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Connected to celeb mastermind.

James Haskell is 6.3 20 stone.

Rugby union doesn’t know what has hit it

Other sports are changing because of harm to players

https://www.ft.com/content/70985c58-f884-4218-a7fb-49c64e962a24



What’s it like to win the Rugby World Cup? Steve Thompson should know, but he doesn’t. He was in the England team that won the 2003 final in Sydney. Yet, aged 42, he has signs of dementia. “I can’t even remember being in Australia,” he said this week. He is one of eight former professionals preparing to sue rugby union’s governing bodies.

 

...



Commentators and fans have celebrated the “big hits” and “dominant tackles” dished out by 120kg players. The way to win, especially for Eddie Jones’s current England team, is to overpower your opponents, not to out-think or out-create them. Tackles per world cup game have increased by a third since 2003. If this is your idea of fun, accept the consequences. Brain injuries often take years to manifest — one common sporting disorder, chronic traumatic encephalopathy, can only be diagnosed after death — but look at the players’ bodies.

Dylan Hartley, the former England captain who retired last year aged 33, says walking hurts. Sam Warburton, the former Wales captain who retired aged 29, says he was so bruised after games that he had to go up and down stairs on his hands and knees. “If something isn’t done soon, then a professional player will die during a game,” Warburton said last year.

From comments

Having played the sport as it went pro I would not allow my son near a rugby pitch. Even at lower levels players are paid in cars / jobs / a few bob a week and spend every day in the gym getting ready to make big hits. Private schools allow young boys to pummel themselves 5 days a week in training and then for 80 mins at the weekend. 
 
I can't see why any parent would knowingly sign up a child to the clear and present risk this once fun and skillful game presents. 
 

Theres going to be a lot of even thicker public school boys floating around.

Rugby is one of the activities that, if I saw it in a ac CV , I'd never offer a job to.

Some pretty horrendous experience of rugger buggers at works do.

And the constant sickies/nipping off to the physio...

 

Edited by spygirl
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6 minutes ago, spygirl said:

Connect to celeb masymind.

James Haskell is 6.3 20 stone.

Rugby union doesn’t know what has hit it

Other sports are changing because of harm to players

https://www.ft.com/content/70985c58-f884-4218-a7fb-49c64e962a24



What’s it like to win the Rugby World Cup? Steve Thompson should know, but he doesn’t. He was in the England team that won the 2003 final in Sydney. Yet, aged 42, he has signs of dementia. “I can’t even remember being in Australia,” he said this week. He is one of eight former professionals preparing to sue rugby union’s governing bodies.

 

...



Commentators and fans have celebrated the “big hits” and “dominant tackles” dished out by 120kg players. The way to win, especially for Eddie Jones’s current England team, is to overpower your opponents, not to out-think or out-create them. Tackles per world cup game have increased by a third since 2003. If this is your idea of fun, accept the consequences. Brain injuries often take years to manifest — one common sporting disorder, chronic traumatic encephalopathy, can only be diagnosed after death — but look at the players’ bodies.

Dylan Hartley, the former England captain who retired last year aged 33, says walking hurts. Sam Warburton, the former Wales captain who retired aged 29, says he was so bruised after games that he had to go up and down stairs on his hands and knees. “If something isn’t done soon, then a professional player will die during a game,” Warburton said last year.

From comments

Having played the sport as it went pro I would not allow my son near a rugby pitch. Even at lower levels players are paid in cars / jobs / a few bob a week and spend every day in the gym getting ready to make big hits. Private schools allow young boys to pummel themselves 5 days a week in training and then for 80 mins at the weekend. 
 
I can't see why any parent would knowingly sign up a child to the clear and present risk this once fun and skillful game presents. 
 

Theres going to be a lot of even thicker public school boys floating around.

Rugby is one of the activities that, if I saw it in a ac CV , I'd never offer a job to.

Some pretty horrendous experience of rugger buggers at works do.

And the constant sickies/nipping off to the physio...

 

House prices and the economy?

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I can't help but feel that these people have done very well out of it.  Sure, they're ill now, but isn't it the same as things like adventure sports or motor racing etc etc -- just that in those the death comes first, whereas in Rugby the death comes very slowly a couple of decades later.

I'm far more sympathetic to those that have injury problems after playing the game at amateur level.

But really the only solution is for the game to be banned -- the contact is a core feature of the sport.

Well, maybe they could have a handicap system, where the more you weigh the more layers of foam you have to wear.  That would be amusing in itself.  (In my imagination this solution is more like 'it's a knockout!' than 'American football'.

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Most sportspeople at a high level earn more than they ever could in another field.  They are trading money for health, as we all do one way or another.  As long as the risks are clearly set out, I'm OK with adults deciding to roll the dice.

Note, this is not the same as allowing pitfights to the death for money.  This is sports where the risk of long term injury is there, but not guaranteed.

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2 hours ago, wherebee said:

Most sportspeople at a high level earn more than they ever could in another field.  They are trading money for health, as we all do one way or another.  As long as the risks are clearly set out, I'm OK with adults deciding to roll the dice.

Note, this is not the same as allowing pitfights to the death for money.  This is sports where the risk of long term injury is there, but not guaranteed.

Football yes.

Then a rapidly declining slope for everyone else.

 

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7 hours ago, wherebee said:

Most sportspeople at a high level earn more than they ever could in another field.  They are trading money for health, as we all do one way or another.  As long as the risks are clearly set out, I'm OK with adults deciding to roll the dice.

Note, this is not the same as allowing pitfights to the death for money.  This is sports where the risk of long term injury is there, but not guaranteed.

I remember at school reading of a poll of high-level athletes, who were asked whether they would take a supplement that would guarantee them an Olympic gold medal in their chosen discipline, but was also guaranteed to kill them at the age of 30.

100% said that they would take it.

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