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Things are starting to bite. Big shots & Property developers committing suicide.


WorkingPoor
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WorkingPoor

It seems we have reached the point now where those who were just about hanging on financially have reached the end of the road, the realisation that there is to be another year of lockdowns and enforced business closures has started to push some to suicide themselves.

Big shot business owners heavily leveraged against their shuttered businesses to get into "property development" 

We'll start this with well known nightclub owner:

TRAGIC WORDS 

Mick Norcross tweeted ‘at the end remind yourself you did the best you could’ before being found dead’

https://www.thesun.co.uk/tvandshowbiz/13813341/mick-norcross-haunting-final-tweet-best-you-could/

MICK Norcross sent a haunting final tweet about "reminding yourself that you did the best you could" just hours before he was found dead.

Friends of the 57-year-old - who owns the famous Essex night club Sugar Hut - have been paying tribute to the star.

He became a property developer after quitting the show and was given the green light to build a dream rural manor house in leafy Essex in 2018.

Edited by WorkingPoor
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WorkingPoor

And this piece of work:

Dad who ‘took his own life’ left heartbreaking note reading: ‘Covid got me’

Read more: https://metro.co.uk/2020/12/03/dad-who-took-his-own-life-left-heartbreaking-note-reading-covid-got-me-13692854/?ico=related-posts?ito=cbshare

A father who is believed to have taken his own life during the first lockdown is one of the ‘many hidden victims’ of the pandemic, his brother has said. Financial adviser Nick Gunnell, 55, drowned in the River Ouse, near York, on June 30. Mr Gunnell had left an apologetic message for his family that expressed regret and said ‘Covid got me,’ heard an inquest into his death. Speaking after a coroner ruled a verdict of suicide at the inquest, Mr Gunnell’s brother Jez said many people like his brother are struggling in silence as a result of the pandemic. Jez, who paid tribute to his ‘amazing’ brother, said: ‘He is greatly missed by us all and we are all aware that Nick is a hidden victim of Covid-19 – one of many that have lost their precious lives or are suffering as a result of this devastating disease, that are not on any Government statistics.

The real reason he topped himself v

‘Apart from the oppressive media blitz, being under lockdown and deprived of his social life, Covid caused Nick enormous problems for the business that he had developed for 30 years.’

Lockdown had caused Mr Gunnell’s financial advice business problems and he had been suffering from anxiety and sleeping problems, said the coroner.

The inquest heard that before the pandemic, Mr Gunnell told his wife that 2020 was going to be ‘their year’.

He was preparing to sell his financial advice business and they were planning a tour of the Greek islands. But coronavirus travel restrictions meant the holiday was scrapped, the lockdown hit his business and the deal fell through, the inquest heard.

my bold: Soo many threads this one could have gone on. 

Edited by WorkingPoor
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WorkingPoor
16 minutes ago, spunko said:

Never make money your master :Old: I can't imagine committing suicide over something like this

Bang on! That was my point too.

I'd say 90% of suicides are directly linked back to money or finances. It's like they can't handle it when the game is up, the thought of not being seen as a "big success" drives them to it i'm sure it does. 

 

Edited by WorkingPoor
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This sort of thing reminds me of that guy that killed his family, horses, and pets over debt to 'protect them from poverty'.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maesbrook#Osbaston_House_deaths
 

Quote

 

Christopher Foster killed his 49-year-old wife, Jill, and their 15-year-old daughter, Kirstie, shortly after they had attended a barbecue party at a friend's home. Guests told police that there was nothing to indicate anything suspicious in Foster's manner or behaviour.[4]

A two-day inquest held in April 2009 heard that on the night of the killings, Kirstie had chatted with friends via social media until around midnight when her father had told her to go to bed. At some point later, Foster used his legally-owned rifle to kill his wife and daughter. CCTV footage then showed him outside shooting the family's horses and dogs. He also shot the tyres out on all the cars and blocked the entrance gate to the property with a horse transporter. Foster then doused the house, garage and stables in Heating oil. Once alight, he returned to his wife's body in an apparent act of immolation.[5]

An expert said that Foster killed his family because his businesses were in severe financial trouble and he wanted to "protect" them from poverty.[6

 

Financial stress is a killer.

