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Started doing weights to improve strength, but feeling very weak/no progress


maffo
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I've been cycling more, generally eating better (mainly less, but have upped the fruit intake. I always liked my meat & veg) so I've have been really pleased with my near 2 stone weight loss so far.

I'm a lot leaner but I'm really struggling to add numbers/reps/Kg on the stack to my weight training. I am feeling really weak, I can manage up to my current level but cannot progress i.e. i can do 10-15 full press-ups but no more.

Advice please, I've tried to failure sets but that seems to make me weaker! I drink plenty of water & sleep pretty solidly. I'm 41 so not an old fella!

Edited by maffo
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Building muscle is a slow process.  Generally speaking, about six months of good consistent training before you notice any change in the mirror.  About a year before family/friends notice any change in you wearing clothes.  About 18-24 months before strangers can tell (wearing clothes).

15 press ups is good.

But unless you're fat you shouldn't be eating less.  Eat more.  Hit the same muscle every 72 hours.  Workout for an hour.  Do a push/pull routine.

And don't over exert yourself, otherwise you'll upset your tendons.  Which is what I've just done, now I feel like Kirk Douglas and have to fucking rehab both an elbow and a shoulder.

I have golfer's elbow, a result of ego lifting with very heavy curls.  Now I gotta sacrifice some of the physique I spent 2 years building, two steps back.  Tendon trouble is more common at 35+.

Edited by ElKapitan84
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It's worth spending a few weeks or months keeping a log of everything you eat and feeding it into one of those nutrition calculators. I did it a few years back with the myfitnesspal app. It soon became clear that my protein intake was shit. I was averaging less than 50g a day. At that level I wasn't going to build much muscle whatever exercise I did.

Personally I would recommend very rarely exercising to failure. Always try to leave a little in the tank.

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Hail the Tripod
4 hours ago, maffo said:

I've been cycling more, generally eating better (mainly less, but have upped the fruit intake. I always liked my meat & veg) so I've have been really pleased with my near 2 stone weight loss so far.

I'm a lot leaner but I'm really struggling to add numbers/reps/Kg on the stack to my weight training. I am feeling really weak, I can manage up to my current level but cannot progress i.e. i can do 10-15 full press-ups but no more.

Advice please, I've tried to failure sets but that seems to make me weaker! I drink plenty of water & sleep pretty solidly. I'm 41 so not an old fella!

People generally say do your maximum weights on each muscle group but hardly any reps, in order to bulk muscle.

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1 minute ago, The XYY Man said:

What, these fuckers....? Gerraway and shite...!

Uphill gardening is the only horticulture going on in this sub-forum...

 

XYY

I think I saw a weed growing out of a crack (Fnarr fnarr!)

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2 hours ago, Hail the Tripod said:

People generally say do your maximum weights on each muscle group but hardly any reps, in order to bulk muscle.

It's the opposite for hypertrophy.  Many reps, less weight.

 

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I'm surprised no one has mentioned Stronglifts 5x5 or starting strength yet. 

When you start lifting you should be able to add plenty of weight just through neuro-muscular adaptation (referred to as noob-gainz) rather than actually building muscle. 

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18 hours ago, ElKapitan84 said:

Building muscle is a slow process.  Generally speaking, about six months of good consistent training before you notice any change in the mirror.  About a year before family/friends notice any change in you wearing clothes.  About 18-24 months before strangers can tell (wearing clothes).

15 press ups is good.

But unless you're fat you shouldn't be eating less.  Eat more.  Hit the same muscle every 72 hours.  Workout for an hour.  Do a push/pull routine.

And don't over exert yourself, otherwise you'll upset your tendons.  Which is what I've just done, now I feel like Kirk Douglas and have to fucking rehab both an elbow and a shoulder.

I have golfer's elbow, a result of ego lifting with very heavy curls.  Now I gotta sacrifice some of the physique I spent 2 years building, two steps back.  Tendon trouble is more common at 35+.

I've been doing pushups for a few years now and I've been told that causes golfer's elbow. Doing the full motion..locking elbows and chest to floor. Never gets any easier doing  a planked shoulders to heel position  is bloody torture after the first 15 or so for me. Re. OP I don't think tough exercise ever gets much easier.

Anyway got the golfer's ( inner elbow, left arm) tendon trouble now;  not from exercise but chopping wood. Over ambitious tackling of large  trunk sections with knots that really needed a chainsaw..even using a metal wedge  ( aka log grenade ) sometimes  required a hundred or so whacks with an axe. Dropped pushups to three times a week. 

Not consulted a doctor, but after three months it looks like a tendon tear takes some healing if at all?

According to google, incidentally, chopping wood is the most common cause of golfer's elbow.

