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I want to ride my bicycle but..


longtomsilver

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longtomsilver

I've got a 2019 Specialized Rockhopper Expert which is great for sub 2-3 hour rides but sans soft tail = sore arse.

Would it be possible to buy a full suspension frame then swap the parts over from the hard tail and add a Manitou McLeod rear shock to the mix? Or would it be a nightmare and require lots of spacers and other parts I might not have thought of? 

Ideally, I'd like to buy a second hand frame and do a complete strip and respray. Loads of new chinese knockoffs frames available for £160-200.

The alternative would be to spend money on a decent drop post with suspension. Would that be as effective?

Here are the specs of my current ride.

A1 SL Aluminum, Sport XC 29 Geometry, tapered head tube, internal cable routing, Boost QR 141x9mm forged dropouts, chainstay-mounted disc brake, replaceable alloy derailleur hanger
FORK SR Suntour XCR-Air 29, rebound adjust, air spring, 46mm offset, 80/90/100mm of travel (size-specific)
FRONT HUB Shimano, Center Lockâ„¢ disc, 9x100mm spacing, quick-release, 28h
REAR HUB Shimano, Center Lockâ„¢ disc, 9x141mm spacing, quick-release, 32h
SPOKES Stainless, 14g, black
RIMS Stout XC 29, 25mm internal width, disc-specific, 2Bliss Ready
INNER TUBES Presta, 40mm valve
FRONT TYRE Ground Control Sport, 29x2.3"
REAR TYRE Fast Trak Sport, 29x2.1"
CRANKSET Stout, forged alloy, 2x9
CHAINRINGS Alloy, Steel, 36/22T
BOTTOM BRACKET Square taper, 73mm, internal bearings
SHIFT LEVERS Shimano Acera, RapidFire Plus, 9-speed
FRONT DERAILLEUR microSHIFT FD-M462, 2-speed
REAR DERAILLEUR Shimano Deore 9-speed
CASSETTE SunRace, 9-Speed, 11-36t
CHAIN KMC X9EPT, 9-speed, anti-corrosion coating w/ reusable Missing Linkâ„¢
FRONT BRAKE Shimano BR-MT200, hydraulic disc, 160/180mm
REAR BRAKE Shimano BR-MT200, hydraulic disc, 160mm
HANDLEBARS Stout XC, double-butted alloy, 8-degree backsweep, 6-degree upsweep, 10mm rise, 31.8mm
GRIPS Specialized MTB Grip, lock-on
STEM Stout 3D-forged alloy, 31.8mm, 6-degree rise
SADDLE Henge Sport, steel rails, 143mm
SEATPOST Alloy, 12mm offset, 2-bolt clamp, 30.9mm
SEAT BINDER Alloy, QR clamp, 34.9mm
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Chewing Grass

Throw away the stock saddle, get one that suits you (no padded bullshit ones) and set it up right.

I swear by Brooks (other people don't) and have done 200 miles in a day and still been able to walk.

The other essential item is decent cycle shorts, the interface between your arse and the saddle.

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longtomsilver
12 minutes ago, Chewing Grass said:

Throw away the stock saddle, get one that suits you (no padded bullshit ones) and set it up right.

I swear by Brooks (other people don't) and have done 200 miles in a day and still been able to walk.

The other essential item is decent cycle shorts, the interface between your arse and the saddle.

The stock saddle is the one that came with my first rockhopper pre-2000s - they all come with plastic **** nowadays.

Thanks for the Brooks recommendation - I'll pay attention. So it's got nothing to do with the lack of a soft tail? I'm returning to biking after a long lay off. It's only the saddle bum that has kept me off it.

Would a fox dropper post be of additional benefit? My budget is £400 max and that'd pay for the two. 

Edited by longtomsilver
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Chewing Grass
Just now, longtomsilver said:

The stock saddle is the one that came with my first rockhopper pre-2000s - they all come with plastic **** nowadays.