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Chewing Grass

These next 4 months will see a peak as we cross the Taxation Threshold', debts are due and people start thinking whether 2021/22 is viable.

Rishi & The Covid Boys will have blood on their hands.

^^^ Good name for a band.

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Inevitable. Many self-employed and freelances, performers, hospitality staff not getting enough financial support to cover all the personal debt cheap credit has afforded them over recent decade or two, so the pressure of debt will ramp up the longer they're unable to earn a proper income.

Maybe a debt jubilee of certain debts will be considered if we really are in lockdown world for the foreseeable.

 

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swiss_democracy_for_all

A woman who was a friend of a friend here jumped off a building a few years back about 6 months after having a baby. She was a high-flyer stressy type with a good job. The life insurance paid out a very large sum (I thought they didn't in the case of suicide) and the husband is now bringing up the daughter next to a surf beach in Portugal. It's an ill wind....

Do these people mentioned above who commit suicide leave their families in the lurch even more, or do they also get paid out by the insurance?

 

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8 minutes ago, swiss_democracy_for_all said:

A woman who was a friend of a friend here jumped off a building a few years back about 6 months after having a baby. She was a high-flyer stressy type with a good job. The life insurance paid out a very large sum (I thought they didn't in the case of suicide) and the husband is now bringing up the daughter next to a surf beach in Portugal. It's an ill wind....

Do these people mentioned above who commit suicide leave their families in the lurch even more, or do they also get paid out by the insurance?

 

I think the suicide get out clause is only for a fixed period of time from the policy start. 

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Wight Flight
20 minutes ago, Option5 said:

I think the suicide get out clause is only for a fixed period of time from the policy start. 

Yep. When I had life insurance, suicide was only excluded for the first 12 months.

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swiss_democracy_for_all

So in fact they might be saving their families (in their mind, of course, as they're forgetting about the trauma etc) by committing suicide. I didn't know this was possible. 

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reformed nice guy

The local papers have lots of "missing men" and "bodies found" at the moment.

The suicides in the home largely go unreported

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maynardgravy
4 hours ago, spunko said:

Never make money your master :Old: I can't imagine committing suicide over something like this

His 'friends' were probably friends because of his status. His wife would have left him for not being the status she married. If you buy your friends and family, be prepared to lose them PDQ.

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WorkingPoor
1 minute ago, Stuey said:

These are the types that MPs will actually notice. 

Lets hope they dont open up nightclubs! O.o

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King Penda
3 hours ago, Option5 said:

I think the suicide get out clause is only for a fixed period of time from the policy start. 

A nice corona won’t say it’s suicide the key is don’t leave a note

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Frank Hovis

Whilst he was embezzling his solicitors business and took another £5k as he went I would view doing a Reggie Perrin like this guy as a far more attractive proposition.

Hugely in debt or otherwise fed up with your life?  Then throw your phone in the bin, get on a train and go flower picking.

He received a year in prison when caught but got a new life that he enjoyed.

Name: Alistair Liddle
Profession: Solictor
Date: 1997
Reason: Charged with malpractice; “loveless marriage”
Picture
Method: Alistair Liddle was a successful solicitor in Scotland. He called his wife one afternoon, to tell her that he had arrived safely at a meeting, and then vanished from sight, after withdrawing funds from the bank. He was presumed dead under mysterious circumstances. There were all kinds of rumours surrounding his disappearance, but none of them were very strong or held very much weight. Alistair had simply disappeared.

One year later, in Cornwall, England, somebody was murdered. The police questioned everyone who may have had an interest in the case, which included poor Alistair. During the questioning, he was obviously required to provide his real name – and when police ran a check on it, they saw that he had an unpaid traffic fine, and the rest was history.

