspicion that Europeans* have an annual cycle driven by things like temperature and light -- modern man has disrupted those signals through central heating and electric lighting and this then results in some health issues.  Eg, it would make sense for human dietary impulses to be driven by 'what's needed next'; if we're constantly in 'early autumn' then you'd imagine that the body would constantly be getting ready for winter...]

[* because of the Neanderthal genes]

 

That's answered a question that has always bugged me.

I will be out walking in September in shorts and a polo shirt and see many people dressed similarly to me.

Some may have longs on or a long sleeved top but one layer or maybe a light jacket for its pockets is pretty much the rule.

Then I will see the odd person dressed as described above - longs, gloves, scarf, puffa jacket with hood up.

And the question was: "What on earth do these people wear in the depths of winter?"

And the answer per your post is: the same.

 

I definitely agree about relative temperature.  Prior to getting a dehumidifier my house, I don't put the heating on a timer, would be the same temperature as the outside when I came in out of a warm car so I would whack the heating straight on.  The dehumidifier however raised the house temperature a few degrees above the ambient temperature and it feels so much nicer to come home to that and I would tend to grab a jumper instead. 

 

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1 minute ago, Option5 said:

My Norwegian colleagues wear far heavier clothing than I do in winter.

One asked me why Brits don't just  wear appropriate clothing for the weather like Norwegians do. I told him that the UK weather is so unpredictable you'd have to take your wardrobe with you every time you left the house.

I always wore less than my Swiss colleagues in Switz on evenings out: light jacket or no jacket when they would be in puffas or ski jackets.

Cold snaps aside the temperature was near as damnit the same that I'd left in the Midlands where I didn't look underdressed.

It could be that you can see the snow on the mountains which makes you feel cold or maybe that people liked getting full use out of their expensive ski jackets. 

@swiss_democracy_for_all will be advise upon Swiss fashion

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26 minutes ago, Option5 said:

My Norwegian colleagues wear far heavier clothing than I do in winter.

One asked me why Brits don't just  wear appropriate clothing for the weather like Norwegians do. I told him that the UK weather is so unpredictable you'd have to take your wardrobe with you every time you left the house.

What is 'appropriate clothing for the weather'?

I'd say that 'appropriate' at the moment would be trousers and a t-shirt.  It is rather mild and you don't need more than that.  Our evolutionary background didn't include vast amounts of clothing, and I'd have thought that humans in the UK 10,000 years ago wouldn't be wearing multiple layers of leather and furs on a day like today.

I've no idea what Norwegians would wear in this weather.  

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4 hours ago, dgul said:

IMO we'd all be better off if we spent more time at ambient temperatures -- apart from the very coldest months 'the outside' in the UK is pretty compatible with the European* human's thermoregulatory system.
 

It would be one way for people to shed some weight as humans burn more calories when cold. I wonder if the reason people were slimmer decades ago was simply because most did not live in a centrally heated environment. It should be noted that our ancestors routinely wore more layers of clothes than we do.

Edited by Virgil Caine
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29 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

I always wore less than my Swiss colleagues in Switz on evenings out: light jacket or no jacket when they would be in puffas or ski jackets.

Cold snaps aside the temperature was near as damnit the same that I'd left in the Midlands where I didn't look underdressed.

It could be that you can see the snow on the mountains which makes you feel cold or maybe that people liked getting full use out of their expensive ski jackets. 

@swiss_democracy_for_all will be advise upon Swiss fashion

Haven't noticed Geneva types dressing excessively. 

For me, if I'm physically active, I'm warm, if I am not active, I need quite warm clothes, I've always been like that. If I want to get into properly cold water, I have to physically warm up first, and I don't like the first snowboard run on a really cold day, everything hurts at first. I suspect this is a sign of poor circulation and a hint that I will not live to be very old.

So my guess is that these people who wear what looks like excessive clothing are permanently very physically inactive.

 

 

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5 minutes ago, dgul said:

What is 'appropriate clothing for the weather'?

I'd say that 'appropriate' at the moment would be trousers and a t-shirt.  It is rather mild and you don't need more than that.  Our evolutionary background didn't include vast amounts of clothing, and I'd have thought that humans in the UK 10,000 years ago wouldn't be wearing multiple layers of leather and furs on a day like today.

I've no idea what Norwegians would wear in this weather.  

Depends how long you are going out for too. I quite often drop off or pick up the kids, which involves standing outside a pool for 10 minutes, and i’ll quite often be in a jeans and t-shirt, while most others seem to be dressed for a polar expedition.

If I was going to be out for two hours I would be wearing a jumper and jacket, but stepping out of the air conditioned car for 10 minutes I wouldn’t.

I quite like being a bit too cold, because usually i’m way too hot. At the office, or shopping malls, and even at home now I’m married, the ambient temperature is set a bit too warm. So getting a little burst of too cold is actually quite pleasing.

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1 minute ago, Hail the Tripod said:

Depends how long you are going out for too. I quite often drop off or pick up the kids, which involves standing outside a pool for 10 minutes, and i’ll quite often be in a jeans and t-shirt, while most others seem to be dressed for a polar expedition.

If I was going to be out for two hours I would be wearing a jumper and jacket, but stepping out of the air conditioned car for 10 minutes I wouldn’t.

I quite like being a bit too cold, because usually i’m way too hot. At the office, or shopping malls, and even at home now I’m married, the ambient temperature is set a bit too warm. So getting a little burst of too cold is actually quite pleasing.

I had that a couple of nights last week; I was sat there cold and decided to embrace it as it would probably boost the immune system or something.

You shouldn't always be comfortable.

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3 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

I had that a couple of nights last week; I was sat there cold and decided to embrace it as it would probably boost the immune system or something.

You shouldn't always be comfortable.

Hormesis is such a broadly applicable phenomenon, and yet as far as I can tell nobody really understands it.

Lol, even the safari dictionary is flagging it as a misspelling.

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With school runs, there tends to be an unspoken rule of 'Thou Shalt Not Dress Up'. (Mothers going straight to work after dropping off the sprog get a pass.)

If it's warm enough, they'll wear sweats and a T shirt. If it's too cool for that, rather than change from their PJs or manky house sweats and fit for the bin T shirt, they'll throw on a big coat.

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Here it is 12 degrees. I have just returned from an electric bike ride where my face felt very cold.

I then walked a few hundred yards up a slight hill to post a letter, still wearing my heavy cycling clothes. When I got back I was boiling hot.

So it all depends on how active you are.

Looking at old photographs from 1900 onwards, it is obvious that the old folk wore far more clothes than we do.

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