Thanks for the Brooke's recommendation - I'll pay attention. So it's got nothing to do with the lack of a soft tail? I'm returning to biking after a long lay off. It's only the saddle bum that has kept me off it.

Would a fox dropper post be of additional benefit? My budget is £400 max and that'd pay for the two. 

You don't really need a dropper post unless you are doing really steep gnarly downhill stuff.

Arse comfort has nothing to do with soft suspension at the rear.

Its all to do with your 'sit bones' and the saddle as everyone is different, leather Brooks saddle morph with age to suit them.

This might be a good start but might not be the best explanation.

https://blog.bikefit.com/sit-bones-width-measurement-and-bike-saddle-selection/

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onlyme

Another vote for the Brooks,Rolls Royce of saddles, the standard Bromton saddles are nice too being designed for your more casual rider who is going to need a more forgiving decent quality saddle.

Edited by onlyme
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nirvana
2 hours ago, longtomsilver said:

I've got a 2019 Specialized Rockhopper Expert

that's a really nice bike, I'd keep it as is and supplement it with an ebike!!

Lapierre eZesty 

 

Disclaimer: I haven't ridden one and don't ride mountain bikes anymore

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longtomsilver
18 minutes ago, 5min OCD speculator said:

that's a really nice bike, I'd keep it as is and supplement it with an ebike!!

Lapierre eZesty 

 

Disclaimer: I haven't ridden one and don't ride mountain bikes anymore

That e-bike is £5,000 😳 plus the 15mph upper limit of assistance rules that out for me as I can (and) do have a motorbike for similar money. If I can make my rockhopper a more comfortable ride first with a new saddle I will. The only downside is mine comes in their heritage colours bile is a more fitting description of the pallete.

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The XYY Man

These e-bikes are shite mind - and are in no way fit for your typical DOSBODder.

Why can't I buy one that gives me a really close shave - and also makes excellent fucking coffee...

 

XYY

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Bobthebuilder
42 minutes ago, 5min OCD speculator said:

that's a really nice bike, I'd keep it as is and supplement it with an ebike!!

Lapierre eZesty 

 

Disclaimer: I haven't ridden one and don't ride mountain bikes anymore

I can just see the future looming on that bike. No more ICE but bikes fully loaded with great tech, batteries, motors etc. Just ripe for the next electric vehicle tax

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longtomsilver
5 hours ago, Chewing Grass said:

You don't really need a dropper post unless you are doing really steep gnarly downhill stuff.

Arse comfort has nothing to do with soft suspension at the rear.

Its all to do with your 'sit bones' and the saddle as everyone is different, leather Brooks saddle morph with age to suit them.

This might be a good start but might not be the best explanation.

https://blog.bikefit.com/sit-bones-width-measurement-and-bike-saddle-selection/

Thank you I took all your advice onboard and have ordered the Brooks Flyer Special in brown for £110. It looks exquisite and supports my principles of buying 'Made in England' wherever I can. 

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Chewing Grass
3 minutes ago, longtomsilver said:

Thank you I took all your advice onboard and have ordered the Brooks Flyer Special in brown for £110. It looks exquisite and supports my principles of buying 'Made in England' wherever I can. 

That's the one I use, have a brown one and a black one (brown is the best colour), if it doesn't feel OK on first ride give it about 100 miles or eight hours to bed in to your arse. You will probably need to push it as far back on the rails as it will go as they are a traditional design and may need to tension the nose once it is broken in.

Its like having a living thing.

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longtomsilver
4 minutes ago, Chewing Grass said:

That's the one I use, have a brown one and a black one (brown is the best colour), if it doesn't feel OK on first ride give it about 100 miles or eight hours to bed in to your arse. You will probably need to push it as far back on the rails as it will go as they are a traditional design and may need to tension the nose once it is broken in.

Its like having a living thing.

Perversely, I like breaking things in slowly as it alludes to the quality of a product. Solovair boots and shoes are the same. 

