Jump to content
DOSBODS
  • Welcome to DOSBODS

     

    DOSBODS is free of any advertising.

    Ads are annoying, and - increasingly - advertising companies limit free speech online. DOSBODS Forums are completely free to use. Please create a free account to be able to access all the features of the DOSBODS community. It only takes 20 seconds!

     

More winter cycling this year along with more night rides(and running)


haroldshand

Recommended Posts

haroldshand

I never have any problems with running in winter, even in the worst conditions and with the right kit, I actually enjoy it more sometimes. But I always back off with cycling in winter for some reason, that stops this year. I went out this Saturday and it was initially cold but warmed up after a few miles and did a 35 mile ride, it was actually quite warm for December and I know it will get worse. 

I know a good windproof will be needed now after this weekends attempt and knowing it will get worse, and I have now ordered some gloves.

Any more tips for winter cycling?

I am also going out in the evenings now and I live in a village miles from anywhere so am going out in pitch black, it started with the jogging as I usually  am always rushing home to beat the dark nights and it's always a stress. Not only is getting well lit up with head torch etc and running in the spooky empty countryside it is also so relaxing and enjoyable, what have I been missing,  I want to do the same cycling now and just stick to 25 mile tops cycle rides.

  • Agree 1
  • Cheers 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
stop_the_craziness

Not sure if you are road cycling or off-road so I'll just do both.

Road

If you decide to buy heavier duty cycle tights then don't buy them too small as the compression around your knees gets really achey after a while.  Better to go a size up

Casquette or thermal skull-cap under your helmet makes a huge difference.  If you go skull-cap then get one that covers your ears as well

Overshoes - not just good for rain, but keeps the wind off your feet which keeps them warmer

Don't buy gloves that are too thick and over-glove like.  You need to still "feel" your bike, especially when braking.

Offroad

** As per the road advice above, but also....

Waterproof socks changed my life.  Don't be stingy, buy expensive ones (e.g. sealskins) and they'll pay you back in spades.  And neoprene overshoes.  Or you could just forget those two and just buy the neoprene shoes/boots instead

Likewise waterproof mountain bike trousers.  Don't buy these too small either, as the seams are like those on diving suits, once you split them it's over.  Put your vanity away and go a size up.

Lights - a light on your helmet is useful for seeing further into the distance than the light on your bike.

 

And some non-kit related thoughts

Don't ride through puddles on the road unless you can't avoid it because you never know what's under there.  It could be a massive pothole or there could be road debris/glass that can ruin your tyres or wheels or throw you off.

Brake before a corner, not when you're going round it is good advice in any weather, but particularly so when you are on a wet road or a slippery, muddy field.  Most crashes happen when changing direction.

The time to be on highest alert is when it first starts raining on a dry road.  Especially if it hasn't rained for a while as any surface grease will have just been made wet.

Edited by stop_the_craziness
  • Agree 2
  • Informative 2
  • Cheers 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
haroldshand
9 hours ago, stop_the_craziness said:

Not sure if you are road cycling or off-road so I'll just do both.

Road

If you decide to buy heavier duty cycle tights then don't buy them too small as the compression around your knees gets really achey after a while.  Better to go a size up

Casquette or thermal skull-cap under your helmet makes a huge difference.  If you go skull-cap then get one that covers your ears as well

Overshoes - not just good for rain, but keeps the wind off your feet which keeps them warmer

Don't buy gloves that are too thick and over-glove like.  You need to still "feel" your bike, especially when braking.

Offroad

** As per the road advice above, but also....

Waterproof socks changed my life.  Don't be stingy, buy expensive ones (e.g. sealskins) and they'll pay you back in spades.  And neoprene overshoes.  Or you could just forget those two and just buy the neoprene shoes/boots instead

Likewise waterproof mountain bike trousers.  Don't buy these too small either, as the seams are like those on diving suits, once you split them it's over.  Put your vanity away and go a size up.

Lights - a light on your helmet is useful for seeing further into the distance than the light on your bike.

 

And some non-kit related thoughts

Don't ride through puddles on the road unless you can't avoid it because you never know what's under there.  It could be a massive pothole or there could be road debris/glass that can ruin your tyres or wheels or throw you off.

Brake before a corner, not when you're going round it is good advice in any weather, but particularly so when you are on a wet road or a slippery, muddy field.  Most crashes happen when changing direction.

The time to be on highest alert is when it first starts raining on a dry road.  Especially if it hasn't rained for a while as any surface grease will have just been made wet.

Really useful

I never feel the cold while running no matter how cold it gets, but I suppose you are never running harder than 7 Mph training and little wind to chill you, riding a bike anything up to 30 mph and you feel the chill. If anything I am going to over do the extra layers and even take a small rucksack if need be to hold stuff as I take clothing  off or even put more on, times do no matter,

Link to post
Share on other sites
stop_the_craziness
6 hours ago, haroldshand said:

Really useful

I never feel the cold while running no matter how cold it gets, but I suppose you are never running harder than 7 Mph training and little wind to chill you, riding a bike anything up to 30 mph and you feel the chill. If anything I am going to over do the extra layers and even take a small rucksack if need be to hold stuff as I take clothing  off or even put more on, times do no matter,

If you focus on keeping your head and your feet warm and dry you should be able to get away with a lot less layers on your torso, which is good because it's horrible riding a bike when you are puffed up with clothing.

