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The property market in the EU


Democorruptcy
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Democorruptcy

What happens to this then?

The stamp duty holiday created more interest in our property market and usually that spills over into places like Spain, France, etc.

Now we have Brexited and less people travelling due to covid, will the British buyers dry up or is there pent up demand waiting to get over there?

The 90 days in 180 days rule applies to Brits.

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Yadda yadda yadda
1 hour ago, Democorruptcy said:

What happens to this then?

The stamp duty holiday created more interest in our property market and usually that spills over into places like Spain, France, etc.

Now we have Brexited and less people travelling due to covid, will the British buyers dry up or is there pent up demand waiting to get over there?

The 90 days in 180 days rule applies to Brits.

Who would buy a holiday home during lockdown whilst there is no end date in sight? Only someone who thinks they're getting a bargain. Not just the British but everyone. The Germans and the Dutch won't be buying. You might get French buying in France, etc.

There will also be forced sales. All the ingredients are there for a crash. The longer it goes on the more likely a crash is. I wonder about maintenance on properties that haven't been occupied for a year. Although somewhere like Spain I expect distressed property could be snapped up through cosy deals. At least for a while.

Long term there will probably be less British demand from retirees.

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Reminded of this article

Not all second home owners are rich – these post-Brexit travel rules will punish our hard work

The French Government must recognise the contributions of second home owners

Judith Dowden 31 December 2020 • 3:22pm

'This is not a “holiday house” – it’s our second home. We are not tourists' Credit: istock

Perhaps there is a misconception that anyone who owns a second home abroad is stinking rich. Well, as retired teachers we most definitely are not.

However, in order to fulfil a lifelong dream, savings, loans and priorities can be arranged, and sacrifices endured. We are certainly not awash with money, and we prioritise our lives accordingly.

We had always been enormous devotees of France – all the usual stuff: the food, the weather, the language, the lifestyle and yes, the French. Working in education gave us the opportunity in holiday times to meander from Loire to Languedoc at leisure, staying in tents, cheap-as-frites pensions with carpet up the walls, plus the odd treat night in an elegant Château. 

When we had the opportunity and knew that retirement beckoned, we took the leap and found an affordable, dilapidated townhouse in a small village down South in glorious Occitanie. This is not a 'holiday house': it’s our second home. We are not tourists. We pay our French rates, tax, bills, insurance etc – all year round.

But now, we are staring down the barrel of the post-Brexit travel rules: after December 31, we will need a visa to stay for longer than 90 days in any 180-day period. 

There is already speculation that visas will be complicated to acquire, and will incur a not insubstantial annual fee – if you are fortunate enough to be granted one. For the vast majority of second home owners all over Europe, this money – on top of the bills we already pay – would make maintaining our continental bolt holes financially unsustainable. In addition, given all this, how would we now even be able to sell them on? 

And what if there’s a problem with the house? If we’re past our 'sell-by date', we wouldn’t be able to hop on a cheap Ryanair flight and sort it out. Also, this time limit applies within the whole of the Schengen area, so if we went to a wedding in Portugal or a weekend in Barcelona it would cut down even more on the time we’re allowed to spend in our own beloved home in France.

'We are embedded in the local community and take an active part in local events, culture and commerce' Credit: Judith Dowden

We were desperately hoping for some kind of bilateral agreement, allowing people like us to stay longer than 90 days. 

We do not wish to apply for French residency. We love our English lives, family and friends and need to maintain it as our primary residence. But keeping a foot in each camp is not unreasonable. Nor do we want to sell the French house that we have lovingly restored, or give up the fantastic friends of all nationalities that we’ve grown so fond of there. 

We are embedded in the local community and take an active part in local events. We contribute both to culture and commerce: we spend money in the shops, DIY stores, restaurants, cafés, and supermarkets. My husband is an artist who exhibits in our area. I regularly contribute to a local online magazine. We introduce our guests to the region and when they can’t stay with us, they book into the local B&Bs and hotels.