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Dogtania
4 hours ago, Bobthebuilder said:

I used to love the rock hoppers in the 90s, small frame ideal for a ex BMXer.

Ex bmx'er good stuff.  

When I was about 20 got a very cheap specialized hard rock (guess pretty entry level but better then the older hard rocks I guess mid 90's ones.).  Had a friend that was very good with the mountain bikes (think he used to do the technical competing stuff too which would be closer to the BMX). 

He taught me to do bunny hops and allowed me to push the limits ever so much just to feel progress. Really fun, wish I had done when a kid and invincible - I much preferred mucking about in the street etc then the downhill stuff.

Another friend around same time had a specialized, not sure if it was technically a BMX, but very close to.  Iirc it was called something like T5 and was meant to be almost worth as much in design or parts as you paid for it.

Re thread title, have had that promlem in the past of I get a bike again will have to look at brooks.  Always put it down to bony ass or something.

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To answer your original question, yes you can fit most or all of the parts from a hardtail to a full sus frame. But there are plenty of things to watch out for: the axle spacings ("Boost" is becoming the new standard and is completely incompatible with older stuff); whether or not the new frame accepts a front mech or is single chainring only, the size of the headset and whether it's tapered etc. etc. Realistically it is likely to be far less arse ache to simply sell your existing bike and put the money towards buying a complete full sus bike, there are plenty around second hand.

A full sus bike is a bit easier on the arse if you're trying to ride long distances off road- or easier on the legs, you can ride stuff sat down that would be painful otherwise.

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Melchett

All good stuff on here, but.... never drop 110 quid on a saddle before trying it out. Until you are fully aware of what you like you should always buy a saddle from a bike shop that lets you spend some time sitting on it first. I’d also recommend the principle of cheap first then scale up to a more expensive similar design once you’re happy. Although if you like stuff like the Charge Spoon/ Madison Flux you’ve got lucky and don’t ever need to spend more.

Personally, my arse can’t stand brooks saddles. Especially the leather old style ones. But give me a Spoon or, if I’m feeling flash, a Fizik Arione and I’m in heaven. I also have never met a ‘San Marco Rolls” style saddle I couldn’t get on with. Wonderful.

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longtomsilver
3 hours ago, Melchett said:

All good stuff on here, but.... never drop 110 quid on a saddle before trying it out. Until you are fully aware of what you like you should always buy a saddle from a bike shop that lets you spend some time sitting on it first. I’d also recommend the principle of cheap first then scale up to a more expensive similar design once you’re happy. Although if you like stuff like the Charge Spoon/ Madison Flux you’ve got lucky and don’t ever need to spend more.

Personally, my arse can’t stand brooks saddles. Especially the leather old style ones. But give me a Spoon or, if I’m feeling flash, a Fizik Arione and I’m in heaven. I also have never met a ‘San Marco Rolls” style saddle I couldn’t get on with. Wonderful.

You are absolutely right in your assertion. The flyer is based on the B17 so sizing wise this has to be the general all round size that fits most guys. I've a scrawny arse so maybe a narrower version would have suited better bit that one isn't sprung. I'm saving money by not spending/upgrading to a full suspension bike which as @Mr Miyagi says won't have any effect other than to make me go faster subject to my limitations of course. I used to tear down my local hill on a soft tail reaching speeds of 45mph but I was young and foolish now I'm older and have an innate sense of life preservation that's out the equation. 

I'd have preferred to get the *B17 or 15 together with a suspension post as it looks less antiquated however the one I found is sold out everywhere. If it's not right I'll gift it to one of my close friends to go on his Raleigh 3 speed.

*B17 Brooks Special Lab 😍😍

b211-167202-b17_special_brooklab_1-leather-black-3-4-.jpg

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Long time lurking
On 20/12/2020 at 16:07, longtomsilver said:

? I'm returning to biking after a long lay off

That is the problem it takes a good dozen rides or so to get used to it just give it a day or two to recover and slowly the soreness will go 

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