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The establishment appears to be on the verge of eating itself. I thought striking was for the plebs. Clearly, I am wrong 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-43594546

Barristers are to go on strike over "relentless" cuts which have left the criminal justice system "broken".

The Criminal Bar Association (CBA), which represents criminal lawyers in England and Wales, is advising its members take part in "days of action".

It also recommends its members refuse all legal aid cases from 1 April when a new fees system comes into force.

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Org thread stuck   This story: With delays of up to four years for even straightforward cases, some barristers say their pay works out below an hourly minimum wage. BBC home affai

I saw a barrister on Twitter saying they had no money to pay the self assessment at the end of the month. I suspect law is one of those professions with many at either ends doing poorly or well off. 

To grant me custody of the child it’s going to cost 25k her solicitor another 25k for the xs.then the council ie social services has to have a brief.add all the costs you don’t realise like social wor

1 minute ago, TheBlueCat said:

They are not on the side of the little people. They can go fuck themselves  

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4 minutes ago, One percent said:

The establishment appears to be on the verge of eating itself. I thought striking was for the plebs. Clearly, I am wrong 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-43594546

Barristers are to go on strike over "relentless" cuts which have left the criminal justice system "broken".

The Criminal Bar Association (CBA), which represents criminal lawyers in England and Wales, is advising its members take part in "days of action".

It also recommends its members refuse all legal aid cases from 1 April when a new fees system comes into force.

BIB. They’re only whining because cuts to accessing taxpayers money is applying to them now!

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The ptoblem law pros has is tgat the number of law grads is huge.

10,000 pile into Unis to start their legal career.

Then only a few get a training contract.

Their argument might hold some grounds is their was a shortage of lawyers or barristers. There isnt.

Law does not attract clever people, idiots in the main. David Lammy.

Years ago, I was talking to someone whos daughter was off to study law at some ex pokl.

Shes made, the parent said.

No shes not, i thought. Id been chatting to one o the few grads from Durham uni law degree who managed to get a teaining contract. 50% of her class failed to achieve that. Im guessing the figures for unis outside of the top ones are dire.

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7 minutes ago, spygirl said:

The ptoblem law pros has is tgat the number of law grads is huge.

10,000 pile into Unis to start their legal career.

Then only a few get a training contract.

Their argument might hold some grounds is their was a shortage of lawyers or barristers. There isnt.

Law does not attract clever people, idiots in the main. David Lammy.

Years ago, I was talking to someone whos daughter was off to study law at some ex pokl.

Shes made, the parent said.

No shes not, i thought. Id been chatting to one o the few grads from Durham uni law degree who managed to get a teaining contract. 50% of her class failed to achieve that. Im guessing the figures for unis outside of the top ones are dire.

There are law A levels now. 

Im not sure I understand how it has traditionally worked, but I think that people would do a general degree, any degree, then do a years conversion course. 

Doing A levels and then a degree in law is going to limit your choices. 

What the fuck do you do if you don’t get a job in law?  

Edited by One percent
Seem to have been infected by spy’s ketbaord
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Just now, One percent said:

There are law A levels now. 

Im not sure I understand how it has traditionally worked, but I think that people would do a Gergen, any degree, then do a years conversion course. 

Doing A levels and then a degree in law is going to limit your choices. 

What the fuck do you do if you don’t get a job in law?  

Become a shit Primeminister?

Edited by Hopeful
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15 minutes ago, One percent said:

There are law A levels now. 

Im not sure I understand how it has traditionally worked, but I think that people would do a general degree, any degree, then do a years conversion course. 

Doing A levels and then a degree in law is going to limit your choices. 

What the fuck do you do if you don’t get a job in law?  

 Mist solicitors, until very recently, started as a clerk after A levels.

Posher ones went posh Unis, setting them up for corporate law or aim at a barrister.

If you dont get a training contract ?  Teacher, grad job, police, public sector LAs.

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1 hour ago, One percent said:

There are law A levels now. 

Im not sure I understand how it has traditionally worked, but I think that people would do a general degree, any degree, then do a years conversion course. 

Doing A levels and then a degree in law is going to limit your choices. 

What the fuck do you do if you don’t get a job in law?  

I did law at university in the nineties. Utter waste of time unless you (or more likely your parents) had the contacts to ensure a training contract in a corporate law firm. May as well do a degree in surfing or star wars. The course content had very little to do with practical workings of the law and was taught by academics or failed lawyers that mostly had left leaning political axes to grind. Don't know if it is still the case, but at the time the degree meant you had to spend less time at law college in the unlikely event of pursuing a legal career.

What do you do if you don't get a job in law? Well I ended up a self employed trade, which would have been a fuck of a lot easier and more pleasant if I had left school at 16 and got an apprenticeship. I didn't stay in contact with anyone from university, but would be surprised if many ended up working in the law.

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3 minutes ago, Caravan Monster said:

I did law at university in the nineties. Utter waste of time unless you (or more likely your parents) had the contacts to ensure a training contract in a corporate law firm. May as well do a degree in surfing or star wars. The course content had very little to do with practical workings of the law and was taught by academics or failed lawyers that mostly had left leaning political axes to grind. Don't know if it is still the case, but at the time the degree meant you had to spend less time at law college in the unlikely event of pursuing a legal career.

What do you do if you don't get a job in law? Well I ended up a self employed trade, which would have been a fuck of a lot easier and more pleasant if I had left school at 16 and got an apprenticeship. I didn't stay in contact with anyone from university, but would be surprised if many ended up working in the law.

Exactly my point. Did you pay 9k a year for the privilege?  

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1 hour ago, Virgil Caine said:

If Wikipedia is to be believed the UK spends £2 billion pounds a year on legal aid, more per capita than any other country in the world

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Legal_aid

 

 

Lawyer tax to provide income for 2nd rate layers.

Where else would they get the £60/hr to justify doing a degree.

Other occupations are available.

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2 hours ago, One percent said:

There are law A levels now. 

Im not sure I understand how it has traditionally worked, but I think that people would do a general degree, any degree, then do a years conversion course. 

Doing A levels and then a degree in law is going to limit your choices. 

What the fuck do you do if you don’t get a job in law?  

argue about it on the internet thinking if only.

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