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Frank Hovis

Breaking into keyless cars

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How are they doing this then?  The story is lacking in detail.
 

Quote

 

A Newquay woman has warned others after learning that thieves in Cornwall are using new equipment to gain entry into keyless cars.

Lucille Helene Cox took to Facebook after her car was burgled while parked on her front drive on Friday (August 18).

She said it would have been difficult to know the car had been broken into if the thieves hadn't stolen items because they locked the vehicle again afterwards.

Writing on Facebook, Lucille said: "Just want to warn people that someone is going round Newquay and breaking into keyless cars.

"We had our car broken into last night on the drive and the only reason we know it was broken into was our dash cam and a pair of designer sunglasses are missing and all compartments inside the car were open.

"The car was locked back up after they had been through it.

"We contacted the police and they advised us that criminals have now got the equipment to open and close and even start keyless cars! Our car is a Ford."

Commenting on the post, another woman wrote: "Even worse don't leave your car keys near a front door as this gadget will allow them to remotely start your car. Saw it on a morning to program a few weeks ago."


 

 

http://www.cornwalllive.com/newquay-woman-shares-warning-over-thieves-using-equipment-to-open-keyless-cars/story-30488599-detail/story.html

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10 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

I'm also not sure what they mean by keyless.  I sit those card things or does it include blippers that I have on my ignition key?

My keyless works by just touching the door handle with the keys in your pocket, get in, press the start button and you are away!

 

 

Edited by XswampyX

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1 minute ago, XswampyX said:

My keyless works by just touching the door handle with the keys in your pocket, get in, press the start button and you are away!

 

If it's just those then I can relax.

Those are in my "don't want" list along with electronic handbrakes and those setting selecter screens.

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24 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

How are they doing this then?  The story is lacking in detail.

Had a quick look and it seems they are using some kind of repeater one for the car and another for the fob (key). I imagine they put one through your letterbox and the other by your car and then both the car & the fob think they are in the same place and the car opens and starts.

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1 hour ago, Frank Hovis said:

If it's just those then I can relax.

Those are in my "don't want" list along with electronic handbrakes and those setting selecter screens.

Exactly. I want a shifter, and a stop and go pedal.

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I've got a car that can only be opened by key.

Trouble is, it looks as though any fairly similar BL key will open it.

So, I presume that:

1) anyone can get in, so don't leave stuff lying around

2) it is now a specialist olden-days skill, like the English wheel and wiring a plug, and that the current crop of genius crims would think to try a 'similar shaped key'.  The idiot crims would try it, though.

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2 hours ago, Frank Hovis said:

It`s much easier than nicking cars with keys if you know how ..it was the realms of the "professionals"  Alibaba is their friend also one particular cezch company 

Edited by Long time lurking

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2 hours ago, XswampyX said:

Had a quick look and it seems they are using some kind of repeater one for the car and another for the fob (key). I imagine they put one through your letterbox and the other by your car and then both the car & the fob think they are in the same place and the car opens and starts.

Nah they just strip the signal beforehand sat around car parks waiting to intercept the signal  just like rdfi chip readers strip the details off your debit/credit card 

Edited by Long time lurking

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42 minutes ago, Long time lurking said:

Nah they just strip the signal beforehand sat around car parks waiting to intercept the signal  just like rdfi chip readers strip the details off your debit/credit card 

The codes change each button press. They can't re-use it.

Quote

In 2015, it was reported that Samy Kamkar had built an inexpensive electronic device about the size of a wallet that could be concealed on or near a locked vehicle to capture a single keyless entry code to be used at a later time to unlock the vehicle. The device transmits a jamming signal to block the vehicle's reception of rolling code signals from the owner's fob, while recording these signals from both of his two attempts needed to unlock the vehicle. The recorded first code is sent to the vehicle only when the owner makes the second attempt, while the recorded second code is retained for future use. Kamkar stated that this vulnerability had been widely known for years to be present in many vehicle types, but was previously undemonstrated. A demonstration was announced for DEF CON 

Sneaky bastards!

Source :- http://autodoctor.co/auto/locksmiths/rippers-cross

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Few years back 2011 think, my neighbour went to Florida. His hire car was an Infinity with keyless locking/starting, just needed the blob on the key-ring - it came with normal keys too. He had never seen one before and couldn't understand why every time he locked the doors and boot with the key he tried the door to make sure it was locked and it was always unlocked. Baffled he left it unlocked overnight in his Kissimmee hotel car park. Next day he took it back to Alamo telling them the door locks don't work. Once they explained he was fine but for the rest of the holiday always sent the kids back to try the car doors just in case.

Another time a guy in work was on holiday in Canada, he parked his hire car directly underneath his Jasper motel room window so he could keep an eye on it. Next morning the car was gone. Turned out he threw his trousers containing his blob over the back of a chair in front of the window. Close enough for the car to be unlocked and able to start. Somebody started it up, made it as far as the road where the engine cut out so they left it there. Police towed it away.

Apart from the fright, he was billed CAD$450 for towing and releasing. 

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On 8/20/2017 at 13:26, XswampyX said:

The codes change each button press. They can't re-use it.

Sneaky bastards!

Source :- http://autodoctor.co/auto/locksmiths/rippers-cross

I have heard this, but I'm not sure I understand how it works. How does the car and the fob keep in sync? If I went on the train to London and the fob went off in my pocket 200 times it will still work when I get back. If it was a rolling number you would not expect it to work. Does the rolling number only move on when the fob gets a receipt acknowledgement from the car? In which case the hack described would be easy to circumvent by simply securing the acknowledgement code with a rolling number too.

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6 minutes ago, Hail the Tripod said:

I have heard this, but I'm not sure I understand how it works. How does the car and the fob keep in sync? If I went on the train to London and the fob went off in my pocket 200 times it will still work when I get back. If it was a rolling number you would not expect it to work. Does the rolling number only move on when the fob gets a receipt acknowledgement from the car? In which case the hack described would be easy to circumvent by simply securing the acknowledgement code with a rolling number too.

A typical implementation compares within the next 256 codes in case receiver missed some transmitted key presses.

Source :- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rolling_code

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Just now, Hail the Tripod said:

Thank you. It's always interesting to see how things actually work.

Indeed, if you really want to fuck your mate off in the pub, just press the unlock button on his keys 257 times! xD

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On 8/20/2017 at 10:16, Frank Hovis said:

How are they doing this then?  The story is lacking in detail.

I don' t know the full details, but there's been a spate near us BMW's mainly.

Apparently there's some gadget you can buy online for £100ish that will do it.  If the device is close enough to the car and the keys it can open it, so a kind of repeater I think. 

Some people were advising others to store their keys in the microwave to prevent it.

 

Sheer driving pleasure ... With your a £300 a month PCP plan.  Just be sure to store your keys in a Faraday cage and use one of those big f**k off yellow autolock things everytime the car's unattended.

 

 

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