Edited by stop_the_craziness
  • Agree 1
  • Informative 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
nirvana

good stuff from @stop_the_craziness

I'd add some sort of mudguard, years ago I had a cheap plastic thing that bent and 'clipped' under the sadle, that was a mountain bike but I need something for a road bike cos even when it's stopped raining the amount of water on the road can give you a surprisingly 'damp crack' xD

Wind chill gets me at this time of year....start of my ride I go down a cat4 climb and even with 2 pairs of gloves I can get numb fingers after 10-15 mins :o And I wear glasses and those buggars chill the hell out of my ears too :S

yeah good lights a must! I bought a stonker off aliexpress, in fact I must get using it soon to blind some of the feckers....see how they like it back at em!

Good riding! Bon courage! Chapeau!

  • Agree 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Aye it's the windchill that's the killer on the bike. 

Went for a run today in shorts and single long sleeve top. Just gloves extra. 

Bit chilly for first k or so but then fine. 

  • Agree 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
haroldshand
16 hours ago, ccc said:

Aye it's the windchill that's the killer on the bike. 

Went for a run today in shorts and single long sleeve top. Just gloves extra. 

Bit chilly for first k or so but then fine. 

I love running in the worst of weathers along with the fact that my local 9 mile circumference lake is empty when the weather gets bad, one year there was a massive snow blizzard and I was the only one out, not only was the running conditions OK, they were better than OK and the powered snow was dry to run on and the atmosphere made it so enjoyable.

I just find with cycling once the cold gets inside you it stays

  • Agree 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
haroldshand

Got a 35 mile ride in yesterday and was close to freezing, only felt it on my hands a little by the end and that was without gloves which were there on standby if it got too bad. But just waiting for a freezing windy day to come, I think the art of this is good layers(not too many) and good windproof stuff that holds the heat.

Noticed my MPH average is down in the colder weather, not sure what I was expecting though in the colder weather, but who cares

  • Cheers 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
Melchett

Good stuff here.

All I’d add is for the winter on my road bike I switch to MTB pedals. A few reasons for this. You’re way more likely to have to walk for some reason, MTB pedals tend to be hardier, cheaper and more disposable and lastly... segueing to piece of advice 2: Invest in some winter cycling boots. Best winter cycling buy I’ve ever made. And if you buy the MTB version you can use one pair across all your bikes.

And lastly, Rule #9: if you are out riding in bad weather you are badass

https://www.velominati.com/comment-page-8/

  • Cheers 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
Melchett

Having perused all the other entries two more bits of advice and an observation:

I often use silk under gloves when it’s really cold. I got mine from Decathlon, probably from the ski section - not nearly as expensive as you’d think.

After a couple of winters of catastrophic ride (and tyre) ending punctures on the supposedly tough Gatorskins on road I decided ‘fuck this’ and switched to Schwalbe Marathons for winter use. If you can stand the mockery of those who’re too inexperienced to know better, do the same.

And the observation: yes, your speed will go down in winter. Accept it as part of life’s rich tapestry.

Edited by Melchett
  • Agree 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
Chewing Grass
14 minutes ago, Melchett said:

I often use silk under gloves when it’s really cold. I got mine from Decathlon, probably from the ski section - not nearly as expensive as you’d think.

After a couple of winters of catastrophic ride (and tyre) ending punctures on the supposedly tough Gatorskins on road I decided ‘fuck this’ and switched to Schwalbe Marathons for winter use. If you can stand the mockery of those who’re too inexperienced to know better, do the same.

Snap, I swear by Schwalbe Marathon Racers (the folding version not the cheap wired one) and use cold store gloves under my cycling ones, they work a treat and are dirt cheap.

 

  • Agree 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
Van Lady
8 hours ago, Chewing Grass said:

Its a battle between being too cold, sweating too much (and then getting cold).

This.

I do a bit of recreational cycling now but not much because my favourite is walking miles most days to shops and mainly recreationally.

It’s a constant challenge to get the clothing right to suit weather conditions.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Melchett

Base layer and a good winter top, something like a Foska toastie winter top, is all I need or want on the torso. If it’s too cold for just that then it’s probably icy out so too cold for safe road cycling. You might want to take an extra layer for if you have to stop for a protracted period, though. For instance, should your gatorskin tyre get a hole in it big enough to stick a pencil through and you need to wait for your other half to come pick you up in the car....

Link to post
Share on other sites
Hail the Tripod
1 hour ago, Melchett said:

wait for your other half to come pick you up in the car....

Having your girlfriend come pick you up is for poofs.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Chewing Grass
3 minutes ago, Hail the Tripod said:

Having your girlfriend come pick you up is for poofs.

Mrs Chewy would tell me to F-Off so I would never ask, walking 10 miles home only takes 3 hours carrying a bike.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Melchett
8 hours ago, Chewing Grass said:

Mrs Chewy would tell me to F-Off so I would never ask, walking 10 miles home only takes 3 hours carrying a bike.

You’re lucky if it’s only 10 miles.

Mostly I am self reliant. I’ve gone on with rides of over 20 miles to go with a broken seat post and with a broken rear derailleur and twice with one pedal. But sometimes you aren’t getting back under your own steam. 
 

Edited by Melchett
Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...