Jump to content
DOSBODS
  • Welcome to DOSBODS

     

    DOSBODS is free of any advertising.

    Ads are annoying, and - increasingly - advertising companies limit free speech online. DOSBODS Forums are completely free to use. Please create a free account to be able to access all the features of the DOSBODS community. It only takes 20 seconds!

     

Small Apartment Blocks and Noise


Recommended Posts

I live in a big, well built apartment block. There is no sound travelling from the flat below (that I can hear anyway).

However such flats are small with expensive Maintenance fees.

The top floor apartment in the building shown below is currently for sale. You get the entire floor to yourself; it’s a big flat and no lift and only 3 flats in the whole block so maintenance fees should be minimal....but I wonder would noise from the flat below travel well?

Basically are the floors between the flats in these little developments generally much thicker than the floors Between a normal house?

 

31375DB8-48E5-4724-9472-BC8E903DA39C.jpeg

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 102
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

In my experience most neighbors are awful. I'd do whatever you can to have as few as possible.  

My flat dwelling experience - two thereof - was that you get the most noise from the flat above (furniture moving, heavy footsteps), some from the side, and nothing from below (unless you have an argu

When you own a flat, it all depends on the neighbours. Neighbours move out and are replaced with new neighbours. It's a lottery. You might win, you might lose. And if you lose, you can

Posted Images

My flat dwelling experience - two thereof - was that you get the most noise from the flat above (furniture moving, heavy footsteps), some from the side, and nothing from below (unless you have an arguing couple or a pop music fan who plays it loud).

Having the entire top floor to yourself therefore sounds ideal.

Plus you get lower heating bills as the warmth rises from the flats below.

Usual caveats about whole block maintenance costs: who organises and who collects.

Especially so because if the roof starts leaking it won't bother the other two flat owners in the slightest.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Not in any way a position to buy, but these thoughts are on my mind too.

Moved at the start of August to a newish build and was concerned about noise.  There is absolutely nothing between flats it seems (neighbours below and beside both have dogs).  Really surprised.

Although internally the flat has almost no insulation weirdly.  Wouldn't notice if I was on my own, and not really a problem.  But say the hallway which is fairly large for a new build I suspect (or not small) every footstep echoes throughout.

I'm thinking it's to do with the laminate flooring and the way it's been laid. I'm sure it is not the original. 

Obviously a rug or carpet may help but not sure how much.

Sorry can't help but will be interesting hearing as I'm loving the cosiness and thermal insulation it brings as well as no neighbor voices or music once heard.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

My flat dwelling experience - two thereof - was that you get the most noise from the flat above (furniture moving, heavy footsteps), some from the side, and nothing from below (unless you have an arguing couple or a pop music fan who plays it loud).

Having the entire top floor to yourself therefore sounds ideal.

Plus you get lower heating bills as the warmth rises from the flats below.

Usual caveats about whole block maintenance costs: who organises and who collects.

Especially so because if the roof starts leaking it won't bother the other two flat owners in the slightest.

One thing I've heard here before is that in some builds (not sure circa when but before central heating was big) is that the previous insulation (tar or sooty stuff?) was henceforth removed to allow central heating pipes etc.  Only heard once but sounded genuine.

Definitely top floor you hear less I think (I do occasionally hear movement upstairs ie thudding footsteps - so not completely immune to noise but not below).  Would depend on flat, a friend with an ex council house is on the top floor and can hear a lot from below.  Think that's council houses often for you, especially if the previous insulation was removed like I described.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I think what’s also worth mentioning is this is a purpose built block AFAIK not a conversion.

My noise concerns came to mind because I’m at my parents house at the mo; a modern build 3 storey townhouse. The lounge is in the middle floor, and regardless of whether you are the floor above or below it even normal level talking and music can be heard.

Link to post
Share on other sites
59 minutes ago, JoeDavola said:

I live in a big, well built apartment block. There is no sound travelling from the flat below (that I can hear anyway).

However such flats are small with expensive Maintenance fees.

The top floor apartment in the building shown below is currently for sale. You get the entire floor to yourself; it’s a big flat and no lift and only 3 flats in the whole block so maintenance fees should be minimal....but I wonder would noise from the flat below travel well?

Basically are the floors between the flats in these little developments generally much thicker than the floors Between a normal house?

 

31375DB8-48E5-4724-9472-BC8E903DA39C.jpeg

Clearly I do not know anything about the construction of those particular flats, however, about 10 years ago we built the house that we now live in.

The first floor is a 175mm beam and block floor with a 60-70mm screed and then carpet onto of that.

