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ASDA to close on Boxing Day


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Boxing Day: Pressure mounts on supermarkets to close - BBC News

Now, I'm not religious and I do think that shops should open when they want (assuming staff are treated well) - but I do like this idea.

I often used to feel sorry for shop staff* that would work on the 24th, have one day off and then in early on the 26th.  Not really much of a break.

 

*I'm also aware that other people work over Christmas and well done to them, but I don't think a supermarket really needs to be open.  And yes I know some like to do it - but I'm possibly harping back to the days when people had full time (35+ hours a week) jobs.

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Remember the days of CBI pronouncements that the economy would be irreparably sunk by an extra bank holiday?

The whole country should shut down for a fortnight over Xmas, it's a joke that we have to work all year when I think 2020 has proved everything will be just fine if we knock it on the head for a while

Yes, it was really very obvious short termism. I read years ago that there are only very limited ways to generate genuine wealth - grow something, manufacture something, extract something from th

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2 minutes ago, Calcutta said:

The whole country should shut down for a fortnight over Xmas, it's a joke that we have to work all year when I think 2020 has proved everything will be just fine if we knock it on the head for a while. 

The dilemma of making sure a full tank would last from the 24 till the new year when I was about 20 lol

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11 minutes ago, Calcutta said:

The whole country should shut down for a fortnight over Xmas, it's a joke that we have to work all year when I think 2020 has proved everything will be just fine if we knock it on the head for a while. 

No electricity, gas and a bloody impossibility getting them started early Jan. 

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My sister in law has queued up at Next on Boxing Day at about 4am for their sale opening at 6am - and it's mobbed.

Fucking madness.

'But I saved a fair bit on clothes for the kids' says she.......  'Look at what you spent on crap for Christmas' says I  (if I was really brave and could give a shit).

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36 minutes ago, Chewing Grass said:

Back in the 1970s all shops were shut on Boxing Day and everything seemed very civilised.

Can't see why anyone needs to scrum for discounted stuff until the 27th, if you need milk go to Mr Patels convenience store.

In the early 1960s there were almost no supermarkets so the question was not really relevant. Trains ran in that decade on Boxing Day and lots of places of entertainment were open back then. No one in England was entitled to New Years Day off either in the 1960s as it was not a public holiday 

Edited by Virgil Caine
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1 hour ago, eight said:

Remember the days of CBI pronouncements that the economy would be irreparably sunk by an extra bank holiday?

I'm a regular visitor to the US as I have family there and it was brought home to me sometime around 98 / 00 just how much the US had handed their manufacturing over to China.

The headline piece in the paper was about the need to keep "the economy" going and then set out precisely what they meant by that: everyone go out shopping.

The US manufacturing base had been hollowed out and the economy, according to the paper anyway, now entirely depended upon people getting out to Sears and Walmart and Footlocker and buying things because that now was the economy.: retailing Chinese imports.

At the time the US was very cheap so people went along with it but it turned a few years after that as monopolies were established (goodbye KMart, WalMart wins) and prices began to rise.

Even a moment's introspection would tell you that that just was not viable long term.

 

Edit: I missed the bit that had the relevance!  The paper was particularly urging people to get out buying because it was a short month and several days' shopping had been lost to festivals / bank holidays.

Edited by Frank Hovis
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3 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

I'm a regular visitor to the US as I have family there and it was brought home to me sometime around 98 / 00 just how much the US had handed their manufacturing over to China.

The headline piece in the paper was about the need to keep "the economy" going and then set out precisely what they meant by that: everyone go out shopping.

The US manufacturing base had been hollowed out and the economy, according to the paper anyway, now entirely depended upon people getting out to Sears and Walmart and Footlocker and buying things because that now was the economy.: retailing Chinese imports.

At the time the US was very cheap so people went along with it but it turned a few years after that as monopolies were established (goodbye KMart, WalMart wins) and prices began to rise.

Even a moment's introspection would tell you that that just was not viable long term.

 

Yes, it was really very obvious short termism.

I read years ago that there are only very limited ways to generate genuine wealth - grow something, manufacture something, extract something from the ground. Everything else, whilst perhaps profitable for some of the parties involved, is ultimately parasitic.

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5 minutes ago, eight said:

Yes, it was really very obvious short termism.

I read years ago that there are only very limited ways to generate genuine wealth - grow something, manufacture something, extract something from the ground. Everything else, whilst perhaps profitable for some of the parties involved, is ultimately parasitic.

Yes.

Why governments seem unable to see this escapes me; the route to wealth for a country is to add value and export.

In this country the economy has comprised the twin prongs of importing things from China and adding a mark up, now a duopoly under Amazon and eBay, and inflating house prices to make people take on more debt.

Bricks and mortar retail is thankfully collapsing; maybe the house prices will follow. 

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2 hours ago, eight said:

My father in law died a few years back happily believing that half day closing was still a thing. I think it ended round here some time around 1990.

Depends where you are - it's still a thing in some areas (I've seen it not long ago in traditional towns & villages in the North East - largely populated by an older generation who grew up with it and there's been nothing to force a change)

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7 hours ago, Calcutta said:

The whole country should shut down for a fortnight over Xmas, it's a joke that we have to work all year when I think 2020 has proved everything will be just fine if we knock it on the head for a while. 

I would much rather work over Xmas and New Year and have the extra two weeks off in the summer when the weather in the UK is, generally, far less shit.

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7 hours ago, Virgil Caine said:

In the early 1960s there were almost no supermarkets so the question was not really relevant. Trains ran in that decade on Boxing Day and lots of places of entertainment were open back then. No one in England was entitled to New Years Day off either in the 1960s as it was not a public holiday 

Football was played on Christmas day and Boxing Day - normally fierce local derbies. The last top flight English match played on Christmas Day  was in 65 - Blackpool v Blackburn Rovers.

Top non league sides would also play on both days and attract decent crowds. Men needed something to do whilst the ladies were cooking lunch.

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7 hours ago, eight said:

My father in law died a few years back happily believing that half day closing was still a thing. I think it ended round here some time around 1990.

Around here, North Ilford, a few shops still closed for the half day, Wednesday or Thursday, can't remember which, until very recently. By very recently I mean up until Covid restrictions screwed up normality.

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7 hours ago, Frank Hovis said:

Bricks and mortar retail is thankfully collapsing; maybe the house prices will follow. 

respectfully, when online retailers eventually have a captive audience of customers under near-perpetual house arrest, they will find themselves drunk on the heady wine of no other competition in sight; why would they lower prices? I expect they will further monopolise the most disparate products and services under fewer umbrellas, rather like all the media is now—broadcast, print, streamed and distributed—wholly controlled at the top by two, possibly three, companies.

Amazon Worldwide Foods. Pfizer-Boots Chemist. Royal Dutch Shell Rubber Shoes. Beatrice Boiler Suits for New World Order Workers. Pepsi University and Coca-Cola College

Retail will soon be in the hands of just a few mega-corporations and everything they sell will be just under what we can afford on Universal Basic Income.

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