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Will heavy industry ever recover in this country?


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This would happen only if housing costs fall significantly so that they are at a reasonable level comparable with those of other economies with which we are in competition. This would mean that:

We can either have industry or the City. We chose the City.

One of the best bits about the jobs I am talking about was that we undercut the manufacturer's repair and return or service-ex prices by 2/3rds. This brought in lots of lucrative business, but it also

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2 minutes ago, spygirl said:

You dont get out much, do you?

Not at all, as the laissez-faire British govt you talk of has locked me up for a year and won't let me leave the country; though if i do manage to lie my way out the country and upon returning lie on my arrival card as to where i've been i could get banged up for 10 years.

Though it does seem i've got 4 months partial day release coming up!

 

 

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4 minutes ago, Hancock said:

Doesnt Switzerland have a relatively healthy heavy industry working along side its money laundering operation?

Or is it just a case they're based there to keep their tax bill down.

Yes, and yes.

But :-

1. The politics isn't completely controlled by the banks, because it can't be, the people can always get the referendum stick out if it's needed. The banks still have enormous influence, of course, but they have to convince everyone, not just bribe an elite minority.

2. There is a mentality embedded in the culture that the country should be able to survive on it's own if necessary, while still embracing trade. Hence articles like this one about a new ethanol production plant, they were unhappy to discover they couldn't make enough within the borders during the early days of the pandemic. 

https://www.bluewin.ch/fr/infos/economie/de-l-thanol-sera-nouveau-produit-en-suisse-595146.html

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26 minutes ago, swiss_democracy_for_all said:

Yes, and yes.

But :-

1. The politics isn't completely controlled by the banks, because it can't be, the people can always get the referendum stick out if it's needed. The banks still have enormous influence, of course, but they have to convince everyone, not just bribe an elite minority.

2. There is a mentality embedded in the culture that the country should be able to survive on it's own if necessary, while still embracing trade. Hence articles like this one about a new ethanol production plant, they were unhappy to discover they couldn't make enough within the borders during the early days of the pandemic. 

https://www.bluewin.ch/fr/infos/economie/de-l-thanol-sera-nouveau-produit-en-suisse-595146.html

Out of curiosity, do you speak German or French fluently ... or were the Swiss company i presume you're working for happy to employ you on your English skills?

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Just now, Hancock said:

Out of curiosity, do you speak German or French fluently ... or were the Swiss company i presume you're working for happy to employ you on your English skills?

I speak French fluently, although I was a bit rusty when I started working for them, and some German that could be improved if it became necessary. They employ English-only speakers with key required skills for big projects but if you want to stick around, you need the local language.

 

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17 minutes ago, swiss_democracy_for_all said:

I speak French fluently, although I was a bit rusty when I started working for them, and some German that could be improved if it became necessary. They employ English-only speakers with key required skills for big projects but if you want to stick around, you need the local language.

 

Which one of these isn't you?

 

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15 hours ago, Bandit Banzai said:

But the shortage of skills is slowly being refelcted in salaries. Our starting salary for decent electronics people who can work to component level is well over 40k plus a 40k car. After five years you can take that to 60k+ And we still can't find anyone young who can do it.  We will have to start offering more soon.

I can do that, gissa job...!

City and Guilds 224 and RTEEB practical certificate...

 

XYY

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23 minutes ago, The XYY Man said:

I can do that, gissa job...!

City and Guilds 224 and RTEEB practical certificate...

 

XYY

Move to Stoke....

Thats where all the electric re-work/test companies are.

Hopefully one will move up to Boro - Bens Freeport.

Assuming the cost of electronic disposal increases, you'll a lot of electric re-work/dismantle work.

Ditto for re-work/fix of specialist electronic stuff , where the units are made in such low quantities the replacement cost is $$$$$$$$$$

 

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3 hours ago, swiss_democracy_for_all said:

I speak French fluently, although I was a bit rusty when I started working for them, and some German that could be improved if it became necessary. They employ English-only speakers with key required skills for big projects but if you want to stick around, you need the local language.

 

(un)fortunate for you that Swiss-German is pretty much like Scouse English, fucking hard to understand for anyone outside of the local area. :Old:

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7 hours ago, nickc said:

not prepared to train them?.....or looking for 'experienced' ...... not those who couldn't get experience because they had no experience..?!

?

Problem is it's field service. It has been discussed but considered too difficult to have a youngster shadowing someone as they travel around the UK/Ireland and occasionally Europe.

I think Europe is similar to us. Once a year we all get dragged out to a conference room in Germany. All the blokes who the company employs in Europe are all sat together and it's a room full of middle-aged/old blokes. There's very few in their 30's and zero in their 20's.

Best training is in production environments.

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2 hours ago, The XYY Man said:

City and Guilds 224

 

XYY

I started with 224! Was a 16 year old lad in a factory that made Video recorders, tellies and towards the end, sat receivers.

Then it all went tits up. I was lucky to find another employer who would carry on sending me to college but had to change to ONC/HNC. That's all I've got. Everyone else we employ are graduates.

 

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6 minutes ago, Bandit Banzai said:

I started with 224! Was a 16 year old lad in a factory that made Video recorders, tellies and towards the end, sat receivers.

Then it all went tits up. I was lucky to find another employer who would carry on sending me to college but had to change to ONC/HNC. That's all I've got. Everyone else we employ are graduates.

 

There's no need for a degree for most engineering work, but you can get to wear the shirt for some nondescript college..

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11 minutes ago, Bandit Banzai said:

I started with 224! Was a 16 year old lad in a factory that made Video recorders, tellies and towards the end, sat receivers.

