Jump to content
DOSBODS
  • Welcome to DOSBODS

     

    DOSBODS is free of any advertising.

    Ads are annoying, and - increasingly - advertising companies limit free speech online. DOSBODS Forums are completely free to use. Please create a free account to be able to access all the features of the DOSBODS community. It only takes 20 seconds!

     

‘New’ Personality Type identified....


Recommended Posts


.......‘The tendency to see oneself as a victim’.

 

Nothing new about this ‘personality type’. IMHO it just seems much more prevalent in this day and age.

I have encountered a large number of these type of people - and it’s probably my single most loathed trait that I could see in another person.

People who cannot take responsibility for their own actions and seem to ‘get off’ on being a victim.

I’d much rather work or socialise with a ‘functioning’ psychopath any day of the week as opposed to a person with this ‘victim mentality’ personality trait. 
 

Anyway else experienced these type of people?

Is it more pronounced and common in today’s society and with the advent of social media?

Any examples of people not taking responsibility and blaming all their ‘life ills’ on others and setting themselves up ‘as a victim’? 


Here’s the paper on it:

https://www.psypost.org/2020/12/researchers-identify-a-new-personality-construct-that-describes-the-tendency-to-see-oneself-as-a-victim-58753/amp

A new personality construct has been defined that describes people who persistently see themselves as victims within interpersonal conflicts. The research was published in Personality and Individual Differences.

Study authors Rahav Gabay and team describe how the social world is satiated with interpersonal transgressions that are often unpleasant and seemingly unwarranted, such as being interrupted when speaking. While some people can easily brush off these moments of hurt, others tend to ruminate over them and persistently paint themselves as a victim. The authors present this feeling of being the victim as a novel personality construct that influences how people make sense of the world around them.

The researchers call it the Tendency for Interpersonal Victimhood (TIV), which they define as “an ongoing feeling that the self is a victim, which is generalized across many kinds of relationships.”

 

Through a series of eight studies among Israeli adults, Gabay and associates sought to test the validity of the construct of TIV and explore the behavioral, cognitive, and emotional consequences of such a personality trait.

An initial three studies established the TIV as a consistent and stable trait that involves four dimensions: moral elitism, a lack of empathy, the need for recognition, and rumination. A follow-up study further found that this tendency for victimhood is linked to anxious attachment  — an attachment style characterized by feeling insecure in one’s relationships — suggesting that the personality trait may be rooted in early relationships with caregivers.

Next, two studies offered insight into the cognitive profile of those with TIV. The studies had participants consider scenarios that involved another person treating them unpleasantly — either by having subjects read a vignette describing a partner giving them poor feedback (Study 3) or by having subjects play a game that ended with their opponent taking a larger share of the winnings (Study 4). Interestingly, the two studies found that those who scored higher on the measure of TIV were more likely to desire revenge against the person who wronged them.

In Study 4, this desire for revenge also translated into behavior — those high in TIV were more likely to remove money from their opponent when given the chance, despite being told that this decision wouldn’t increase their own winnings. Participants high in TIV also reported experiencing more intense negative emotions and a higher entitlement to immoral behavior. Mediation analysis offered insight into how this revenge process unfolds. “The higher participants’ TIV, the more they experienced negative emotions and felt entitled to behave immorally. However, only the experience of negative emotions predicted behavioral revenge,” the authors report.

Gabay and colleagues express that their studies indicate that the Tendency for Interpersonal Victimhood is a stable personality trait that is linked to particular behavioral, cognitive, and emotional characteristics. “Deeply rooted in the relations with primary caregivers,” the researchers describe, “this tendency affects how individuals feel, think, and behave in what they perceive as hurtful situations throughout their lives.”

The researchers suggest that TIV as a construct offers a framework for understanding how a person’s interpretation of social transgressions can inform feelings of victimhood and lead to revenge behaviors. These insights could inform therapeutic practices for treating such cognitive biases.

The authors suggest that it would be particularly interesting for future studies to explore what happens when people high in TIV are in positions of power. The researchers wonder whether leaders with this persistent tendency to see themselves as a victim might feel more inclined to behave “in a vindictive way.”

The study, “The Tendency for Interpersonal Victimhood: The Personality Construct and its Consequences”, was authored by Rahav Gabay, Boaz Hameiri, Tammy Rubel-Lifschitz, and Arie Nadler.

Edited by Vendetta
Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Vendetta said:

.......‘The tendency to see oneself as a victim’

People who cannot take responsibility for their own actions and seem to ‘get off’ on being a victim.

Anyway else experienced these type of people?

I'm Welsh mate, and live in Wales. What do you think ?  xD

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Melchett said:

My sister.

Shes 60 in January. Never in her 60 years have I heard her indicate that any of the shit in her life might have been down to her own decisions. It’s always ‘I been done wrong.’ This type of person is nothing new. 

“How many people does each of us know who claim to seek happiness but freely choose paths inevitably leading to misery?”

https://www.city-journal.org/html/taste-danger-11722.html

Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, stokiescum said:

Will be interesting that’s for sure.but I can’t see how they can

The threat of it can be enough.

Was it Denmark that talked about confiscating the assets of bennie seeking refugees? Result was less refugees.

Gordon Brown talked about having special hostels for unmarried teen mothers and there was a (temporary?) drop in teenage pregnancies.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 13/12/2020 at 15:52, Vendetta said:


.......‘The tendency to see oneself as a victim’.