Edited by crashmonitor
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4 hours ago, crashmonitor said:

I've been doing pushups for a few years now and I've been told that causes golfer's elbow. Doing the full motion..locking elbows and chest to floor. Never gets any easier doing  a planked shoulders to heel position  is bloody torture after the first 15 or so for me. Re. OP I don't think tough exercise ever gets much easier.

Anyway got the golfer's ( inner elbow, left arm) tendon trouble now;  not from exercise but chopping wood. Over ambitious tackling of large  trunk sections with knots that really needed a chainsaw..even using a metal wedge  ( aka log grenade ) sometimes  required a hundred or so whacks with an axe. Dropped pushups to three times a week. 

Not consulted a doctor, but after three months it looks like a tendon tear takes some healing if at all?

According to google, incidentally, chopping wood is the most common cause of golfer's elbow.

Thank fuck someone else has this grade A cunt annoyance.

I was starting to re-hab it using various techniques seen on the internet.  I'd stretch the palm backwards while locking the elbow, vigorously massage forearm muscle and gently massage the tendon on the bone.  I'd do wrist curls as well.  It improved but I can't say if it was rest or otherwise.

My 're-hab' has been interrupted by falling like a retard and slicing the hand open.

But when I resume I'm going to follow the consensus seen online - build Pop Eye forearms with wrist curls and resume training at a lighter load.

Re: slow time, it appears that tendons are just extremely shitty at getting a good blood/nutrient flow.  Doctor is probably a waste of time.  Since we're on NHS I asked for some advice, gave me Co-Codomol which even as a layman I could tell would be useless, I just kept the prescription though for migraine/toothaches down the road.  They'll waste your time, especially during Covid.

I had wrist tendon troubles once.  What I did was stick my hands into hot water in a basin and stretch the hell out of the joints, it was gone within 2-3 weeks.

My advice would be to stretch, preferably in hot water (a good bath is a good place to fit the arm underwater), do wrist curls and resume some type of training of the arms as long as it doesn't go above 3-4/10 discomfort.

I really doubt push ups flare up the inner elbow though.  If you try chin ups, it should hurt way more.  Golfer's elbow = pulling, Tennis Elbow = pushing.  You probably go it pulling the axe down/swinging.

Edited by ElKapitan84
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Hail the Tripod
2 hours ago, ElKapitan84 said:

Thank fuck someone else has this grade A cunt annoyance.

I was starting to re-hab it using various techniques seen on the internet.  I'd stretch the palm backwards while locking the elbow, vigorously massage forearm muscle and gently massage the tendon on the bone.  I'd do wrist curls as well.  It improved but I can't say if it was rest or otherwise.

My 're-hab' has been interrupted by falling like a retard and slicing the hand open.

But when I resume I'm going to follow the consensus seen online - build Pop Eye forearms with wrist curls and resume training at a lighter load.

Re: slow time, it appears that tendons are just extremely shitty at getting a good blood/nutrient flow.  Doctor is probably a waste of time.  Since we're on NHS I asked for some advice, gave me Co-Codomol which even as a layman I could tell would be useless, I just kept the prescription though for migraine/toothaches down the road.  They'll waste your time, especially during Covid.

I had wrist tendon troubles once.  What I did was stick my hands into hot water in a basin and stretch the hell out of the joints, it was gone within 2-3 weeks.

My advice would be to stretch, preferably in hot water (a good bath is a good place to fit the arm underwater), do wrist curls and resume some type of training of the arms as long as it doesn't go above 3-4/10 discomfort.

I really doubt push ups flare up the inner elbow though.  If you try chin ups, it should hurt way more.  Golfer's elbow = pulling, Tennis Elbow = pushing.  You probably go it pulling the axe down/swinging.

I got golfers elbow drilling holes through a foot of concrete with a shitty hammer drill that wasn’t up to the task. Took the best part of 6 months to heal properly, but it has never flared up again since.

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I've upped the Tuna/Steak/Chicken count and feel a touch better, I wasn't eating enough it seems.

With regards to the wood chopping injury, I used to suffer similar as I was a tradesman and hammering really screwed my arm up. It was down to holding tools too tightly, you should relax and let the tool do the work, never force it, even a little.

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On 10/12/2020 at 18:10, Hail the Tripod said:

People generally say do your maximum weights on each muscle group but hardly any reps, in order to bulk muscle.


This.  If you want bulk..  low reps is the key.

We used to do “pyramids”..  three sets,  first aim for 12 reps.  If you can do more, increase the weight until you can’t.  Next set to aim for 8 reps.  Last set aim for 6.  As you get stronger,  you increase the weight, not the reps. You really need a buddy (or two) to spot you so you don’t get stuck under the weights,  and also to give you a break between sets.