Restoring our house has been a labour of love – there were cobwebs to clear, splintered shutters to mend, mouldy walls to paint. But it was romantic and fun, with the reward of a sun-infused aperitif in our tiny courtyard. And we were in no rush; we had plenty of time. 

Formerly known as the Languedoc, this is wine country, the Minervois region – with vineyards stretching into the distance, infinite rows of vines wearing different coloured jackets depending on the season.

Where the vineyards end, lush forests, snowy mountains, thyme-studded garrigue and Mediterranean beaches begin. 

Now, in the long, languorous Summer months we cook for friends, cycle off to soirées, join convoys of bikes along the Canal du Midi, pack communal picnics and pick grapes for vigneron pals. Some are our French neighbours, some resident ex-pats and some in our position – a leg in each half of the pantalon of cross-Channel life. Most are retirees of a similar age and circumstance.

Read more: Will your passport be valid for travel to the EU after Brexit?

After lifetimes of meetings, stress and deadlines, we are all making the most of our freedom, physical ability to travel, and remaining quality time. 

In the winter months, when we get an alert for a bargain flight, it’s shorter visits filled with log fires, hot cheese, frosty walks, steaming cassoulet and scurrying through dark cobbled streets for vin chaud. Then home to England and our families, old pals, cosy pubs, clubs and part time jobs. 

We travel back and forth enjoying both of the lives that we’ve worked so hard to achieve, when we like, for as long as we like. Or at least... we did. 

Judith Dowden is the author of Chez Mwah: How to Languish in the Languedoc

 

One. work out how much that teachers pension woudl cost in terms of an endowment. Then come back and decide is you are rich or not.

http://www.frenchvillagediaries.com/2018/04/lazy-sunday-in-france-with-judith-dowden.html

Passionate about everything French: life in Poitou-Charentes, cycling in France, food in France, travel in France and book reviews on a French theme.

 

Strange that. She says that shes passionate about all things French.

High taxes, of a wealth destroying, effort sapping level are very very French.

Cant have frites without the tax bill love.

Her solution is to get a visa then.

 

 

 

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Diddums.......I bet she's a woke greenie too except flitting back and forth across the channel doesn't really fit with that does it?

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King Penda
46 minutes ago, spygirl said:

Reminded of this article

Not all second home owners are rich – these post-Brexit travel rules will punish our hard work

The French Government must recognise the contributions of second home owners

Judith Dowden 31 December 2020 • 3:22pm

'This is not a “holiday house” – it’s our second home. We are not tourists' Credit: istock

Perhaps there is a misconception that anyone who owns a second home abroad is stinking rich. Well, as retired teachers we most definitely are not.

However, in order to fulfil a lifelong dream, savings, loans and priorities can be arranged, and sacrifices endured. We are certainly not awash with money, and we prioritise our lives accordingly.

We had always been enormous devotees of France – all the usual stuff: the food, the weather, the language, the lifestyle and yes, the French. Working in education gave us the opportunity in holiday times to meander from Loire to Languedoc at leisure, staying in tents, cheap-as-frites pensions with carpet up the walls, plus the odd treat night in an elegant Château. 

When we had the opportunity and knew that retirement beckoned, we took the leap and found an affordable, dilapidated townhouse in a small village down South in glorious Occitanie. This is not a 'holiday house': it’s our second home. We are not tourists. We pay our French rates, tax, bills, insurance etc – all year round.

But now, we are staring down the barrel of the post-Brexit travel rules: after December 31, we will need a visa to stay for longer than 90 days in any 180-day period. 

There is already speculation that visas will be complicated to acquire, and will incur a not insubstantial annual fee – if you are fortunate enough to be granted one. For the vast majority of second home owners all over Europe, this money – on top of the bills we already pay – would make maintaining our continental bolt holes financially unsustainable. In addition, given all this, how would we now even be able to sell them on? 

And what if there’s a problem with the house? If we’re past our 'sell-by date', we wouldn’t be able to hop on a cheap Ryanair flight and sort it out. Also, this time limit applies within the whole of the Schengen area, so if we went to a wedding in Portugal or a weekend in Barcelona it would cut down even more on the time we’re allowed to spend in our own beloved home in France.