Then it all went tits up. I was lucky to find another employer who would carry on sending me to college but had to change to ONC/HNC. That's all I've got. Everyone else we employ are graduates.

 

Well that's why you need me there, because I'll be better than all of them within eighteen months...!

I have worked for small specialist companies between the mid 90s and mid 00s doing bench repairs to component level on all sorts of industrial electronics, including many high power items such as AC/DC motor drives, inverters and soft-starts.

We did plenty of other stuff too, power supplies, industrial computers, video monitors, teach pendants and loads more interesting stuff. I am also competent in digital fault-finding with suitable test equipment. 

I also have a few years of field service experience as well as bench work. And I still like analogue 'scopes...!

Gissa job...

 

XYY

 

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8 minutes ago, The XYY Man said:

Well that's why you need me there, because I'll be better than all of them within eighteen months...!

I have worked for small specialist companies between the mid 90s and mid 00s doing bench repairs to component level on all sorts of industrial electronics, including many high power items such as AC/DC motor drives, inverters and soft-starts.

We did plenty of other stuff too, power supplies, industrial computers, video monitors, teach pendants and loads more interesting stuff. I am also competent in digital fault-finding with suitable test equipment. 

I also have a few years of field service experience as well as bench work. And I still like analogue 'scopes...!

Gissa job...

 

XYY

 

Me too mate. If you do the plod I'll walk around aimlessly with a clipboard, drawing Nyqvist Plots.

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7 minutes ago, The XYY Man said:

Well that's why you need me there, because I'll be better than all of them within eighteen months...!

I have worked for small specialist companies between the mid 90s and mid 00s doing bench repairs to component level on all sorts of industrial electronics, including many high power items such as AC/DC motor drives, inverters and soft-starts.

We did plenty of other stuff too, power supplies, industrial computers, video monitors, teach pendants and loads more interesting stuff. I am also competent in digital fault-finding with suitable test equipment. 

I also have a few years of field service experience as well as bench work. And I still like analogue 'scopes...!

Gissa job...

 

XYY

 

We aren't looking yet, but we will be later this year. Totally agree on the analog 'scope. Mines 25 years old, proper old crt but you can trust what it displays is real. I do get some stick from the lads lumping that thing around though.

My boss tells me the stories from the people who he interviews - it's a real eye-opener. But then again, if there's been very little electronic production in this country then there won't be many blokes with hands-on ability.

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19 hours ago, Hancock said:

But my personal energy to do something constructive has gone, caused by waiting for a HPC which has drained me to the point i will only make tax threshold and try and play as little of their game as possible.

I am getting on and I'm sensitive when blamed for having white boomer privilege, everything was handed to me on a plate and now I'm pulling up the ladder etc.

I do think there is a grain of truth in it though. My piece of luck wasn't anything concrete like cheap house prices (I don't own a house) nor was it "gold plated pensions." Where I got lucky was being a working man at a time when it was reasonably worth it and you got at least something in return.

Now although I am still working I feel exactly like everyone in this thread - absolute minimum from me. Although from time to time I do what I hope are useful things under the table and out of sight of management, just as a sort of thank you to god for good health and my other things, and in an attempt to retain my sanity.

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9 hours ago, Popuplights said:

I like to the he is going to be very well placed when he hits the job market. As long as he finds an employer who appreciates those skills. 

He is going to be fine. My son is very much the same and has never had a problem. My management are pretty smart about hiring and the apprentices and grads I see at work are clearly that sort of person as well. 

There's no substitute for knowing what you're doing.

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1 hour ago, MrPin said:

Too late then. I'm afraid even that cunt will have  job. Me too maybe. There's no substitute for practical ability.

One of the best bits about the jobs I am talking about was that we undercut the manufacturer's repair and return or service-ex prices by 2/3rds. This brought in lots of lucrative business, but it also meant the OEMs would give us no support whatsoever. 

We also took on pretty much any job, and obsolete equipment was a particular favourite of mine. I once worked on a logic board for Rolls Royce in Sunderland with a 4004 processor, and dynamic ram chips that had four seperate power rails. The RAM card was about 3ft x 2ft and had loads of these chips on it. Total RAM on the board was something like 2K...!

Another thing I loved was the way we sometimes had to do some pretty Heath Robinson stuff when testing three-phase motor drives. We had a variety of real motors, but every now and again we get a unit in for repair that would exceed the power rating of our largest one.

Connecting a load of three banks of multiple electric fire elements in parallel with a light bulb and winding the speed control slowly up to see the lamps light in sequence until the frequency was fast enough so that persistence of vision made them all look stationary was always a fun afternoon in the workshop...!

 

XYY

Edited by The XYY Man
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3 minutes ago, The XYY Man said:

One of the best bits about the jobs I am talking about was that we undercut the manufacturer's repair and return or service-ex prices by 2/3rds. This brought in lots of lucrative business, but it also meant the OEMs would give us no support whatsoever. 

We also took on pretty much any job, and obsolete equipment was a particular favourite of mine. I once worked on a logic board for Rolls Royce in Sunderland with a 4004 processor, and dynamic ram chips that had four seperate power rails. The RAM card was about 3ft x 2ft and had load of these chips. Total RAM on the board was something like 2K...!

Another thing I loved was the way we sometimes had to do some pretty Heath Robinson stuff when testing three-phase motor drives. We had a variety of real motors, but every now and again we get a unit in for repair that would exceed the power rating of our largest one.

Connecting a load of three banks of multiple electric fire elements in parallel with a light bulb and winding the speed control slowly up to see the lamps light in sequence until the frequency was fast enough so that persistence of vision made them all look stationary was always a fun afternoon in the workshop...!

 

XYY

Bragging! Again?

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