It seems Alistair had called his wife that fateful day, and then thrown his phone in the closest bin and moved to Cornwall to start a brand new life as a flower picker.

Why couldn’t he just resign from his job, leave his wife and travel to Cornwall to pick flowers?

What did come out was that the image the town had of Alistair was wrong. Before he fled, he was in fact a grossly overweight solicitor, who lived in a loveless marriage, with a job that made him miserable. Years later, after all had came out, he had lost a remarkable amount of weight, lived with the love of his life, Paula, and their little baby girl.

Alistair was charged with embezzlement and jailed for 12 months for stealing £17,500 of his clients' money. He has said of the incident: "I do feel bad for the people I hurt and betrayed but I had no choice."

http://www.theparanormalguide.com/blog/people-who-faked-their-own-deaths

 

Before (right) after (left).

image.png.ae676f89c5d1b2d4cd6f273557eb41b8.png

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Local second hand car traders stopped buying stock, sales down a lot from what has been a busy year as people deserted public transport. Still low numbers of stock at local cheap auction though. 

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22 minutes ago, Frank Hovis said:

Whilst he was embezzling his solicitors business and took another £5k as he went I would view doing a Reggie Perrin like this guy as a far more attractive proposition.

Hugely in debt or otherwise fed up with your life?  Then throw your phone in the bin, get on a train and go flower picking.

He received a year in prison when caught but got a new life that he enjoyed.

Name: Alistair Liddle
Profession: Solictor
Date: 1997
Reason: Charged with malpractice; “loveless marriage”
Picture
Method: Alistair Liddle was a successful solicitor in Scotland. He called his wife one afternoon, to tell her that he had arrived safely at a meeting, and then vanished from sight, after withdrawing funds from the bank. He was presumed dead under mysterious circumstances. There were all kinds of rumours surrounding his disappearance, but none of them were very strong or held very much weight. Alistair had simply disappeared.

One year later, in Cornwall, England, somebody was murdered. The police questioned everyone who may have had an interest in the case, which included poor Alistair. During the questioning, he was obviously required to provide his real name – and when police ran a check on it, they saw that he had an unpaid traffic fine, and the rest was history.

It seems Alistair had called his wife that fateful day, and then thrown his phone in the closest bin and moved to Cornwall to start a brand new life as a flower picker.

Why couldn’t he just resign from his job, leave his wife and travel to Cornwall to pick flowers?

What did come out was that the image the town had of Alistair was wrong. Before he fled, he was in fact a grossly overweight solicitor, who lived in a loveless marriage, with a job that made him miserable. Years later, after all had came out, he had lost a remarkable amount of weight, lived with the love of his life, Paula, and their little baby girl.

Alistair was charged with embezzlement and jailed for 12 months for stealing £17,500 of his clients' money. He has said of the incident: "I do feel bad for the people I hurt and betrayed but I had no choice."

http://www.theparanormalguide.com/blog/people-who-faked-their-own-deaths

 

Before (right) after (left).

image.png.ae676f89c5d1b2d4cd6f273557eb41b8.png

To his credit- or discredit - he didnt fake his death. He just went.

Just dumping his wife, no kids, job and robbing cash.

I guess he could not think of way to brake away, so went for the easiest, extreme way out - Leg it.

He was very unlucky on being found out.

Some people just get shoved into lives they did not or no longer want.

Its like posh kids on MasterChef -

Here we have Quentin, 30,who trained as Barrister after Oxford and public school.

'I really want to be a chef as I hate law ....'

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leonardratso
25 minutes ago, onlyme said:

Local second hand car traders stopped buying stock, sales down a lot from what has been a busy year as people deserted public transport. Still low numbers of stock at local cheap auction though. 

??? is that a suicide risk?

ah sorry, might be just a 'things starting to bite example'.

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Just now, leonardratso said:

??? i that a suicide risk?

Nope, just an anecdote, some sectors have held out for months in the face of the headwinds, one by one I expect them to not carry on doing so.

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