'We are embedded in the local community and take an active part in local events, culture and commerce' Credit: Judith Dowden

We were desperately hoping for some kind of bilateral agreement, allowing people like us to stay longer than 90 days. 

We do not wish to apply for French residency. We love our English lives, family and friends and need to maintain it as our primary residence. But keeping a foot in each camp is not unreasonable. Nor do we want to sell the French house that we have lovingly restored, or give up the fantastic friends of all nationalities that we’ve grown so fond of there. 

We are embedded in the local community and take an active part in local events. We contribute both to culture and commerce: we spend money in the shops, DIY stores, restaurants, cafés, and supermarkets. My husband is an artist who exhibits in our area. I regularly contribute to a local online magazine. We introduce our guests to the region and when they can’t stay with us, they book into the local B&Bs and hotels.

Restoring our house has been a labour of love – there were cobwebs to clear, splintered shutters to mend, mouldy walls to paint. But it was romantic and fun, with the reward of a sun-infused aperitif in our tiny courtyard. And we were in no rush; we had plenty of time. 

Formerly known as the Languedoc, this is wine country, the Minervois region – with vineyards stretching into the distance, infinite rows of vines wearing different coloured jackets depending on the season.

Where the vineyards end, lush forests, snowy mountains, thyme-studded garrigue and Mediterranean beaches begin. 

Now, in the long, languorous Summer months we cook for friends, cycle off to soirées, join convoys of bikes along the Canal du Midi, pack communal picnics and pick grapes for vigneron pals. Some are our French neighbours, some resident ex-pats and some in our position – a leg in each half of the pantalon of cross-Channel life. Most are retirees of a similar age and circumstance.

Read more: Will your passport be valid for travel to the EU after Brexit?

After lifetimes of meetings, stress and deadlines, we are all making the most of our freedom, physical ability to travel, and remaining quality time. 

In the winter months, when we get an alert for a bargain flight, it’s shorter visits filled with log fires, hot cheese, frosty walks, steaming cassoulet and scurrying through dark cobbled streets for vin chaud. Then home to England and our families, old pals, cosy pubs, clubs and part time jobs. 

We travel back and forth enjoying both of the lives that we’ve worked so hard to achieve, when we like, for as long as we like. Or at least... we did. 

Judith Dowden is the author of Chez Mwah: How to Languish in the Languedoc

 

One. work out how much that teachers pension woudl cost in terms of an endowment. Then come back and decide is you are rich or not.

http://www.frenchvillagediaries.com/2018/04/lazy-sunday-in-france-with-judith-dowden.html

Passionate about everything French: life in Poitou-Charentes, cycling in France, food in France, travel in France and book reviews on a French theme.

 

Strange that. She says that shes passionate about all things French.

High taxes, of a wealth destroying, effort sapping level are very very French.

Cant have frites without the tax bill love.

Her solution is to get a visa then.

 

 

 

Fuck her lol

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Yadda yadda yadda
6 hours ago, spygirl said:

Reminded of this article

Not all second home owners are rich – these post-Brexit travel rules will punish our hard work

The French Government must recognise the contributions of second home owners

Judith Dowden 31 December 2020 • 3:22pm

'This is not a “holiday house” – it’s our second home. We are not tourists' Credit: istock

Perhaps there is a misconception that anyone who owns a second home abroad is stinking rich. Well, as retired teachers we most definitely are not.

However, in order to fulfil a lifelong dream, savings, loans and priorities can be arranged, and sacrifices endured. We are certainly not awash with money, and we prioritise our lives accordingly.

We had always been enormous devotees of France – all the usual stuff: the food, the weather, the language, the lifestyle and yes, the French. Working in education gave us the opportunity in holiday times to meander from Loire to Languedoc at leisure, staying in tents, cheap-as-frites pensions with carpet up the walls, plus the odd treat night in an elegant Château. 

When we had the opportunity and knew that retirement beckoned, we took the leap and found an affordable, dilapidated townhouse in a small village down South in glorious Occitanie. This is not a 'holiday house': it’s our second home. We are not tourists. We pay our French rates, tax, bills, insurance etc – all year round.

