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Catalytic converter thefts - still fancy that hybrid?


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Catalytic converter car crime wave is spreading: It's already prevalent in London - but criminals are broadening target areas to other towns and cities

  • Figures received from police forces have shown a rise in catalytic converter thefts
  • In London - the hotspot for this type of crime -  there have been 15,237 cases of reported thefts of the devices
  • Police data revealed by Compare the Market show the worst-hit cities - and also where cases have risen most 
  • The emissions-reducing devices contain valuable metals that can easily be sold for profit by orgainsed gangs
  • Thieves are stripping them in broad daylight and doing significant damage that can even result in write offs 

 

Thieves even have models they've specifically earmarked for having the best-quality parts, according to insurer Admiral.

All are hybrid cars, which are ripe for thieves as the catalytic converters contain a higher concentration of precious metals and are generally less corroded. 

Admiral says data shows the most susceptible hybrid models are the Honda Jazz, Toyota Prius, Toyota Auris and Lexus RX of all generations and ages.

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/money/cars/article-9079033/The-latest-car-crime-spread-UK-2021.html

 

I've also read in previous articles that 4x4s are targeted - no jacking required.

 

This is however only the illegal side of the racket.

My old garage owner used to take every opportunity to have a rant about the nationals who would spuriously diagnose a catalytic converter as requiring replacement so would make the profit on the new one, plus profit on labour, and then have a valuable scrap part which they kept rather than returning to the owner.  Double bubble.

Though at least they didn't (usually) wreck your car in the process.

 

The article only mentions petrol engines (and hybrids) but modern diesels also have them as part of the DPF.  Does anybody know if diesels are less likely to be targeted for some reason as implied by the article: is the catalytic converter smaller / less valuable / harder to get to?

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49 minutes ago, Chewing Grass said:

There is more stuff in the way on Diesels so it takes longer to nick.

Also, at the current metals prices petrol converters will be more valuable than diesel as they're likely to be Pd, whereas the diesel catalyst is more likely to be Pt. 

I still don't really understand how they're getti g the material back into the supply chain though. You can't just sell it to a refiner, so there must be dodgy intermediates involved somewhere. 

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I got £670 for a scrap cat a couple of months back, from a 2.0T petrol.

I bought the whole car for £1200 to get the engine, box and various other bits I needed for an engine conversion into another car, broke the rest of the car for about £1000, plus the £670 on top. Fucking great.

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5 minutes ago, Roger_Mellie said:

Also, at the current metals prices petrol converters will be more valuable than diesel as they're likely to be Pd, whereas the diesel catalyst is more likely to be Pt. 

I still don't really understand how they're getti g the material back into the supply chain though. You can't just sell it to a refiner, so there must be dodgy intermediates involved somewhere. 

Maybe the point I noted about the national chains removing them unnecessarily has relevance; get a bent employee there to sell them to the scrap dealer on top of their own removals and fiddle the books accordingly.

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7 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

Maybe the point I noted about the national chains removing them unnecessarily has relevance; get a bent employee there to sell them to the scrap dealer on top of their own removals and fiddle the books accordingly.

Scammers everywhere @Frank Hovis. A mate of mine wanted his guitar amp fixed. It's an old one with valves. The "shop" wanted to replace the valves, but all it took was a few capacitors. They wanted the original RCA valves, and would sell you Chinese replacements which aren't as good.

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2 minutes ago, MrPin said:

Scammers everywhere @Frank Hovis. A mate of mine wanted his guitar amp fixed. It's an old one with valves. The "shop" wanted to replace the valves, but all it took was a few capacitors. They wanted the original RCA valves, and would sell you Chinese replacements which aren't as good.

I have also heard of dodgy garages swapping a decent spare for a knackered one and relying upon the car owner not checking beneath the carpet.

Whilst I trust my garage I have for years made a point of clearing out everything from the car and boot (parcel shelf, plastic liner and carpet); partly to make it quicker for them but also so that I can see the toolkit and spare tyre at a glance when I pick it up. 

 

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1 hour ago, Frank Hovis said:

Catalytic converter car crime wave is spreading: It's already prevalent in London - but criminals are broadening target areas to other towns and cities

  • Figures received from police forces have shown a rise in catalytic converter thefts
  • In London - the hotspot for this type of crime -  there have been 15,237 cases of reported thefts of the devices
  • Police data revealed by Compare the Market show the worst-hit cities - and also where cases have risen most 
  • The emissions-reducing devices contain valuable metals that can easily be sold for profit by orgainsed gangs
  • Thieves are stripping them in broad daylight and doing significant damage that can even result in write offs 

 

Thieves even have models they've specifically earmarked for having the best-quality parts, according to insurer Admiral.

All are hybrid cars, which are ripe for thieves as the catalytic converters contain a higher concentration of precious metals and are generally less corroded. 

Admiral says data shows the most susceptible hybrid models are the Honda Jazz, Toyota Prius, Toyota Auris and Lexus RX of all generations and ages.

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/money/cars/article-9079033/The-latest-car-crime-spread-UK-2021.html

 

I've also read in previous articles that 4x4s are targeted - no jacking required.

 

This is however only the illegal side of the racket.

My old garage owner used to take every opportunity to have a rant about the nationals who would spuriously diagnose a catalytic converter as requiring replacement so would make the profit on the new one, plus profit on labour, and then have a valuable scrap part which they kept rather than returning to the owner.  Double bubble.

Though at least they didn't (usually) wreck your car in the process.

 

The article only mentions petrol engines (and hybrids) but modern diesels also have them as part of the DPF.  Does anybody know if diesels are less likely to be targeted for some reason as implied by the article: is the catalytic converter smaller / less valuable / harder to get to?

How much do they fetch

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You are blessed to find a good garage @Frank Hovis. I had good bloke in Clevedon, but he retired and shut down. He was no cheaper than anyone else, but did a thorough job. I've found a good one here now. They have been trading for some time, and are a bit small, but I liked them immediately.

It's the "main dealers" that try to trick you.

Just now, stokiescum said:

How much do they fetch

How many have you got?:S

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Just now, Sucralose Ray Leonard said:

Is a new Cat worth more than an old one, or does it make little difference?

I have a banger that im trying to keep going until it becomes economically unviable.

I don't know the market for used cats. Perhaps somebody here knows?

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3 minutes ago, MrPin said:

You are blessed to find a good garage @Frank Hovis. I had good bloke in Clevedon, but he retired and shut down. He was no cheaper than anyone else, but did a thorough job. I've found a good one here now. They have been trading for some time, and are a bit small, but I liked them immediately.

It's the "main dealers" that try to trick you.

How many have you got?:S

Is it worth becoming a Fagan type carrector and giveing young urchins gainfull employment in the exhaust market

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2 minutes ago, Sucralose Ray Leonard said:

Is a new Cat worth more than an old one, or does it make little difference?

I have a banger that im trying to keep going until it becomes economically unviable.

Varies a lot, had quite a conversation with a chap who scraps cars, the amount of valuable metals varies a lot from one design to another, generally their usage has become more efficient on newer cars with less value in them, however they do break down, so an old cat that is breaking down and the matrix has already largely gone from the box and is nowonthe roadside is obviously  no worth so much. Scrappies and refiners do generally make checks, a lot could be stacked into containers and sent anywhere in the world- the volume of thefts is high enough,

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