Also, you want to focus on only a couple of muscle groups each session..  eg,  Monday biceps and shoulders,  Wednesday triceps and back, Friday chest and legs.   Each day do three different exercises for each muscle..  working them slightly differently if possible.   Free weights are preferable to machines where possible.

Creatine will give you a pretty impressive boost when you “peak” if you don’t mind taking supplements.  After that the next step is gaba protein.   If you get stiff / aching muscles the day after a workout you can take amino acids tablets to help reduce it.

That’s about as much as I can remember from when I used to do it.

Edited by Libspero
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On 10/12/2020 at 13:56, maffo said:

I've been cycling more, generally eating better (mainly less, but have upped the fruit intake. I always liked my meat & veg) so I've have been really pleased with my near 2 stone weight loss so far.

I'm a lot leaner but I'm really struggling to add numbers/reps/Kg on the stack to my weight training. I am feeling really weak, I can manage up to my current level but cannot progress i.e. i can do 10-15 full press-ups but no more.

Advice please, I've tried to failure sets but that seems to make me weaker! I drink plenty of water & sleep pretty solidly. I'm 41 so not an old fella!

Probably need more testosterone. The internet will have various lists to eat - none of it’s exciting it’s all shellfish, leafy greens and the like.

Building real strength is hard work which is why so many reach for the supplements, roids and gym swole look from a gazillion easy reps.

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Hail the Tripod
10 hours ago, SNACR said:

Probably need more testosterone. The internet will have various lists to eat - none of it’s exciting it’s all shellfish, leafy greens and the like.

Building real strength is hard work which is why so many reach for the supplements, roids and gym swole look from a gazillion easy reps.

Proper “Clams in black bean sauce” is as delicious as any food ever invented.

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On 11/12/2020 at 07:16, Roger_Mellie said:

I'm surprised no one has mentioned Stronglifts 5x5 or starting strength yet. 

 

Yes this. Don't fuck about, just get straight onto doing 5x5 sets of back squats 3 times a week. I defy anyone not to bulk up significantly, and more importantly get much, much stronger, doing that. I was about 30 when I did stronglifts for the first time and got stretch marks on my arse from where my glutes expanded so quickly. After a while I moved on to Madcow and then modified that a bit when it got too hard. At 5'11 and 13 1/2 stone I could back squat 400lb and deadlift 450. That level of strength isn't much by competitive powerlifter standards, but it was enough to make jobs like carrying furniture and white goods about way easier than before. I wasn't particularly bulky but I started to have difficulty finding clothes that fit just because my proportions were so different to non-lifters.

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On 10/12/2020 at 16:54, ElKapitan84 said:

Generally speaking, about six months of good consistent training before you notice any change in the mirror.  About a year before family/friends notice any change in you wearing clothes.  About 18-24 months before strangers can tell (wearing clothes).

Oh, sod that. It's quicker to learn another language.

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On 13/12/2020 at 23:02, SNACR said:

Probably need more testosterone. The internet will have various lists to eat - none of it’s exciting it’s all shellfish, leafy greens and the like.

Building real strength is hard work which is why so many reach for the supplements, roids and gym swole look from a gazillion easy reps.

My libido is through the roof and I have flared up in a touch of slightly rough acne, I doubt I have low T issues!? xD

 

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Everyone is different but generally stick to compound lifts for low reps i.e. 5 or less with close to maximum weight if you want to gain strength.

3 hours ago, ElKapitan84 said:

Be careful with form with low reps.  Your back and shoulders need extra care, especially for a bunch of old fucks like us. o.O

Also the above.

In my experience it is a lot harder to gain strength once you are over 35 but it is doable it just takes time and consistency.

Edited by ILikeCake
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14 hours ago, DTMark said:

Oh, sod that. It's quicker to learn another language.

This is part of the problem. Everyone thinks they're in the Rocky IV training montage, 5 minutes of hard work and you're fit enough and strong enough to beat Ivan Drago. 

The reality is that Stronglifts is a beginners program and can easily take a year or more of train g 3x a week before you're ready to move onto something that could vaguely be called 'intermediate'. 

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18 minutes ago, Roger_Mellie said:

This is part of the problem. Everyone thinks they're in the Rocky IV training montage, 5 minutes of hard work and you're fit enough and strong enough to beat Ivan Drago.

The other part of the problem is that when you stop,  it is very hard to stop all that muscle turning into fat..

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1 hour ago, Libspero said:

The other part of the problem is that when you stop,  it is very hard to stop all that muscle turning into fat..

Muscle memory is a great thing.  It's like its own little shot of PEDs.

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