But now, we are staring down the barrel of the post-Brexit travel rules: after December 31, we will need a visa to stay for longer than 90 days in any 180-day period. 

There is already speculation that visas will be complicated to acquire, and will incur a not insubstantial annual fee – if you are fortunate enough to be granted one. For the vast majority of second home owners all over Europe, this money – on top of the bills we already pay – would make maintaining our continental bolt holes financially unsustainable. In addition, given all this, how would we now even be able to sell them on? 

And what if there’s a problem with the house? If we’re past our 'sell-by date', we wouldn’t be able to hop on a cheap Ryanair flight and sort it out. Also, this time limit applies within the whole of the Schengen area, so if we went to a wedding in Portugal or a weekend in Barcelona it would cut down even more on the time we’re allowed to spend in our own beloved home in France.

'We are embedded in the local community and take an active part in local events, culture and commerce' Credit: Judith Dowden

We were desperately hoping for some kind of bilateral agreement, allowing people like us to stay longer than 90 days. 

We do not wish to apply for French residency. We love our English lives, family and friends and need to maintain it as our primary residence. But keeping a foot in each camp is not unreasonable. Nor do we want to sell the French house that we have lovingly restored, or give up the fantastic friends of all nationalities that we’ve grown so fond of there. 

We are embedded in the local community and take an active part in local events. We contribute both to culture and commerce: we spend money in the shops, DIY stores, restaurants, cafés, and supermarkets. My husband is an artist who exhibits in our area. I regularly contribute to a local online magazine. We introduce our guests to the region and when they can’t stay with us, they book into the local B&Bs and hotels.

Restoring our house has been a labour of love – there were cobwebs to clear, splintered shutters to mend, mouldy walls to paint. But it was romantic and fun, with the reward of a sun-infused aperitif in our tiny courtyard. And we were in no rush; we had plenty of time. 

Formerly known as the Languedoc, this is wine country, the Minervois region – with vineyards stretching into the distance, infinite rows of vines wearing different coloured jackets depending on the season.

Where the vineyards end, lush forests, snowy mountains, thyme-studded garrigue and Mediterranean beaches begin. 

Now, in the long, languorous Summer months we cook for friends, cycle off to soirées, join convoys of bikes along the Canal du Midi, pack communal picnics and pick grapes for vigneron pals. Some are our French neighbours, some resident ex-pats and some in our position – a leg in each half of the pantalon of cross-Channel life. Most are retirees of a similar age and circumstance.

Read more: Will your passport be valid for travel to the EU after Brexit?

After lifetimes of meetings, stress and deadlines, we are all making the most of our freedom, physical ability to travel, and remaining quality time. 

In the winter months, when we get an alert for a bargain flight, it’s shorter visits filled with log fires, hot cheese, frosty walks, steaming cassoulet and scurrying through dark cobbled streets for vin chaud. Then home to England and our families, old pals, cosy pubs, clubs and part time jobs. 

We travel back and forth enjoying both of the lives that we’ve worked so hard to achieve, when we like, for as long as we like. Or at least... we did. 

Judith Dowden is the author of Chez Mwah: How to Languish in the Languedoc

 

One. work out how much that teachers pension woudl cost in terms of an endowment. Then come back and decide is you are rich or not.

http://www.frenchvillagediaries.com/2018/04/lazy-sunday-in-france-with-judith-dowden.html

Passionate about everything French: life in Poitou-Charentes, cycling in France, food in France, travel in France and book reviews on a French theme.

 

Strange that. She says that shes passionate about all things French.

High taxes, of a wealth destroying, effort sapping level are very very French.

Cant have frites without the tax bill love.

Her solution is to get a visa then.

 

 

 

Fucking hell. They can spend up to half their time there with no extra paperwork. If it truly is a 2nd home then that won't be a problem. What are they whinging on about? Oh yes, they're whiny remoaners.

If they really think they might end up spending more than 90 days there in one 180 day period then just apply for the residency. They won't lose their English passports. They have all the proof of residency they need. Do they think they would have to declare it as a main home to the local mayor's office and pay a bit more tax? Oh dear, nevermind.