 

Nothing new about this ‘personality type’. IMHO it just seems much more prevalent in this day and age.

I have encountered a large number of these type of people - and it’s probably my single most loathed trait that I could see in another person.

People who cannot take responsibility for their own actions and seem to ‘get off’ on being a victim.

I’d much rather work or socialise with a ‘functioning’ psychopath any day of the week as opposed to a person with this ‘victim mentality’ personality trait. 
 

Anyway else experienced these type of people?

Is it more pronounced and common in today’s society and with the advent of social media?

Any examples of people not taking responsibility and blaming all their ‘life ills’ on others and setting themselves up ‘as a victim’? 


Here’s the paper on it:

https://www.psypost.org/2020/12/researchers-identify-a-new-personality-construct-that-describes-the-tendency-to-see-oneself-as-a-victim-58753/amp

A new personality construct has been defined that describes people who persistently see themselves as victims within interpersonal conflicts. The research was published in Personality and Individual Differences.

Study authors Rahav Gabay and team describe how the social world is satiated with interpersonal transgressions that are often unpleasant and seemingly unwarranted, such as being interrupted when speaking. While some people can easily brush off these moments of hurt, others tend to ruminate over them and persistently paint themselves as a victim. The authors present this feeling of being the victim as a novel personality construct that influences how people make sense of the world around them.

The researchers call it the Tendency for Interpersonal Victimhood (TIV), which they define as “an ongoing feeling that the self is a victim, which is generalized across many kinds of relationships.”

 

Through a series of eight studies among Israeli adults, Gabay and associates sought to test the validity of the construct of TIV and explore the behavioral, cognitive, and emotional consequences of such a personality trait.

An initial three studies established the TIV as a consistent and stable trait that involves four dimensions: moral elitism, a lack of empathy, the need for recognition, and rumination. A follow-up study further found that this tendency for victimhood is linked to anxious attachment  — an attachment style characterized by feeling insecure in one’s relationships — suggesting that the personality trait may be rooted in early relationships with caregivers.

Next, two studies offered insight into the cognitive profile of those with TIV. The studies had participants consider scenarios that involved another person treating them unpleasantly — either by having subjects read a vignette describing a partner giving them poor feedback (Study 3) or by having subjects play a game that ended with their opponent taking a larger share of the winnings (Study 4). Interestingly, the two studies found that those who scored higher on the measure of TIV were more likely to desire revenge against the person who wronged them.

In Study 4, this desire for revenge also translated into behavior — those high in TIV were more likely to remove money from their opponent when given the chance, despite being told that this decision wouldn’t increase their own winnings. Participants high in TIV also reported experiencing more intense negative emotions and a higher entitlement to immoral behavior. Mediation analysis offered insight into how this revenge process unfolds. “The higher participants’ TIV, the more they experienced negative emotions and felt entitled to behave immorally. However, only the experience of negative emotions predicted behavioral revenge,” the authors report.

Gabay and colleagues express that their studies indicate that the Tendency for Interpersonal Victimhood is a stable personality trait that is linked to particular behavioral, cognitive, and emotional characteristics. “Deeply rooted in the relations with primary caregivers,” the researchers describe, “this tendency affects how individuals feel, think, and behave in what they perceive as hurtful situations throughout their lives.”

The researchers suggest that TIV as a construct offers a framework for understanding how a person’s interpretation of social transgressions can inform feelings of victimhood and lead to revenge behaviors. These insights could inform therapeutic practices for treating such cognitive biases.

The authors suggest that it would be particularly interesting for future studies to explore what happens when people high in TIV are in positions of power. The researchers wonder whether leaders with this persistent tendency to see themselves as a victim might feel more inclined to behave “in a vindictive way.”

The study, “The Tendency for Interpersonal Victimhood: The Personality Construct and its Consequences”, was authored by Rahav Gabay, Boaz Hameiri, Tammy Rubel-Lifschitz, and Arie Nadler.

New ????

What have these fucktards been doing.

Spending anytime down DSS in the last 40 years would have given them all the material they need.

Oh, I cant do that job. I've terrible bunions .. honestly the Drs need to put a zip in ... I'm in n out .... and barely take a step out of the house  ...

Link to post
Share on other sites

Rooted in Critical Theory is the idea that the world is full of victims who can then be organised into hierarchies of victimhood.

Since the Left don't know what they exist for any more - it's certainly not the class struggle which typified previous decades - and with the rise of the far left with a nod to cultural marxism with which Critical Theory is associated - the industry of victimhood has become their raison d'etre / ragione di essere / reason to exist.

That people see themselves as victims is predictable if they engage in any politics of a left-wing nature since that is what they are being told.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 13/12/2020 at 17:44, Melchett said:

My sister.

Shes 60 in January. Never in her 60 years have I heard her indicate that any of the shit in her life might have been down to her own decisions. It’s always ‘I been done wrong.’ This type of person is nothing new. 

Does she post on here?

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 13/12/2020 at 16:44, Melchett said:

My sister.

Shes 60 in January. Never in her 60 years have I heard her indicate that any of the shit in her life might have been down to her own decisions. It’s always ‘I been done wrong.’ This type of person is nothing new. 

Not recently divorced and living in Whitby, is she?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...