It provides excellent soundproofing and when you are downstairs, you cannot hear what is going on upstairs. There is essentially no transmission of noise through the floor. I suppose if somebody where to be rearranging the furniture then you might hear something but as I cannot be in two places at once then I cannot comment.

 

 

Edited by Bornagain
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, JoeDavola said:

Is this something you could find out about a flat before you buy it? Doesn’t sound like something a ssurveyor could ‘measure’ as such.

If you could get hold of the original drawings and/or specs you would know for certain.

I would have thought that an experienced surveyor would probably be able to tell by inspection.

Building regs do set minimum standards for noise abatement through the floors but the only way to be sure is to go and try it out for yourself. Knock on the door of a first floor flat, ask them to turn the music up and see if you can here it upstairs.

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

@JoeDavola If you are seriously considering putting in an offer then I recommend that you have a chat with the neighbours first, especially the ground floor flat occupants. If the resident below is a noisy asshole who blasts out music at all hours then the build quality won't make a huge difference.

Also check nearby commercial buildings too and their usage. You don't want to be next door to a bar/nightclub or 24-hour gym thats pumping out loud music constantly.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
54 minutes ago, Bornagain said:

Clearly I do not know anything about the construction of those particular flats, however, about 10 years ago we built the house that we now live in.

The first floor is a 175mm beam and block floor with a 60-70mm screed and then carpet onto of that.

It provides excellent soundproofing and when you are downstairs, you cannot hear what is going on upstairs. There is essentially no transmission of noise through the floor. I suppose if somebody where to be rearranging the furniture then you might hear something but as I cannot be in two places at once then I cannot comment.

 

 

What does this look like ? 

Flat I rent just now is brutal for noise from above. I honestly think there's 5mm or so ceilling - then a full open gap with nothing present at all - then maybe 10mm MDF or whatever they use type flooring above. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

A mate of mine once lived alone, having bought on the middle floor of a small block. He said his lease required he laid carpets to reduce noise travelling downstairs. He always said this by way of a ‘but I couldn’t give a shit what it says’ type remark. He never did lay any carpets. 
 

And the moral of this tale is.....

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Melchett said:

A mate of mine once lived alone, having bought on the middle floor of a small block. He said his lease required he laid carpets to reduce noise travelling downstairs. He always said this by way of a ‘but I couldn’t give a shit what it says’ type remark. He never did lay any carpets. 
 

And the moral of this tale is.....

The moral of the tale is that an awful lot of people, in the UK at least, are supremely selfish and don't give a flying f**k about the impact they have on others. Never forget this when buying...

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Frank Hovis said:

Especially so because if the roof starts leaking it won't bother the other two flat owners in the slightest.

Im not sure that’s right.

I had a leasehold flat once and the lease clearly stated that all owners were jointly responsible for upkeep and repair costs of all external parts of the building, walls, hallway, even windows and certainly roof.

Id be surprised if this wasn’t the norm.

Edited by Mirror Mirror
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Mirror Mirror said:

Im not sure that’s right.

I had a leasehold flat once and the lease clearly stated that all owners were jointly responsible for upkeep and repair costs of all external parts of the building, walls, hallway, even windows and certainly roof.

Id be surprised if this wasn’t the norm.

Another big -ve for me.

Being beholden to the costs of other peoples' maintenance/refurb decisions or vanity project requirements.

Edited by Hopeful
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, JoeDavola said:

I live in a big, well built apartment block. There is no sound travelling from the flat below (that I can hear anyway).

However such flats are small with expensive Maintenance fees.

The top floor apartment in the building shown below is currently for sale. You get the entire floor to yourself; it’s a big flat and no lift and only 3 flats in the whole block so maintenance fees should be minimal....but I wonder would noise from the flat below travel well?

Basically are the floors between the flats in these little developments generally much thicker than the floors Between a normal house?

 

31375DB8-48E5-4724-9472-BC8E903DA39C.jpeg

Unless your the mole man it looks ok room wize

Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, Mirror Mirror said:

Im not sure that’s right.

I had a leasehold flat once and the lease clearly stated that all owners were jointly responsible for upkeep and repair costs of all external parts of the building, walls, hallway, even windows and certainly roof.

Id be surprised if this wasn’t the norm.

However you have to enforce it.

Matey in the first floor flat says "I have no money, I cannot pay".

What do you do then?

Take an equity charge on their lease perhaps?

Well fine, if you are personally regsitered with the Consumer Credit Authority.

Otherwise no; you can't.  And you still have no mney from them.

There are rules.

And then there are the practical enforcement of such rules.

I had a lease that said I had to clean the inside of the windows every six months.  But I didn't and nothing happened as a result.

Good luck in personally enforcing that clause.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.


×
×
  • Create New...