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Yadda yadda yadda
3 minutes ago, DTMark said:

That is a sustained and significant decline. They're using a point instead of a comma, typical continentals, so a 100 sq metre place is 191,000 euros. On average. I bet that is skewed upwards by the top end in the most pricey cities. Some areas must be very affordable if you have a job.

Although I don't understand the bit about stati richiesti. If that is the price in the richest parts of Italy then it is surprisingly affordable.

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4 minutes ago, Yadda yadda yadda said:

That is a sustained and significant decline. They're using a point instead of a comma, typical continentals, so a 100 sq metre place is 191,000 euros. On average. I bet that is skewed upwards by the top end in the most pricey cities. Some areas must be very affordable if you have a job.

Although I don't understand the bit about stati richiesti. If that is the price in the richest parts of Italy then it is surprisingly affordable.

It literally translates as "been requested" so I guess it means asking (not sold) prices?

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Yadda yadda yadda
1 minute ago, DTMark said:

It literally translates as "been requested" so I guess it means asking (not sold) prices?

Shows why I shouldn't just guess what is written in foreign languages.

I'm surprised that they have fallen so much in recent years. Didn't realise.

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Why is it always fucking teachers who have second homes in France? Cunts always bleating for more pay while most workers can't afford one house here yet alone 2 in 2 different countries. Cunts.

Edited by gibbon
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47 minutes ago, Yadda yadda yadda said:

Shows why I shouldn't just guess what is written in foreign languages.

I'm surprised that they have fallen so much in recent years. Didn't realise.

In December 2020, residential properties for sale had average asking prices of € 1,910 per square meter, with an increase of 1.65% compared to December 2019 (€ 1,879 / m²). In the last 2 years, the average price in Italy reached its maximum in September 2012, with a value of € 2,505 per square meter. The month in which the lowest price was requested was December 2019: an average of € 1,879 per square meter was requested for a property for sale.

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Democorruptcy
10 hours ago, Yadda yadda yadda said:

Who would buy a holiday home during lockdown whilst there is no end date in sight? Only someone who thinks they're getting a bargain. Not just the British but everyone. The Germans and the Dutch won't be buying. You might get French buying in France, etc.

There will also be forced sales. All the ingredients are there for a crash. The longer it goes on the more likely a crash is. I wonder about maintenance on properties that haven't been occupied for a year. Although somewhere like Spain I expect distressed property could be snapped up through cosy deals. At least for a while.

Long term there will probably be less British demand from retirees.

It doesn't have to be an holiday home. The Germans and Dutch still have freedom of movement and if they want to use it, they should be one of the beneficiaries if there are less British buyers to outbid them.

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10 hours ago, gibbon said:

Why is it always fucking teachers who have second homes in France? Cunts always bleating for more pay while most workers can't afford one house here yet alone 2 in 2 different countries. Cunts.

Because -

They have lots of holidays. Seriously. about 3 times more than anyone else.

They get paid lots for little input.

Anyone who can piss off for 6 weeks in summer and work on a house is not a hard working professional, its someone with lots of time and money at hand.

The get a gold plater pension.

 

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11 hours ago, Yadda yadda yadda said:

Shows why I shouldn't just guess what is written in foreign languages.

I'm surprised that they have fallen so much in recent years. Didn't realise.

People are looking at stuff thru the gormless mania of property obsessed Brit eyes.

Property is cheap outside of Europes commercially active area.

Go 20ks outside of the main Italian towns and you buy a rural house for less than the cost of the mortar between the bricks.

Off course you may find yourself taking on a commitment to pay for all over 50s in the village. EU property law and taxes are very obscure, mental, and very high.

Id not consider buying any property outside of the lawful, well run EU countries with functioning, transparent legal systems.

Thats just Holland, Germany and the Nordics.

The rest, inc France, are a bunch of 3rd world, scammers.

Going back to Einstein - teachers are much more propertee obssessed than averagebrits.

 

When we had the opportunity and knew that retirement beckoned, we took the leap and found an affordable, dilapidated townhouse in a small village down South in glorious Occitanie. This is not a 'holiday house': it’s our second home. We are not tourists. We pay our French rates, tax, bills, insurance etc – all year round.

...

or the vast majority of second home owners all over Europe, this money – on top of the bills we already pay – would make maintaining our continental bolt holes financially unsustainable. In addition, given all this, how would we now even be able to sell them on? 

 

....

We do not wish to apply for French residency. We love our English lives, family and friends and need to maintain it as our primary residence. But keeping a foot in each camp is not unreasonable. Nor do we want to sell the French house that we have lovingly restored, or give up the fantastic friends of all nationalities that we’ve grown so fond of there. 

...

Restoring our house has been a labour of love – there were cobwebs to clear, splintered shutters to mend, mouldy walls to paint. But it was romantic and fun, with the reward of a sun-infused aperitif in our tiny courtyard. And we were in no rush; we had plenty of time. 

...

Formerly known as the Languedoc, this is wine country, the Minervois region – with vineyards stretching into the distance, infinite rows of vines wearing different coloured jackets depending on the season.

Where the vineyards end, lush forests, snowy mountains, thyme-studded garrigue and Mediterranean beaches begin. 

...

Now, in the long, languorous Summer months we cook for friends, cycle off to soirées, join convoys of bikes along the Canal du Midi, pack communal picnics and pick grapes for vigneron pals. Some are our French neighbours, some resident ex-pats and some in our position – a leg in each half of the pantalon of cross-Channel life. Most are retirees of a similar age and circumstance.

.. repeating this:

There is already speculation that visas will be complicated to acquire, and will incur a not insubstantial annual fee – if you are fortunate enough to be granted one. For the vast majority of second home owners all over Europe, this money – on top of the bills we already pay – would make maintaining our continental bolt holes financially unsustainable. In addition, given all this, how would we now even be able to sell them on? 

 

Oh dear. Shes brough money into it.

The reaso nthey bought this run down townhouse sooo cheaply was becasue its not economically viable for the young Jean, whos having to slave away in private sector, [paying for both his bloated, rarely working public sector types *AND* British public sector, who want to pis around playing at being French.

Its Jean now (no longer getting much German tax money) who has to pay for that Famer and his 20 sheep.

Agriculture esp, the 20 sheep and a duck sort *DOES NOT GENERATE JOBS AND MONEY FFS.

Its one great big tax sink.

Dafty wont sell the house because no fucker wants to buy it.

The only  market for these rural houses is daft early retired English teachers.

 

 

 

 

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Don Coglione
19 hours ago, spygirl said:

After lifetimes of meetings, stress and deadlines...

...enjoying both of the lives that we’ve worked so hard to achieve.

Fucking kill them both. Now.

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27 minutes ago, Knickerless Turgid said:

Fucking kill them both. Now.

An long retired teacher lives near my mum.

We were chatting about life n stuff.

He was going - Its hard for the kids. What could I do to help them?

I suggested he die.

He took early retirement, on health grounds in the early 90s.

... After a 20 years  of teaching.

 

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1 hour ago, spygirl said:

Restoring our house has been a labour of love – there were cobwebs to clear, splintered shutters to mend, mouldy walls to paint. 

Restoration my fat one!

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Castlevania
14 hours ago, Yadda yadda yadda said:

Fucking hell. They can spend up to half their time there with no extra paperwork. If it truly is a 2nd home then that won't be a problem. What are they whinging on about? Oh yes, they're whiny remoaners.

If they really think they might end up spending more than 90 days there in one 180 day period then just apply for the residency. They won't lose their English passports. They have all the proof of residency they need. Do they think they would have to declare it as a main home to the local mayor's office and pay a bit more tax? Oh dear, nevermind.

They might then need to pay higher French income taxes on their U.K. income.

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Yadda yadda yadda
11 minutes ago, Castlevania said:

They might then need to pay higher French income taxes on their U.K. income.

Yes. Instead of paying tax of 20% on income exceeding £12,500 each they would likely be paying 11% from around 25,000 euros joint and would easily, on teachers pensions, be paying the 30% rate.

If they have £60k coming in between them they'll be paying £7k tax here. Judging by  the link below 66k euros would give a tax bill of 8,088, so not much higher. However, they would also be paying social charges at rates up to 8.3%. I reckon that would be approximately 3,000 euros more. No wonder they don't want to be tax resident in France.

Takes the piss really. They want the benefits of high tax France, including low property prices, whilst avoiding those taxes and retaining the benefits of UK wealth building. What is the betting they were spending more time in France than the UK anyway?

https://www.french-property.com/guides/france/finance-taxation/taxation/calculation-tax-liability/rates/

There is a link in that article to social charges. You have to hand it to French bureaucracy, they know how to make something like tax complicated. No wonder we use a French origin word for the concept.

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9 minutes ago, Yadda yadda yadda said:

Yes. Instead of paying tax of 20% on income exceeding £12,500 each they would likely be paying 11% from around 25,000 euros joint and would easily, on teachers pensions, be paying the 30% rate.

If they have £60k coming in between them they'll be paying £7k tax here. Judging by  the link below 66k euros would give a tax bill of 8,088, so not much higher. However, they would also be paying social charges at rates up to 8.3%. I reckon that would be approximately 3,000 euros more. No wonder they don't want to be tax resident in France.

Takes the piss really. They want the benefits of high tax France, including low property prices, whilst avoiding those taxes and retaining the benefits of UK wealth building. What is the betting they were spending more time in France than the UK anyway?

https://www.french-property.com/guides/france/finance-taxation/taxation/calculation-tax-liability/rates/

There is a link in that article to social charges. You have to hand it to French bureaucracy, they know how to make something like tax complicated. No wonder we use a French origin word for the concept.

Less confusing, more all consuming.

The French tax system appears to be designed to take pretty much all your money.

The only way you can make France 'work'; is if you have kids and public sector income, so you get some back in services and income.

If you pay all the Italian taxes youll end up paying more than 100% of your income. They are that nuts.

Give them a few year and theyll be complaining about how much tax he state takes.

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Castlevania
1 hour ago, Yadda yadda yadda said:

Yes. Instead of paying tax of 20% on income exceeding £12,500 each they would likely be paying 11% from around 25,000 euros joint and would easily, on teachers pensions, be paying the 30% rate.

If they have £60k coming in between them they'll be paying £7k tax here. Judging by  the link below 66k euros would give a tax bill of 8,088, so not much higher. However, they would also be paying social charges at rates up to 8.3%. I reckon that would be approximately 3,000 euros more. No wonder they don't want to be tax resident in France.

Takes the piss really. They want the benefits of high tax France, including low property prices, whilst avoiding those taxes and retaining the benefits of UK wealth building. What is the betting they were spending more time in France than the UK anyway?

https://www.french-property.com/guides/france/finance-taxation/taxation/calculation-tax-liability/rates/

There is a link in that article to social charges. You have to hand it to French bureaucracy, they know how to make something like tax complicated. No wonder we use a French origin word for the concept.

Thinking about it in addition to the above if they’d never worked in France then as residents they’d probably need to pay for health insurance, which at their age is unlikely to be cheap.

Edited by Castlevania
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Yadda yadda yadda
7 minutes ago, Castlevania said:

Thinking about it in addition to the above if they’d never worked in France then as residents they’d probably need to pay for health insurance, which at their age is unlikely to be cheap.

If they had filled in an S1 form prior to this year they would get the basic health cover but would still have to pay the top up insurance. On the presumption that they have been relying on EHIC cover up to now then they could have a big cost to find.

I expect there are quite a few people who are filling in forms over the next 6 months and will be surprised when they start paying more tax.

This couple will just have to ensure they spend slightly more time in the UK than in France. They are really completely unaware of how well off they are.

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Green Devil
On 02/01/2021 at 21:45, gibbon said:

Why is it always fucking teachers who have second homes in France? Cunts always bleating for more pay while most workers can't afford one house here yet alone 2 in 2 different countries. Cunts.

Didn't you know they are Entitled. 

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